All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship

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All Ireland Senior Camogie Championship
Current season or competition:
Current event clock.svg 2021 All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship
All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship logo (2017).png
Irish Craobh Shinsir Camógaíochta na hÉireann
Founded 1932
Trophy O'Duffy Cup
Title holders Kilkenny (14th title)
Most titles Cork (28 titles)
Sponsors Liberty Insurance
TV partner(s) RTÉ 2
Sky Sports

The All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship is a competition for inter-county teams in the women's field sport of game of camogie played in Ireland. [1] The series of games are organised by the Camogie Association and are played during the summer months with the All-Ireland Camogie Final being played on the second Sunday in September in Croke Park, Dublin. The prize for the winning team is the O'Duffy Cup.

Contents

The senior camogie championship finals tends to be less eventful than their counterparts in the men's sport of hurling. There are lower score tallies and seldom is there a goal. [2] Only fourteen points were scored by the winning team in the 2018 senior final, and most points in the game followed the awarding of frees. [2] Ten points was sufficient to determine the winner of the 2017 senior final. [2] The current champions are Kilkenny, who beat Galway in Croke Park, Dublin.

Participants

The county is a geographical region in Ireland, and each of 29 of the 32 counties in Ireland organises its own camogie affairs. Twelve Counties currently participate in the Championship following the promotion of Intermediate champions Down at the end of the 2020 season. These are Clare, Cork, Down, Dublin, Galway, Kilkenny, Limerick, Offaly, Tipperary, Waterford, Westmeath and Wexford. [3]

Format

The counties participate in a group series with the top teams progressing to the knock-out stages. The eight teams were divided into two groups of four in 2009. In every other year the teams were placed in a single group of between six and eight teams. The first two championships were played on an open draw basis until in 1934 the championship was changed to the traditional quadro-provincial structure traditional to Gaelic games. Following the withdrawal of Connacht from the inter-provincial senior semi-finals the competition changed to an open-draw knockout system in 1974.

Introduction of group system in 2006

The championship structure was changed from a knockout to a round-robin system in 2006. The system was retained despite some initial criticism. [4] An anomaly occurred in four of the first six championships under the new format (2006, 2008, 2010 and 2011) with the defeated All-Ireland finalists beating the eventual champions in the group stages, only to eventually lose to the same opposition in the All-Ireland final:

Winners by county

Cork have won the All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship the most times – twenty-eight titles. Dublin have 26 Titles. Dublin won their very first All-Ireland title in 1932 and went on to dominate the competition for the next thirty five years. Between 1948 and 1955 they won eight consecutive titles in-a-row. Two years later in 1957 Dublin began another great run of success which ended in 1966 with the capturing of their tenth consecutive All-Ireland title. Had it not been for defeats in 1947, 1956 and 1967 it is reasonable to assume that Dublin could have captured twenty-one All-Ireland titles in succession. For a twenty-year period from 1974 until 1994 the Kilkenny camogie team dominated the championship. Between 1999 and 2006 Tipp won five All-Ireland titles from eight consecutive final appearances. Since 1998 Cork have won nine All-Ireland titles, their latest coming in 2018.

Six counties - Louth (1934 and 1936), Waterford (1945), Down (1948), Derry (1954), Mayo (1959) and Limerick (1980) each appeared in All-Ireland finals without ever winning the O’Duffy Cup while London appeared in the All-Ireland final "proper", effectively a play-off between the All-Ireland champions and British provincial champions in 1949 and 1950. Three counties, Kildare (1933), Cavan (1940 and 1941) and Clare (1944, and 1978) have contested the All-Ireland semi-final without qualifying for a final. The following is a list of the top county teams by number of wins.

Click on the year for details and team line-outs from each individual championship.
CountyWinsYears wonRunners-upYears Runners-up
Colours of Cork.svg Cork 28 1934, 1935, 1936, 1939, 1940, 1941, 1970, 1971, 1972, 1973, 1978, 1980, 1982, 1983, 1992, 1993, 1995, 1997, 1998, 2002, 2005, 2006, 2008, 2009, 2014, 2015, 2017, 2018 201938, 1942, 1943, 1955, 1956, 1968, 1974, 1975, 1981, 1987, 1988, 1989, 1991, 1996, 2000, 2003, 2004, 2007, 2012, 2016
Colours of Dublin.svg Dublin 26 1932, 1933, 1937, 1938, 1942, 1943, 1944, 1948, 1949, 1950, 1951, 1952, 1953, 1954, 1955, 1957, 1958, 1959, 1960, 1961, 1962, 1963, 1964, 1965, 1966, 1984 101935, 1941, 1947, 1967, 1976, 1978, 1982, 1983, 1985, 1986
Colours of Kilkenny.svg Kilkenny 14 1974, 1976, 1977, 1981, 1985, 1986, 1987, 1988, 1989, 1990, 1991, 1994, 2016, 2020 101970, 1995, 1999, 2001, 2009, 2013, 2014, 2017, 2018, 2019
Colours of Wexford.svg Wexford 7 1968, 1969, 1975, 2007, 2010, 2011, 2012 51971, 1977, 1990, 1992, 1994
Colours of Antrim.svg Antrim 6 1945, 1946, 1947, 1956, 1967, 1979 101944, 1950, 1951, 1952, 1957, 1963, 1964, 1966, 1969, 1973
Colours of Tipperary.svg Tipperary 5 1999, 2000, 2001, 2003, 2004 101949, 1953, 1958, 1961, 1965, 1979, 1984, 2002, 2005, 2006
Colours of Galway.svg Galway 3 1996, 2013, 2019 161932, 1933, 1937, 1939, 1940, 1946, 1960, 1962, 1993, 1997, 1998, 2008, 2010, 2011, 2015, 2020
Colours of Louth.svg Louth 021934, 1936
Colours of Waterford.svg Waterford 011945
Colours of Down.svg Down 011948
Colours of Derry.svg Derry 011954
Colours of Mayo.svg Mayo 011959
Colours of Limerick.svg Limerick 011980

Highlights and incidents

Highlights and incidents through the history of the championship include:

All-Ireland Senior Camogie Finals

Click on the year for details and team line-outs from each individual championship.

The first numeral in the scoreline of each team is the number of goals scored (equal to 3 points each) and the second numeral is the number of points scored, the figures are combined to determine the winner of a match in Gaelic games. Match duration was raised from 40 minutes to 50 minutes for the 1934 championship and subsequent championships up to 1987, and from 50 minutes to 60 minutes for the 1988 and subsequent championships. The points bar was removed for the 1979 and subsequent championships. Teams were increased from 12-a-side to 15-a-side for the 1999 and subsequent championships.

YearDateWinnerScoreR-upScoreVenueAttend.CaptainReferee
1932 [6] Jy30 '33 Dublin 3-02 Galway 0-02 Galway Sp. 1,000 Máire Gill Stephen Jordan (Galway)
1933 17 Dec Dublin 9-02 Galway 4-00 Killester 1,000 Máire Gill Julian McDonnell (Meath)
1934 28 Oct Cork 4-03 Louth 1-04 Croke Park 3,500 Kathleen Delea Tommie Ryan (Tipperary)
1935 24 Nov Cork 3-04 Dublin 4-00 Cork Ath Gds 2,000 Josie McGrath Tommie Ryan (Tipperary)
1936 11 Oct Cork 6-04 Louth 3-03 Croke Park 2,000 Kathleen Cotter Peg Morris (Galway)
1937 28 Nov Dublin 9-04 Galway 1-00 Croke Park 5,000 Mary Walsh Lil Kirby (Cork)
1938 30 Oct Dublin 5-00 Cork 2-03 Cork Ath Gds 2,000 Emmy Delaney Peg Morris (Galway)
1939 12 Nov Cork 6-01 Galway 1-01 Croke Park 5,000 Renee Fitzgerald Vera Campbell (Tyrone)
1940 13 Oct Cork 4-01 Galway 2-02 Croke Park 3,000 Lil Kirby Vera Campbell (Tyrone)
1941 12 Oct Cork 7-05 Dublin 1-02 Croke Park 4,000 Kathleen Buckley Peg Morris (Galway)
1942 25 Oct Dublin 1-02 Cork 1-02 Croke Park 4,000Seán Gleeson (Tipperary)
Replay 15 Nov Dublin 4-01 Cork 2-02 Croke Park 6,100 Peggy Griffin Seán Gleeson (Tipperary)
1943 17 Oct Dublin 8-00 Cork 1-01 Croke Park 9,136 [7] Peggy Griffin Vera Campbell (Tyrone)
1944 5 Nov Dublin 5-04 Antrim 0-00 Corrigan Pk 2,600 [8] Doreen Rogers Seán Gleeson (Tipperary)
1945 [9] Sept 30 Antrim 5-02 Waterford 3-02 Cappoquin 2,500 Marie O'Gorman Seán Gleeson (Tipperary)
1946 Sept 29 Antrim 4-01 Galway 2-03 Corrigan Pk 5,000 [10] Marjorie Griffin Michael Hennessy Clare
1947 9 Nov Antrim 2-04 Dublin 2-01 Corrigan Pk 5,000 Celia Quinn Celia Mulholland (Galway)
1948 [11] 23 Oct Dublin 11-04 Down 4-02 Croke Park 1,500 Sophie Brack James Byrne (Waterford)
1949 [12] 30 Oct Dublin 8-06 Tipperary 4-01 Roscrea 6,000 Doreen Rogers Celia Mulholland (Galway)
[13] 4 Dec Dublin 9-03 London 2-02 Croke Park 700 Doreen Rogers Kathleen O'Duffy (Dublin)
1950 [12] 3 Dec Dublin 6-05 Antrim 4-01 Croke Park 3,000 Pat Raftery Celia Mulholland (Galway)
[14] 26 Mar Dublin 8-02 London 1-02 Mitcham 1,300 Pat Raftery
1951 19 Aug Dublin 8-06 Antrim 4-01 Croke Park 4,000 Sophie Brack Celia Mulholland (Galway)
1952 10 Aug Dublin 5-01 Antrim 4-02 Croke Park 4,000 Sophie Brack Celia Mulholland (Galway)
1953 2 Aug Dublin 8-04 Tipperary 1-03 Croke Park 4,000 Sophie Brack Lily Spence (Antrim)
1954 22 Aug Dublin 10-04 Derry 4-02 Croke Park 2,000 Sophie Brack Noreen Murphy (Cork)
1955 [15] 28 Aug Dublin 9-02 Cork 5-06 Croke Park 4,192 Sophie Brack Lily Spence (Antrim)
1956 Sept 30 Antrim 5-03 Cork 4-02 Croke Park 4,100 Madge Rainey Kathleen O'Duffy (Dublin)
1957 6 Oct Dublin 3-03 Antrim 3-01 Croke Park 7,000 Eileen Duffy Noreen Murphy (Cork)
1958 10 Aug Dublin 5-04 Tipperary 1-01 Croke Park 6,000 [16] Kathleen Mills Nancy Murray (Antrim)
1959 Sept 13 Dublin 11-06 Mayo 1-03 Croke Park 4,000 Bríd Reid Nancy Murray (Antrim)
1960 13 Nov Dublin 6-02 Galway 2-00 Croke Park 2,800 Doreen Brennan Eithne Neville (Limerick)
1961 8 Oct Dublin 7-02 Tipperary 4-01 Croke Park 4,000 Gerry Hughes Maeve Gilroy (Antrim)
1962 12 Aug Dublin 5-05 Galway 2-00 Croke Park 9,000 Gerry Hughes Maeve Gilroy (Antrim)
1963 Sept 8 Dublin 7-03 Antrim 2-05 Croke Park 3,500 Úna O'Connor Gloria Lee (Kildare)
1964 4 Oct Dublin 7-04 Antrim 3-01 Croke Park 3,500 Úna O'Connor Vera McDonnell (Mayo)
1965 Sept 19 Dublin 10-01 Tipperary 5-03 Croke Park 3,500 Kathleen Ryder Nuala Kavanagh (Sligo)
1966 Sept 18 Dublin 2-02 Antrim 0-06 Croke Park 3,500 Kathleen Ryder Bernie Byrne (Mon’n)
1967 Sept 17 Antrim 4-02 Dublin 4-02 Croke Park 15,879 [17] Eithne Neville (Limerick)
Replay 15 Oct Antrim 3-09 Dublin 4-02 Croke Park 3,000 Sue Cashman Eithne Neville (Limerick)
1968 Sept 15 Wexford 4-02 Cork 2-05 Croke Park 4,500 Mary Walsh Nancy Murray (Antrim)
1969 Sept 21 Wexford 4-04 Antrim 4-02 Croke Park 4,500 Bridget Doyle Lil O'Grady (Cork)
1970 Sept 20 Cork 5-07 Kilkenny 3-02 Croke Park 4,000 Ann Comerford Nancy Murray (Antrim)
1971 Sept 19 Cork 4-06 Wexford 1-02 Croke Park 4,000 Betty Sugrue Lily Spence (Antrim)
1972 Sept 17 Cork 2-05 Kilkenny 1-04 Croke Park 4,000 Hannah Dineen Lily Spence (Antrim)
1973 Sept 16 Cork 2-05 Antrim 3-01 Croke Park 4,000 Marie Costine Phyllis Breslin (Dublin)
1974 Sept 15 Kilkenny 3-08 Cork 4-05 Croke Park 4,000Jane Murphy (Galway)
Replay 6 Oct Kilkenny 3-03 Cork 1-05 Croke Park 5,000 Teresa O'Neill Jane Murphy (Galway)
1975 Sept 21 Wexford 4-03 Cork 1-02 Croke Park 4,000 Gretta Quigley Jane Murphy (Galway)
1976 Sept 19 Kilkenny 0-06 Dublin 1-02 Croke Park 6,000 Mary Fennelly Jane Murphy (Galway)
1977 Sept 18 Kilkenny 3-04 Wexford 1-03 Croke Park 4,000 Angela Downey Mary Lynch (Monaghan)
1978 Sept 17 Cork 6-04 Dublin 1-02 Croke Park 4,000 Nancy O'Driscoll Helena O'Neill (Kilkenny)
1979 Sept 9 Antrim 2-03 Tipperary 1-03 Croke Park 2,900 Mairéad McAtamney Sheila McNamee (Dublin)
1980 Sept 14 Cork 2-07 Limerick 3-04 Croke Park 2,700 Rosina MacManus (Antrim)
Replay Sept 28 Cork 1-08 Limerick 2-02 Croke Park 3,013 Mary Geaney Rosina MacManus (Antrim)
1981 Sept 13 Kilkenny 3-09 Cork 3-09 Croke Park 3,000 Phyllis Breslin (Dublin)
Replay 4 Oct Kilkenny 1-09 Cork 0-07 Croke Park 3,000 Liz Neary Phyllis Breslin (Dublin)
1982 Sept 26 Cork 2-07 Dublin 2-06 Croke Park 3,000 Pat Lenihan Belle O'Loughlin (Down)
1983 Sept 25 Cork 2-05 Dublin 1-06 Croke Park 3,413 Cathy Landers Kathleen Quinn (Galway)
1984 Sept 9 Dublin 5-09 Tipperary 2-04 Croke Park 4,219 Anne Colgan Kathleen Quinn (Galway)
1985 Sept 15 Kilkenny 0-13 Dublin 1-05 Croke Park 3,500 Bridie McGarry Miriam Higgins (Cork)
1986 Sept 14 Kilkenny 2-12 Dublin 2-03 Croke Park 5,000 Liz Neary Betty Joyce (Cork)
1987 Sept 27 Kilkenny 3-10 Cork 1-07 Croke Park 5,496 Bridie McGarry Anne Redmond (Dublin) [18]
1988 Sept 25 Kilkenny 4-11 Cork 3-08 Croke Park 4,000 Angela Downey Belle O'Loughlin (Down)
1989 Sept 24 Kilkenny 3-10 Cork 2-05 Croke Park 3,024 Ann Downey Kathleen Quinn (Galway)
1990 Sept 23 Kilkenny 1-14 Wexford 0-07 Croke Park 4,000 Breda Holmes Miriam Murphy (Cork)
1991 Sept 22 Kilkenny 3-08 Cork 0-10 Croke Park 4,000 Angela Downey Miriam O'Callaghan (Offaly)
1992 Sept 27 Cork 1-20 Wexford 2-06 Croke Park 4,000 Sandie Fitzgibbon Áine Derham (Dublin)
1993 Sept 26 Cork 3-15 Galway 2-08 Croke Park 5,400 Linda Mellerick Miriam O'Callaghan (Offaly)
1994 Sept 25 Kilkenny 2-11 Wexford 0-08 Croke Park 5,000 Ann Downey Maria Pollard (Waterford)
1995 Sept 24 Cork 4-08 Kilkenny 2-10 Croke Park 9,874 Denise Cronin Áine Derham (Dublin)
1996 [19] Sept 22 Galway 4-08 Cork 1-15 Croke Park 10,235 Imelda Hobbins Áine Derham (Dublin)
1997 [20] Sept 7 Cork 0-15 Galway 2-05 Croke Park 10,212 Linda Mellerick Biddy Phillips (Tipperary)
1998 [21] Sept 6 Cork 2-13 Galway 0-15 Croke Park 10,436 Eithne Duggan John Morrissey (Tipperary)
1999 [22] Sept 5 Tipperary 0-12 Kilkenny 1-08 Croke Park 15,084 Meadhbh Stokes Áine Derham (Dublin)
2000 [23] Sept 3 Tipperary 2-11 Cork 1-09 Croke Park 12,880 Jovita Delaney Áine Derham (Dublin)
2001 [24] Sept 16 Tipperary 4-13 Kilkenny 1-06 Croke Park 16,354 Emily Hayden Áine Derham (Dublin)
2002 [25] Sept 15 Cork 4-09 Tipperary 1-09 Croke Park 13,287 Úna O'Donoghue Aileen Lawlor (Westmeath)
2003 [26] Sept 21 Tipperary 2-11 Cork 1-11 Croke Park 16,183 Úna O'Dwyer Áine Derham (Dublin)
2004 [27] Sept 19 Tipperary 2-11 Cork 0-09 Croke Park 24,567 Joanne Ryan Úna Kearney (Armagh)
2005 [28] Sept 18 Cork 1-17 Tipperary 1-13 Croke Park 14,350 Elaine Burke John Pender (Kildare)
2006 [29] Sept 10 Cork 0-12 Tipperary 0-04 Croke Park 20,685 Joanne O'Callaghan Fintan McNamara (Clare)
2007 [30] Sept 9 Wexford 2-07 Cork 1-08 Croke Park 33,154 Mary Leacy John Morrissey (Tipperary)
2008 [31] Sept 14 Cork 2-10 Galway 1-08 Croke Park 18,727 Cathriona Foley Eamonn Browne (Tipperary)
2009 [32] Sept 13 Cork 0-15 Kilkenny 0-07 Croke Park 25,924 Amanda O'Regan Úna Kearney (Armagh)
2010 [33] Sept 12 Wexford 1-12 Galway 1-10 Croke Park 17,290 Una Leacy Karl O'Brien (Dublin)
2011 [34] Sept 11 Wexford 2-07 Galway 1-08 Croke Park 14,974 Ursula Jacob Mike O'Kelly (Cork)
2012 Sept 16 Wexford 3-13 Cork 3-06 Croke Park 15,900 Karen Atkinson Alan Lagrue (Kildare)
2013 [35] Sept 15 Galway 1-09 Kilkenny 0-07 Croke Park 15,063 Lorraine Ryan Ger O'Dowd (Limerick)
2014 [36] Sept 14 Cork 2-12 Kilkenny 1-09 Croke Park 12,476 Anna Geary John Dolan (Clare)
2015 [37] Sept 13 Cork 1-13 Galway 0-09 Croke Park 16,610 Ashling Thompson R. Kelly (Kildare)
2016 [38] 11 Sep Kilkenny 1-13 Cork 1-09 Croke Park 20,037 Michelle Quilty E Cassidy (Derry)
2017 [39] 10 Sep Cork 0-10 Kilkenny 0-09 Croke Park 20,438 Rena Buckley O Elliott (Antrim)
2018 9 Sep Cork 0-14 Kilkenny 0-13 Croke Park 21,467 Aoife Murray E Cassidy (Derry)
2019 8 Sep Galway 3-14 Kilkenny 0-17 Croke Park 24,730 Sarah Dervan Ray Kelly (Kildare)
2020 12 Dec Kilkenny 1-14 Galway 1-11 Croke Park 0Owen Elliott (Antrim)

See also

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References

  1. Moran, Mary (2011). A Game of Our Own: The History of Camogie. Dublin, Ireland: Cumann Camógaíochta. p. 460.
  2. 1 2 3 Crowe, Dermot (8 September 2019). "Breaking new ground on final day as Kilkenny look to bury pain of defeat". Sunday Independent . Retrieved 8 September 2019. Recent finals have been without goals and scorelines have stayed relatively low compared to hurling. Ten points won the final two years ago. The winning total last year was 14 points. The majority of the scores in last year's final came from frees.
  3. "All-Ireland Camogie Championship dates and formats 2021". Irish News. 26 May 2021.
  4. em-scrapped-77004.html John Cronin: Scrap the new championship system and go back to a straight knock-out, Irish Independent Sept 7 2006 [ permanent dead link ]
  5. The Evolution of the GAA by Donal McAnallen (Ulster Historical Foundation 2009) ISBN   978-1-903688-83-0
  6. Historic newspaper reports of All Ireland finals
  7. For many years this was the record attendance at a camogie final, albeit in the absence of verifiable figures for the 1962 final which may have exceeded it. Corry, Eoghan (2005). Illustrated History of the GAA. Dublin, Ireland: Gill & MacMillan. p. 250.
  8. Gate receipts were reported at £111, Irish Independent, 6 November 1944
  9. Details of the 1945 “unofficial” All Ireland final between Dublin and Cork can be found here, staged in opposition the official all Ireland final, which had been won by Antrim. Two of the three strongest counties, Cork and Dublin, had both been suspended when they refused to implement the newly imposed ban on hockey players. The Cork team that participated in the "official" Munster championship was effectively a junior team. Dublin beat Wicklow in an "unofficial" Leinster final. Cork and Dublin then agreed to play off in a replayed All Ireland final which featured most of the leading stars of the time. The teams played twice, a 1-1 to 1-1 draw on 14 October in Croke Park and a replay in the Mardyke on 18 November, also drawn, Cork 2-3 Dublin 3-0.
  10. Gate receipts were reported at £250, Anglo Celt, 5 October 1946
  11. Final played on a Saturday, Sunday Press 24 October 1948,
  12. 1 2 Home final
  13. In 1949 and 1950 the All Ireland champions Dublin then played the champions of Britain in what was termed the "final proper"
  14. The match at Croke Park between Dublin and Antrim in August 1950 was listed as the "home final" and the match between Dublin and London at Mitcham on Easter Monday 1951 was described as the All Ireland final for 1950, preview in the Irish Times, 24 March 1951, and report in the Irish Independent, 27 March 1951
  15. 1955 Dublin 9-2 Cork 5-6 recalled in RTÉ radio interview with Eileen Hogan Archived 14 July 2007 at the Wayback Machine
  16. The 1958 final was played some time after the All Ireland senior hurling semi-final between Tipperary and Kilkenny, about 6,000 of the 53,357 attendance waited to see the camogie match according to the Irish Press, 11 Aug 1958, p24
  17. Played as the curtain raiser to the Kilkenny v Clare Oireachtas Hurling final.
  18. Irish Independent: Aileen the woman in the middle
  19. 1996 All Ireland final report in Irish Times
  20. 1997 All Ireland final reports in Irish Examiner Archived 29 June 2011 at the Wayback Machine and Irish Times
  21. 1998 All Ireland final reports in Irish Examiner Archived 22 June 2011 at the Wayback Machine , Irish Independent and Irish Times
  22. 1999 All Ireland final reports in Irish Examiner Archived 29 June 2011 at the Wayback Machine , Irish Independent and Irish Times also comment on reversal of League final result
  23. 2000 All Ireland final report in Irish Times
  24. 2001 All Ireland final reports in Irish Independent and Irish Times
  25. 2002 All Ireland final reports in Irish Examiner, Irish Independent, and Irish Times.
  26. 2003 All Ireland final reports in Irish Examiner Archived 2012-12-02 at archive.today , Irish Independent, and Irish Times.
  27. 2004 All Ireland final reports in Irish Examiner Archived 2011-08-10 at the Wayback Machine , Irish Independent, Irish Times and Rebelgaa.com Archived 18 March 2012 at the Wayback Machine
  28. 2005 All Ireland final reports in Examiner, Irish Independent, Irish Times and Rebelgaa.com Archived 19 February 2012 at the Wayback Machine
  29. 2006 All Ireland final reports in Irish Examiner, Irish Independent, Irish Times and Youtube Video highlights part one and part two.
  30. 2007 All Ireland final reports in Irish Examiner, Irish Independent, Irish Times and Gorey Guardian Archived 19 February 2012 at the Wayback Machine
  31. 2008 All Ireland final reports in Irish Examiner, Irish Independent, Irish Times and Reaction in Irish Examiner
  32. 2009 All Ireland final reports in Irish Examiner, Independent and Irish Times and Youtube Video Highlights of 2009 All Ireland Senior Final
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