1995 FIFA Women's World Cup

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1995 FIFA Women's World Cup
Världsmästerskapet i fotboll för damer 1995
1995 FIFA Women's World Cup.png
Official logo
Tournament details
Host countrySweden
Dates5–18 June
Teams12 (from 6 confederations)
Venue(s)5 (in 5 host cities)
Final positions
ChampionsFlag of Norway.svg  Norway (1st title)
Runners-upFlag of Germany.svg  Germany
Third placeFlag of the United States.svg  United States
Fourth placeFlag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China PR
Tournament statistics
Matches played26
Goals scored99 (3.81 per match)
Attendance112,213 (4,316 per match)
Top scorer(s) Flag of Norway.svg Ann Kristin Aarønes (6 goals)
Best player(s) Flag of Norway.svg Hege Riise
Fair play awardFlag of Sweden.svg  Sweden
1991
1999

The 1995 FIFA Women's World Cup, the second edition of the FIFA Women's World Cup, was held in Sweden and won by Norway, who became the first European nation to win the Women's World Cup. [1] [2] [3] The tournament featured 12 women's national teams from six continental confederations. The 12 teams were drawn into three groups of four and each group played a round-robin tournament. At the end of the group stage, the top two teams and two best third-ranked teams advanced to the knockout stage, beginning with the quarter-finals and culminating with the final at Råsunda Stadium on 18 June 1995.

Contents

Sweden became the first country to host both men's and women's World Cup, having hosted the men's in 1958.

Australia, Canada, and England made their debuts in the competition. The tournament also hosted as qualification for the 1996 Summer Olympics, with the eight quarter-finalists being invited to the Olympics. In the second edition of the Women's World Cup, matches were lengthened to the standard 90 minutes, and three points were awarded for a win. [4]

Summary

Bulgaria was originally awarded hosting rights for the tournament, but had to relinquish the rights and FIFA ended up awarding the tournament to Sweden. [5] About 112,000 tickets were sold for the entire tournament. [6]

As a FIFA rules experiment, each team was allowed a two-minute time out each half. [7]

Norway won the 1995 title, with one in four Norwegians watching the game on television. Norway's team plane was escorted back to Oslo by two F-16s on their way to a victory celebration. [8]

Venues

Teams

Qualifying countries and their results of the 1995 Women's World Cup FIFA Womens World Cup 1995.png
Qualifying countries and their results of the 1995 Women's World Cup

As in the previous edition of the FIFA Women's World cup, held in 1991, 12 teams participated in the final tournament. The teams were:

Squads

For a list of the squads that disputed the final tournament, see 1995 FIFA Women's World Cup squads.

Match officials

Notes

  1. Also served as an assistant referee for one match.

Draw

The draw for the group stage was held on 18 February 1995 in a public ceremony at the Elite Hotel Marina Plaza in Helsingborg, Sweden. The draw was conducted by Sepp Blatter, then the FIFA General Secretary, and assisted by Swedish internationals Tomas Brolin and Kristin Bengtsson, winners of the 1994 Guldbollen and Diamantbollen, respectively. There was no television coverage of the draw. [9]

Group stage

Teams were awarded three points for a win, one point for a draw, and none for a defeat. [4]

Group A

PosTeamPldWDLGFGAGDPtsQualification
1Flag of Germany.svg  Germany 320194+56Advance to knockout stage
2Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden (H)320153+26
3Flag of Japan.svg  Japan 31022423
4Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil 31023853
Source: FIFA
(H) Host
Germany  Flag of Germany.svg 1–0 Flag of Japan.svg  Japan
Report
Tingvalla IP, Karlstad
Attendance: 3,824
Referee: Petros Mathabela (South Africa)
Sweden  Flag of Sweden.svg 0–1 Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil
Report
Olympia, Helsingborg
Attendance: 14,500
Referee: Sonia Denoncourt (Canada)

Sweden  Flag of Sweden.svg 3–2 Flag of Germany.svg  Germany
Report
Olympia, Helsingborg
Attendance: 5,855
Referee: Linda May Black (New Zealand)
Brazil  Flag of Brazil.svg 1–2 Flag of Japan.svg  Japan
Report

Sweden  Flag of Sweden.svg 2–0 Flag of Japan.svg  Japan
Report
Arosvallen, Västerås
Attendance: 7,811
Referee: Petros Mathabela (South Africa)
Brazil  Flag of Brazil.svg 1–6 Flag of Germany.svg  Germany
Report
Tingvalla IP, Karlstad
Attendance: 3,203
Referee: Alain Hamer (Luxembourg)

Group B

PosTeamPldWDLGFGAGDPtsQualification
1Flag of Norway.svg  Norway 3300170+179Advance to knockout stage
2Flag of England.svg  England 32016606
3Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada 301251381
4Flag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria 301251491
Source: FIFA
Norway  Flag of Norway.svg 8–0 Flag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria
Report
Tingvalla IP, Karlstad
Attendance: 4,344
Referee: Alain Hamer (Luxembourg)
England  Flag of England.svg 3–2 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada
Report
Olympia, Helsingborg
Attendance: 655
Referee: Eva Ödlund (Sweden)

Norway  Flag of Norway.svg 2–0 Flag of England.svg  England
Report
Tingvalla IP, Karlstad
Attendance: 5,520
Referee: Eduardo Gamboa (Chile)
Nigeria  Flag of Nigeria.svg 3–3 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada
Report
Olympia, Helsingborg
Attendance: 250
Referee: Pirom Un-prasert (Thailand)

Norway  Flag of Norway.svg 7–0 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada
Report
Strömvallen, Gävle
Attendance: 2,715
Referee: Maria Edilene Siqueira (Brazil)
Nigeria  Flag of Nigeria.svg 2–3 Flag of England.svg  England
Report
Tingvalla IP, Karlstad
Attendance: 1,843
Referee: Ingrid Jonsson (Sweden)

Group C

PosTeamPldWDLGFGAGDPtsQualification
1Flag of the United States.svg  United States 321094+57Advance to knockout stage
2Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China PR 3210106+47
3Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark 310265+13
4Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia 3003313100
Source: FIFA

Group C started with back-and-forth 3–3 draw between the United States and China with the Chinese coming back from a 3–1 deficit. Denmark's opening 5–0 win over Australia, in which Sonia Gegenhuber was sent off in the 45th minute for the Aussies, ultimately led to their securing one of the best third place runner up spots as they would lose their next two matches. [10]

United States goalkeeper Brianna Scurry was sent off in the 88th minute of the second group game against Denmark. With all three substitutions used, U.S. manager Tony DiCicco called upon striker Mia Hamm to play goalkeeper. Hamm made two saves over eight minutes of stoppage time to secure the 2–0 win. [11] In the other game, Angela Iannotta scored Australia's first-ever World Cup goal, but China defeated the Matildas 4–2. [10]

United States  Flag of the United States.svg 3–3 Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China PR
Report
Strömvallen, Gävle
Attendance: 4,635
Referee: Ingrid Jonsson (Sweden)
Denmark  Flag of Denmark.svg 5–0 Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia
Report
Arosvallen, Västerås
Attendance: 1,500
Referee: Bente Skogvang (Norway)

United States  Flag of the United States.svg 2–0 Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark
Report
Strömvallen, Gävle
Attendance: 2,704
Referee: Engage Camara (Guinea)
China PR  Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg 4–2 Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia
Report
Arosvallen, Västerås
Attendance: 1,500
Referee: Maria Edilene Siqueira (Brazil)

United States  Flag of the United States.svg 4–1 Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia
Report
Olympia, Helsingborg
Attendance: 1,105
Referee: Pirom Un-prasert (Thailand)
China PR  Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg 3–1 Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark
Report
Arosvallen, Västerås
Attendance: 1,619
Referee: Eduardo Gamboa (Chile)

Ranking of third-placed teams

PosGrpTeamPldWDLGFGAGDPtsQualification
1 C Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark 310265+13Advance to knockout stage
2 A Flag of Japan.svg  Japan 31022423
3 B Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada 301251381
Source: FIFA
Rules for classification: 1) Points; 2) Goal difference; 3) Goals scored.

Knockout stage

Bracket

 
Quarter-finals Semi-finals Final
 
          
 
13 June – Västerås
 
 
Flag of Germany.svg  Germany 3
 
15 June – Helsingborg
 
Flag of England.svg  England 0
 
Flag of Germany.svg  Germany 1
 
13 June – Helsingborg
 
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China PR 0
 
Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden 1 (3)
 
18 June – Solna
 
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China PR (p)1 (4)
 
Flag of Germany.svg  Germany 0
 
13 June – Gävle
 
Flag of Norway.svg  Norway 2
 
Flag of Japan.svg  Japan 0
 
15 June – Västerås
 
Flag of the United States.svg  United States 4
 
Flag of the United States.svg  United States 0
 
13 June – Karlstad
 
Flag of Norway.svg  Norway 1 Third place play-off
 
Flag of Norway.svg  Norway 3
 
17 June – Gävle
 
Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark 1
 
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China PR 0
 
 
Flag of the United States.svg  United States 2
 

Quarter-finals

Japan  Flag of Japan.svg 0–4 Flag of the United States.svg  United States
Report
Strömvallen, Gävle
Attendance: 3,756
Referee: Eduardo Gamboa (Chile)

Norway  Flag of Norway.svg 3–1 Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark
Report
Tingvalla IP, Karlstad
Attendance: 4,655
Referee: Pirom Un-prasert (Thailand)

Germany  Flag of Germany.svg 3–0 Flag of England.svg  England
Report
Arosvallen, Västerås
Attendance: 2,317
Referee: Bente Skogvang (Norway)

Semi-finals

United States  Flag of the United States.svg 0–1 Flag of Norway.svg  Norway
Report
Arosvallen, Västerås
Attendance: 2,893
Referee: Alain Hamer (Luxembourg)

Germany  Flag of Germany.svg 1–0 Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China PR
Report
Olympia, Helsingborg
Attendance: 3,693
Referee: Petros Mathabela (South Africa)

Third place play-off

China PR  Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg 0–2 Flag of the United States.svg  United States
Report
Strömvallen, Gävle
Attendance: 4,335
Referee: Sonia Denoncourt (Canada)

Final

Germany  Flag of Germany.svg 0–2 Flag of Norway.svg  Norway
Report
Råsunda Stadium, Solna
Attendance: 17,158
Referee: Ingrid Jonsson (Sweden)

Awards

The following awards were given at the conclusion of the tournament: [12]

Golden BallSilver BallBronze Ball
Flag of Norway.svg Hege Riise Flag of Norway.svg Gro Espeseth Flag of Norway.svg Ann Kristin Aarønes
Golden ShoeSilver ShoeBronze Shoe
Flag of Norway.svg Ann Kristin Aarønes Flag of Norway.svg Hege Riise Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg Shi Guihong
6 goals, 0 assists5 goals, 5 assists3 goals, 2 assists
FIFA Fair Play Award
Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden

Statistics

Goalscorers

There were 99 goals scored in 26 matches, for an average of 3.81 goals per match. Ann Kristin Aarønes of Norway won the Golden Shoe award for scoring six goals.

6 goals

5 goals

3 goals

2 goals

1 goal

Assists

6 assists

5 assists

3 assists

2 assists

1 assist

Source: FIFA Technical Report [13]

Tournament ranking

Per statistical convention in football, matches decided in extra time are counted as wins and losses, while matches decided by penalty shoot-outs are counted as draws. Teams eliminated in the quarter-finals are ranked by their quarter-final goal differential.

PosGrpTeamPldWDLGFGAGDPtsFinal result
1 B Flag of Norway.svg  Norway 6600231+2218Champions
2 A Flag of Germany.svg  Germany 6402136+712Runners-up
3 C Flag of the United States.svg  United States 6411155+1013Third place
4 C Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China PR 62221110+18Fourth place
5 A Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden (H)421164+27Eliminated in
quarter-finals
6 B Flag of England.svg  England 42026936
7 C Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark 41037813
8 A Flag of Japan.svg  Japan 41032863
9 A Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil 31023853Eliminated in
group stage
10 B Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada 301251381
11 B Flag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria 301251491
12 C Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia 3003313100
Source: FIFA Technical Report [14]
(H) Host

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The 2016 season was the 119th season of competitive football in Sweden. Sweden was participating in qualifying for the 2018 FIFA World Cup after UEFA Euro 2016.

England at the FIFA Womens World Cup

England have participated five times at the FIFA Women's World Cup: in 1995, 2007, 2011, 2015 and 2019. They have reached the quarter-finals three times and the semi-finals twice.

United States at the FIFA Womens World Cup

The United States women's national soccer team is the most successful women's national team in the history of the Women's World Cup, having won four titles, earning second-place once and third-place finishes three times. The United States is one of the countries besides Germany, Japan, and Norway to win a FIFA Women's World Cup. The United States are also the only team that has played the maximum number of matches possible in every tournament.

Japan at the FIFA Womens World Cup

The Japan women's national football team has represented Japan at the FIFA Women's World Cup on eight occasions in 1991, 1995, 1999, 2003, 2007, 2011, 2015 and 2019. They are the only Asian team to have won the tournament and they are the only team that has won the trophy with a loss during the final tournament. They also were runners-up once.

The Germany women's national football team has represented Germany at the FIFA Women's World Cup on eight occasions in 1991, 1995, 1999, 2003, 2007, 2011, 2015 and 2019. They have won the title twice and were runners-up once. They also reached the fourth place in 1991 and in 2015.

The Norway women's national football team has represented Norway at the FIFA Women's World Cup on eight occasions in 1991, 1995, 1999, 2003, 2007, 2011, 2015 and 2019. They were runners up in 1991. They won the following tournament in 1995. They also reached the fourth place in 1999 and in 2007.

The China women's national football team has represented China at the FIFA Women's World Cup on seven occasions in 1991, 1995, 1999, 2003, 2007, 2015 and 2019, finishing as runners up once (1999) and once in fourth place (1995).

Brazil at the FIFA Womens World Cup

The Brazil women's national football team has represented Brazil at the FIFA Women's World Cup on eight occasions in 1991, 1995, 1999, 2003, 2007, 2011, 2015 and 2019. They were runners-up once. They also reached the third place once.

Sweden at the FIFA Womens World Cup

The Sweden women's national football team has represented Sweden at the FIFA Women's World Cup on eight occasions in 1991, 1995, 1999, 2003, 2007,2011, 2015 and 2019. There were runners up once and three times bronze medalists: in 1991, in 2011 and in 2019

Group A of the 1995 FIFA Women's World Cup took place from 5 to 9 June 1995. The group consisted of Brazil, Germany, Japan and hosts Sweden.

Group B of the 1995 FIFA Women's World Cup took place from 6 to 10 June 1995. The group consisted of Canada, England, Nigeria and Norway.

Group C of the 1995 FIFA Women's World Cup took place from 6 to 10 June 1995. The group consisted of Australia, China PR, Denmark and United States.

The knockout stage of the 1995 FIFA Women's World Cup was the second and final stage of the competition, following the group stage. It began on 13 June with the quarter-finals and ended on 18 June 1995 with the final match, held at the Råsunda Stadium in Solna. A total of eight teams advanced to the knockout stage to compete in a single-elimination style tournament.

The Canada women's national soccer team has represented Canada at seven of the eight stagings of the FIFA Women's World Cup. The inaugural tournament in 1991 was the only edition for which they failed to qualify.

The Denmark women's national football team has represented Denmark at the FIFA Women's World Cup on four occasions, in 1991, 1995, 1999, and 2007.

References

  1. "WOMEN'S WORLD CUP; Norway's Rivalry With U.S. Is Intense". The New York Times. 13 June 1999. Retrieved 2 August 2012.
  2. "Norway Women Win World Cup – Chicago Tribune". Articles.chicagotribune.com. 19 June 1995. Retrieved 2 August 2012.
  3. "Raising Their Game: Enjoying it in 1995". YouTube. 14 June 2012. Retrieved 2 August 2012.
  4. 1 2 Williams, Jean (1 November 2007). A Beautiful Game: International Perspectives on Women's Football. Berg Publishers. p. 4. ISBN   978-1-84788-345-2. Some of the terms and conditions had been changed this time: 90 minutes of play instead of 80 in China, a full group of 20 players instead of 18, three points for a win, and the experiment with time out.
  5. Russo, Anthony. "1995 Women's World Cup".
  6. "WOMEN'S WORLD CUP: Soccer's biggest event a week away". Kitsap Sun. 13 June 1999.
  7. Goff, Steven (4 June 1995). "Women's World Cup '95 Sweden". Washington Post.
  8. Longman, Jere (13 June 1999). "WOMEN'S WORLD CUP; Norway's Rivalry With U.S. Is Intense". The New York Times.
  9. "Statistical Kit – The Draw for the FIFA Women's World Cup France 2019" (PDF). FIFA.com. Fédération Internationale de Football Association. 6 December 2018. p. 39. Retrieved 8 January 2020.
  10. 1 2 Peter Georgaras; Steve Darby; Andre Kruger; Thomas Esamie. "Matildas Internationals for 1995". OzFootball.
  11. Yoesting, Travis (4 April 2019). "TBT: Remember When Mia Hamm Played Goalie at the Women's World Cup?". the18.com.
  12. Awards 1995
  13. Statistics – 2nd FIFA Women's World Cup Sweden 1995. FIFA . Zürich. 1995.
  14. "FIFA Women's World Cup 1995 – Technical Report, Part 1: Table" (PDF). FIFA.com. Fédération Internationale de Football Association. p. 14 (15 of PDF). Retrieved 1 July 2019.