1988 FIFA Women's Invitation Tournament

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1988 FIFA Women's Invitation Tournament
1988 FIFA Tourny ISL.jpg
Official poster
Tournament details
Host countryChina
Dates1–12 June
Teams12 (from 6 confederations)
Final positions
ChampionsFlag of Norway.svg  Norway
Runners-upFlag of Sweden.svg  Sweden
Third placeFlag of Brazil.svg  Brazil
Fourth placeFlag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China PR
Tournament statistics
Matches played26
Goals scored81 (3.12 per match)

The 1988 FIFA Women's Invitation Tournament, or International Women's Football Tournament, was organised by FIFA in China from 1 to 12 June 1988. The competition was a test to study if a global women's World Cup was feasible following the experience of non-FIFA invitational competitions such as the Mundialito (1984–88) and the Women's World Invitational Tournament (1978–87). [1] The competition was a success and on 30 June FIFA approved the establishment of an official World Cup for 1991, which would also be held in China. [2]

FIFA International governing body of association football

The Fédération Internationale de Football Association is a non-profit organization which describes itself as an international governing body of association football, fútsal, beach soccer, and efootball.

China Country in East Asia

China, officially the People's Republic of China (PRC), is a country in East Asia and the world's most populous country, with a population of around 1.404 billion. Covering approximately 9,600,000 square kilometers (3,700,000 sq mi), it is the third- or fourth-largest country by total area. Governed by the Communist Party of China, the state exercises jurisdiction over 22 provinces, five autonomous regions, four direct-controlled municipalities, and the special administrative regions of Hong Kong and Macau.

The Mundialito was a global invitational tournament for national teams in women's association football. Held on four occasions in the northern region of Italy since 1984, it was one of the most prestigious women's football events, prior to the advent of the Women's World Cup and Women's Olympic Football.

Contents

Twelve national teams took part in the competition – four from UEFA, three from AFC, two from CONCACAF and one from CONMEBOL, CAF and OFC. European champion Norway defeated Sweden 1–0 in the final to win the tournament, while Brazil clinched the bronze by beating the hosts in a penalty shootout. Australia, Canada, the Netherlands and the United States also reached the final stages. [3]

UEFA international sport governing body

The Union of European Football Associations is the administrative body for association football, futsal and beach soccer in Europe, although several member states are primarily or entirely located in Asia. It is one of six continental confederations of world football's governing body FIFA. UEFA consists of 55 national association members.

Asian Football Confederation governing body of association football in Asia

The Asian Football Confederation (AFC) is the governing body of association football in Asia and Australia. It has 47 member countries, mostly located on the Asian and Australian continent, but excludes the transcontinental countries with territory in both Europe and Asia – Azerbaijan, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Russia, and Turkey – which are instead members of UEFA. Three other states located geographically along the western fringe of Asia – Cyprus, Armenia and Israel – are also UEFA members. On the other hand, Australia, formerly in the OFC, joined the Asian Football Confederation in 2006, and the Oceanian island of Guam, a territory of the United States, is also a member of AFC, in addition to Northern Mariana Islands, one of the Two Commonwealths of the United States. Hong Kong and Macau, although not independent countries, are also members of the AFC.

CONCACAF International sport governing body

The Confederation of North, Central American and Caribbean Association Football is one of FIFA's 6 continental governing bodies for association football. Its 41 members include nations and territories in North America, including Central America and the Caribbean. Three geographically South American entities are also members — Guyana, Suriname, and the French overseas department of French Guiana and Martinique. CONCACAF's primary functions are to organize competitions for national teams and clubs, and to conduct World Cup and Women's World Cup qualifying tournaments.

Venues

The tournament took place in 4 cities in the province of Guangdong: Guangzhou, Foshan, Jiangmen and Panyu.

Guangdong Most populous province of the Peoples Republic of China

Guangdong is a province in South China, on the South China Sea coast. Its capital and largest city is Guangzhou. Guangdong surpassed Henan and Shandong to become the most populous province in China in January 2005, registering 79.1 million permanent residents and 31 million migrants who lived in the province for at least six months of the year; the total population was 104,303,132 in the 2010 census, accounting for 7.79 percent of Mainland China's population. This makes it the most populous first-level administrative subdivision of any country outside of South Asia, as its population is surpassed only by those of the Pakistani province of Punjab and the Indian states of Bihar, Maharashtra and Uttar Pradesh.

Guangzhou Prefecture-level and Sub-provincial city in Guangdong, Peoples Republic of China

Guangzhou, also known as Canton and formerly romanized as Kwangchow or Kwong Chow, is the capital and most populous city of the province of Guangdong in southern China. On the Pearl River about 120 km (75 mi) north-northwest of Hong Kong and 145 km (90 mi) north of Macau, Guangzhou has a history of over 2,200 years and was a major terminus of the maritime Silk Road, and continues to serve as a major port and transportation hub, as well as one of China's three largest cities.

Foshan Prefecture-level city in Guangdong, Peoples Republic of China

Foshan, alternately romanized as Fatshan, is a prefecture-level city in central Guangdong Province, China. The entire prefecture covers 3,848.49 km2 (1,485.91 sq mi) and has an urban population around 7.2 million in 2012. It forms part of the western side of the Pearl River Delta Economic Zone, which includes Guangzhou to the east and northeast and Zhongshan to the southeast.

Teams

12 national teams participated in the tournament, all invited by FIFA.

Confederation of African Football governing body of association football in Africa

The Confederation of African Football or CAF is the administrative and controlling body for African association football.

The Ivory Coast women's national football team represents Ivory Coast in international women's football and is controlled by the Ivorian Football Federation. They played their first international match in 1988. The team is currently ranked 64th in the FIFA Women's World Rankings and as the 6th best team in CAF.

China womens national football team Womens national association football team representing the Peoples Republic of China

The China women's national football team, recognized as China PR by FIFA, is governed by the Chinese Football Association. The team is colloquially referred to as "Zhōngguó Nǚzú".

The Czechoslovakia women's national football team was the national women's association football representing Czechoslovakia. It was established in 1968, in the midst of the Prague Spring, making it one of the pioneering women's football national teams.

Netherlands womens national football team Womens national association football team representing the Netherlands

The Netherlands women's national football team is directed by the Royal Dutch Football Association (KNVB), which is a member of UEFA and FIFA.

Norway womens national football team womens national association football team representing Norway

The Norway women's national football team is controlled by the Football Association of Norway. The team is former European, World and Olympic champions and thus one of the most successful national teams. The team has had less success since the 2011 FIFA Women's World Cup.

Group stage

Group A

TeamPtsPldWDLGFGA
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China PR (H)63300111
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada 3311173
Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands 3311142
Flag of Cote d'Ivoire.svg  Ivory Coast 03003117
(H): Hosts

The matches of China were held in Guangzhou. The rest of the matches of this group were held in Foshan.

1 June 1988
China2–0Canada
Netherlands3–0Côte d'Ivoire
3 June 1988
China1–0Netherlands
Canada6–0Côte d'Ivoire
6 June 1988
Canada1–1Netherlands
China8–1Côte d'Ivoire

Group B

TeamPtsPldWDLGFGA
Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil 43201112
Flag of Norway.svg  Norway 4320182
Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia 4320143
Flag of Thailand.svg  Thailand 03003016

All matches held in Jiangmen.

1 June 1988
Norway4–0Thailand
Australia1–0Brazil
3 June 1988
Brazil2–1Norway
Australia3–0Thailand
6 June 1988
Norway3–0Australia
Brazil9–0Thailand

Group C

TeamPtsPldWDLGFGA
Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden 5321051
Flag of the United States.svg  United States 4312063
Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Czechoslovakia 3311122
Flag of Japan.svg  Japan 03003310

All matches held in Panyu.

1 June 1988
United States5–2Japan
Sweden1–0Czechoslovakia
3 June 1988
Sweden1–1United States
Czechoslovakia2–1Japan
6 June 1988
Czechoslovakia0–0United States
Sweden3–0Japan

Ranking of third-placed teams

PosTeamPldWDLGFGAGDPts
1Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia 32014314
2Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands 31114223
3Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Czechoslovakia 31112203

Knockout stage

Bracket

 
Quarter-finalsSemi-finalsFinal
 
          
 
8 June — Guangzhou
 
 
Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden 1
 
10 June — Panyu
 
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada 0
 
Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden 2
 
8 June — Guangzhou
 
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China PR 1
 
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China PR 7
 
12 June — Guangzhou
 
Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia 0
 
Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden 0
 
8 June — Foshan
 
Flag of Norway.svg  Norway 1
 
Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil 2
 
10 June — Guangzhou
 
Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands 1
 
Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil 1
 
8 June — Panyu
 
Flag of Norway.svg  Norway 2 Third place
 
Flag of the United States.svg  United States 0
 
12 June — Guangzhou
 
Flag of Norway.svg  Norway 1
 
Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil 0 (4)
 
 
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China PR 0 (3)
 

Quarter-finals

Sweden  Flag of Sweden.svg1–0Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada

China PR  Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg7–0Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia

Brazil  Flag of Brazil.svg2–1Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands

Semi-finals

Sweden  Flag of Sweden.svg2–1Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China PR

Norway  Flag of Norway.svg2–1Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil

Third place play-off

Brazil  Flag of Brazil.svg0–0Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China PR
Penalties
4–3

Final

Sweden  Flag of Sweden.svg0–1Flag of Norway.svg  Norway
Norway Report
Sweden Report
Medalen Soccerball shade.svg 58'
Tianhe Stadium, Guangzhou
Attendance: 30,000 (according to Norway)
35,000 (according to Sweden)
Referee: Romualdo Arppi Filho (Brazil)
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Sweden
Kit left arm nor91h.png
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Norway
Flag of Sweden.svg
SWEDEN:
GK1 Elisabeth Leidinge
DF3 Marie Karlsson
DF4 Pia Syrén
DF5 Eva Zeikfalvy Sub off.svg
MF6 Ingrid Johansson (c)
MF7 Pia Sundhage
MF9 Pärnilla Larsson
FW11 Anneli Gustafsson
FW13 Anneli Andelén
FW14 Helen Johansson Sub off.svg
MF16 Gunilla Axén
Substitutes:
MF8 Camilla Andersson Sub on.svg
DF14 Tina Nilsson Sub on.svg
FW10 Lena Videkull
GK12 Ing-Marie Olsson
MF17 Anette Palm
Manager:
Gunilla Paijkull
Flag of Norway.svg
NORWAY:
GK1 Hege Ludvigsen
DF2 Cathrine Zaborowski
DF3 Liv Strædet
MF4 Bjørg Storhaug
DF5 Gunn Nyborg
DF6 Toril Hoch-Nielsen Sub off.svg
MF7 Tone Haugen
MF8 Heidi Støre (c)
FW9 Birthe Hegstad
FW10 Ellen Scheel
FW11 Linda Medalen Sub off.svg
Substitutes:
GK12 Reidun Seth
FW13 Lisbeth Bakken
FW14 Turid Storhaug Sub on.svg
MF15 Agnete Carlsen
FW16 Sissel Grude Sub on.svg
Managers:
Dag Steinar Vestlund
Erling Hokstad

All-Star Team

The all star team was voted by the Chinese press. [3]

The Media of the People's Republic of China consists primarily of television, newspapers, radio, and magazines. Since 2000, the Internet has also emerged as an important form of communication by media, and is placed under the supervision of the Chinese government.

See also

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References