1995 FIFA Women's World Cup

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1995 FIFA Women's World Cup
Världsmästerskapet i fotboll för damer 1995
1995 FIFA Women's World Cup.jpg
Official logo
Tournament details
Host countrySweden
Dates5–18 June
Teams12 (from 6 confederations)
Venue(s)5 (in 5 host cities)
Final positions
ChampionsFlag of Norway.svg  Norway (1st title)
Runners-upFlag of Germany.svg  Germany
Third placeFlag of the United States.svg  United States
Fourth placeFlag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China PR
Tournament statistics
Matches played26
Goals scored99 (3.81 per match)
Attendance112,213 (4,316 per match)
Top scorer(s) Flag of Norway.svg Ann-Kristin Aarønes
(6 goals)
Best player(s) Flag of Norway.svg Hege Riise
1991
1999

The 1995 FIFA Women's World Cup, the second edition of the FIFA Women's World Cup, was held in Sweden and won by Norway. [1] [2] [3] The tournament featured 12 women's national teams from six continental confederations. The 12 teams were drawn into three groups of four and each group played a round-robin tournament. At the end of the group stage, the top two teams and two best third-ranked teams advanced to the knockout stage, beginning with the quarter-finals and culminating with the final at Råsunda Stadium on 18 June 1995.

FIFA Womens World Cup international association football competition

The FIFA Women's World Cup is an international football competition contested by the senior women's national teams of the members of Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA), the sport's international governing body. The competition has been held every four years since 1991, when the inaugural tournament, then called the FIFA Women's World Championship, was held in China.

Norway womens national football team womens national association football team representing Norway

The Norway women's national football team is controlled by the Football Association of Norway. The team is former European, World and Olympic champions and thus one of the most successful national teams. The team has had less success since the 2011 FIFA Women's World Cup.

A round-robin tournament is a competition in which each contestant meets all other contestants in turn. A round-robin contrasts with an elimination tournament, in which participants are eliminated after a certain number of losses.

Contents

Sweden became the first country to host both men's and women's World Cup, having hosted the men's in 1958.

FIFA World Cup association football competition for mens national teams

The FIFA World Cup, often simply called the World Cup, is an international association football competition contested by the senior men's national teams of the members of the Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA), the sport's global governing body. The championship has been awarded every four years since the inaugural tournament in 1930, except in 1942 and 1946 when it was not held because of the Second World War. The current champion is France, which won its second title at the 2018 tournament in Russia.

1958 FIFA World Cup 1958 edition of the FIFA World Cup

The 1958 FIFA World Cup, the sixth staging of the World Cup, was hosted by Sweden from 8 to 29 June. The tournament was won by Brazil, who beat Sweden 5–2 in the final in the Stockholm suburb of Solna for their first title. The tournament is also notable for marking the debut on the world stage of a then 17-year-old Pelé.

Venues

Teams

Qualifying countries and their results of the 1995 Women's World Cup FIFA Womens World Cup 1995.png
Qualifying countries and their results of the 1995 Women's World Cup

As in the previous edition of the FIFA Women's World cup, held in 1991, 12 teams participated in the final tournament. The teams were:

1991 FIFA Womens World Cup 1991 edition of the FIFA Womens World Cup

The 1991 FIFA Women's World Cup was the inaugural FIFA Women's World Cup, the world championship for women's national association football teams. It took place in Guangdong, China from 16 to 30 November 1991. FIFA, football's international governing body selected China as host nation as Guangdong had hosted a prototype world championship three years earlier, the 1988 FIFA Women's Invitation Tournament. Matches were played in the state capital, Guangzhou, as well as in Foshan, Jiangmen and Zhongshan. The competition was sponsored by Mars, Incorporated. With FIFA still reluctant to bestow their "World Cup" brand, the tournament was officially known as the 1st FIFA World Championship for Women's Football for the M&M's Cup.

Confederation of African Football governing body of association football in Africa

The Confederation of African Football or CAF is the administrative and controlling body for African association football.

Nigeria womens national football team womens national association football team representing Nigeria

The Nigeria national women's football team, nicknamed the Super Falcons, is the national team of Nigeria and is controlled by the Nigeria Football Federation. They won the first seven African championships and through their first twenty years lost only five games to African competition: December 12, 2002 to Ghana in Warri, June 3, 2007 at Algeria, August 12, 2007 to Ghana in an Olympic qualifier, November 25, 2008 at Equatorial Guinea in the semis of the 2008 Women's African Football Championship and May 2011 at Ghana in an All Africa Games qualification match.

Asian Football Confederation governing body of association football in Asia

The Asian Football Confederation (AFC) is the governing body of association football in Asia and Australia. It has 47 member countries, mostly located on the Asian and Australian continent, but excludes the transcontinental countries with territory in both Europe and Asia – Azerbaijan, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Russia, and Turkey – which are instead members of UEFA. Three other states located geographically along the western fringe of Asia – Cyprus, Armenia and Israel – are also UEFA members. On the other hand, Australia, formerly in the OFC, joined the Asian Football Confederation in 2006, and the Oceanian island of Guam, a territory of the United States, is also a member of AFC, in addition to Northern Mariana Islands, one of the Two Commonwealths of the United States. Hong Kong and Macau, although not independent countries, are also members of the AFC.

  • Europe (UEFA)
    Germany womens national football team womens national association football team representing Germany

    The Germany women's national football team is governed by the German Football Association (DFB).

    Sweden women's national football team won the European Competition for Women's Football in 1984, one World Cup-silver (2003), as well as three European Championship-silvers. The team has participated in six Olympic Games, seven World Cups, as well as nine European Championships. Sweden won the bronze medal at the 2011 FIFA Women's World Cup.

  • North America, Central America & Caribbean (CONCACAF)
UEFA international sport governing body

The Union of European Football Associations is the administrative body for association football, futsal and beach soccer in Europe, although several member states are primarily or entirely located in Asia. It is one of six continental confederations of world football's governing body FIFA. UEFA consists of 55 national association members.

Denmark womens national football team womens national association football team representing Denmark

The Denmark women's national football team represents Denmark in international women's football. The team is controlled by the Danish Football Association (DBU).

The England women's national football team has been governed by the Football Association (FA) since 1993, having been previously administered by the Women's Football Association (WFA). England played its first international match in November 1972 against Scotland. Although most national football teams represent a sovereign state, as a member of the United Kingdom's Home Nations, England is permitted by FIFA statutes to maintain its own national side that competes in all major tournaments, with the exception of the Women's Olympic Football Tournament.

Squads

For a list of the squads that disputed the final tournament, see 1995 FIFA Women's World Cup squads.

Match officials

Group stage

Group A

PosTeamPldWDLGFGAGDPts
1Flag of Germany.svg  Germany 320194+56
2Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden (H)320153+26
3Flag of Japan.svg  Japan 310224−23
4Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil 310238−53

(H): Host.

Sweden  Flag of Sweden.svg0–1Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil
(Report) Roseli Soccerball shade.svg 37'
Attendance: 14,500
Referee: Denoncourt (Canada)
Germany  Flag of Germany.svg1–0Flag of Japan.svg  Japan
Neid Soccerball shade.svg 23' (Report)
Attendance: 3,824
Sweden  Flag of Sweden.svg3–2Flag of Germany.svg  Germany
Andersson Soccerball shade.svg 65' (pen.)Soccerball shade.svg 86'
Sundhage Soccerball shade.svg 80'
(Report) Wiegmann Soccerball shade.svg 9' (pen.)
Lohn Soccerball shade.svg 42'
Attendance: 5,855
Referee: Black (New Zealand)
Brazil  Flag of Brazil.svg1–2Flag of Japan.svg  Japan
Pretinha Soccerball shade.svg 7' (Report) Noda Soccerball shade.svg 13', 45'
Attendance: 2,286
Referee: Hepburn (United States)
Sweden  Flag of Sweden.svg2–0Flag of Japan.svg  Japan
Videkull Soccerball shade.svg 66'
Andelen Soccerball shade.svg 88'
(Report)
Attendance: 7,811
Brazil  Flag of Brazil.svg1–6Flag of Germany.svg  Germany
Roseli Soccerball shade.svg 19' (Report) Prinz Soccerball shade.svg 5'
Meinert Soccerball shade.svg 22'
Wiegmann Soccerball shade.svg 42' (pen.)
Mohr Soccerball shade.svg 78', 89'
Bernhard Soccerball shade.svg 90'
Attendance: 3,203
Referee: Hamer (Luxembourg)

Group B

PosTeamPldWDLGFGAGDPts
1Flag of Norway.svg  Norway 3300170+179
2Flag of England.svg  England 32016606
3Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada 3012513−81
4Flag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria 3012514−91
Norway  Flag of Norway.svg8–0Flag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria
Sandberg Soccerball shade.svg 30', 44', 82'
Riise Soccerball shade.svg 49'
Aarønes Soccerball shade.svg 60', 90'
Medalen Soccerball shade.svg 67'
Svensson Soccerball shade.svg 76' (pen.)
(Report)
Attendance: 4,344
Referee: Hamer (Luxembourg)
England  Flag of England.svg3–2Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada
Coultard Soccerball shade.svg 51' (pen.), 85'
Spacey Soccerball shade.svg 76' (pen.)
(Report) Stoumbos Soccerball shade.svg 87'
Donnelly Soccerball shade.svg 90+1'
Attendance: 655
Referee: Oedlund (Sweden)
Norway  Flag of Norway.svg2–0Flag of England.svg  England
Haugen Soccerball shade.svg 7'
Riise Soccerball shade.svg 37'
(Report)
Attendance: 5,520
Nigeria  Flag of Nigeria.svg3–3Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada
Nwadike Soccerball shade.svg 26'
Avre Soccerball shade.svg 60'
Okoroafor Soccerball shade.svg 77'
(Report) Burtini Soccerball shade.svg 12', 55'
Donnelly Soccerball shade.svg 20'
Attendance: 250
Referee: Un-Prasert (Thailand)
Norway  Flag of Norway.svg7–0Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada
Aarønes Soccerball shade.svg 4', 21', 90+3'
Riise Soccerball shade.svg 12'
Pettersen Soccerball shade.svg 71', 89'
Leinan Soccerball shade.svg 84'
(Report)
Attendance: 2,715
Referee: Siqueira (Brazil)
Nigeria  Flag of Nigeria.svg2–3Flag of England.svg  England
Okoroafor Soccerball shade.svg 13'
Nwadike Soccerball shade.svg 74'
(Report) Farley Soccerball shade.svg 10', 38'
Walker Soccerball shade.svg 27'
Attendance: 1,843
Referee: Jonsson (Sweden)

Group C

PosTeamPldWDLGFGAGDPts
1Flag of the United States.svg  United States 321094+57
2Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China PR 3210106+47
3Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark 310265+13
4Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia 3003313−100
United States  Flag of the United States.svg3–3Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China PR
Venturini Soccerball shade.svg 22'
Milbrett Soccerball shade.svg 34'
Hamm Soccerball shade.svg 51'
(Report) Liping Soccerball shade.svg 38'
Wei Soccerball shade.svg 74'
Sun Soccerball shade.svg 79'
Attendance: 4,635
Referee: Jonsson (Sweden)
Denmark  Flag of Denmark.svg5–0Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia
Krogh Soccerball shade.svg 12', 48'
Nielsen Soccerball shade.svg 25'
Jensen Soccerball shade.svg 37'
Hansen Soccerball shade.svg 86'
(Report)
Attendance: 1,500
Referee: Skovgang (Norway)
United States  Flag of the United States.svg2–0Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark
Lilly Soccerball shade.svg 9'
Milbrett Soccerball shade.svg 49'
(Report)
Attendance: 2,740
Referee: Camara (Guinea)
China PR  Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg4–2Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia
Zhou Soccerball shade.svg 23'
Shi Soccerball shade.svg 54', 78'
Liu Soccerball shade.svg 90+3'
(Report) Iannotta Soccerball shade.svg 25'
Hughes Soccerball shade.svg 89'
Attendance: 1,500
Referee: Sequeira (Brazil)
United States  Flag of the United States.svg4–1Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia
Foudy Soccerball shade.svg 69'
Fawcett Soccerball shade.svg 72'
Overbeck Soccerball shade.svg 90+2' (pen.)
Keller Soccerball shade.svg 90+4'
(Report) Casagrande Soccerball shade.svg 54'
Attendance: 1,150
Referee: Prasert (Thailand)
China PR  Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg3–1Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark
Shi Soccerball shade.svg 21'
Sun Soccerball shade.svg 76'
Wei Soccerball shade.svg 90'
(Report) Bonde Soccerball shade.svg 44'
Attendance: 1,619
Referee: Martinez (Chile)

Ranking of third-placed teams

PosTeamPldWDLGFGAGDPts
1Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark 310265+13
2Flag of Japan.svg  Japan 310224−23
3Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada 3012513−81

Knockout stage

Bracket

 
Quarter-finalsSemi-finalsFinal
 
          
 
13 June — Arosvallen
 
 
Flag of Germany.svg  Germany 3
 
15 June — Olympia Stadion
 
Flag of England.svg  England 0
 
Flag of Germany.svg  Germany 1
 
13 June — Olympia Stadion
 
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China PR 0
 
Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden 1 (3)
 
18 June — Råsunda
 
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China PR 1 (4)
 
Flag of Germany.svg  Germany 0
 
13 June — Strömvallen
 
Flag of Norway.svg  Norway 2
 
Flag of the United States.svg  United States 4
 
15 June — Arosvallen
 
Flag of Japan.svg  Japan 0
 
Flag of the United States.svg  United States 0
 
13 June — Tingvallen
 
Flag of Norway.svg  Norway 1Third place
 
Flag of Norway.svg  Norway 3
 
17 June — Strömvallen
 
Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark 1
 
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China PR 0
 
 
Flag of the United States.svg  United States 2
 

Quarter-finals

Germany  Flag of Germany.svg3–0Flag of England.svg  England
Voss Soccerball shade.svg 41'
Meinert Soccerball shade.svg 55'
Mohr Soccerball shade.svg 82'
(Report)
Attendance: 2,317
Referee: Skogvang (Norway)

Sweden  Flag of Sweden.svg1–1 (a.e.t.)Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China PR
Kalte Soccerball shade.svg 90+3' (Report) Sun Q. Soccerball shade.svg 29'
Penalties
Andersson Soccerball shade cross.svg
Videkull Soccerball shad check.svg
Pohjanen Soccerball shad check.svg
Sundhage Soccerball shad check.svg
Nessvold Soccerball shade cross.svg
3–4Soccerball shad check.svg Wen
Soccerball shad check.svg Huilin
Soccerball shad check.svg Yufeng
Soccerball shad check.svg Qingxia
Soccerball shade cross.svg Ailing
Attendance: 7,537
Referee: Denoncourt (Canada)

United States  Flag of the United States.svg4–0Flag of Japan.svg  Japan
Lilly Soccerball shade.svg 8', 42'
Milbrett Soccerball shade.svg 45'
Venturini Soccerball shade.svg 80'
(Report)
Attendance: 3,756

Norway  Flag of Norway.svg3–1Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark
Espeseth Soccerball shade.svg 21'
Medalen Soccerball shade.svg 64'
Riise Soccerball shade.svg 85'
(Report) Krogh Soccerball shade.svg 86'
Attendance: 4,655
Referee: Un-Prasert (Thailand)

Semi-finals

Germany  Flag of Germany.svg1–0Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China PR
Wiegmann Soccerball shade.svg 88' (Report)
Attendance: 3,693

United States  Flag of the United States.svg0–1Flag of Norway.svg  Norway
(Report) Aarønes Soccerball shade.svg 10'
Attendance: 2,893
Referee: Hamer (Luxembourg)

Third place play-off

China PR  Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg0–2Flag of the United States.svg  United States
(Report) Venturini Soccerball shade.svg 24'
Hamm Soccerball shade.svg 55'
Attendance: 4,335
Referee: Denoncourt (Canada)

Final

Germany  Flag of Germany.svg0–2Flag of Norway.svg  Norway
(Report) Riise Soccerball shade.svg 37'
Pettersen Soccerball shade.svg 40'
Attendance: 17,158
Referee: Jonsson (Sweden)

Awards

The following awards were given for the tournament: [4]

Golden BallSilver BallBronze Ball
Flag of Norway.svg Hege Riise Flag of Norway.svg Gro Espeseth Flag of Norway.svg Ann Kristin Aarønes
Golden ShoeSilver ShoeBronze Shoe
Flag of Norway.svg Ann Kristin Aarønes Flag of Norway.svg Hege Riise Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg Shi Guihong
6 goals5 goals3 goals
FIFA Fair Play Award
Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden

Goal scorers

Ann-Kristin Aarønes of Norway won the Golden Shoe award for scoring six goals. In total, 99 goals were scored by 58 different players, with none of them credited as own goal.[ citation needed ]

6 goals
5 goals
3 goals
2 goals
1 goal

Tournament ranking

RankTeamPldWDLGFGAGDPts
1Flag of Norway.svg  Norway 6600231+2218
2Flag of Germany.svg  Germany 6402136+712
3Flag of the United States.svg  United States 6411155+1013
4Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China PR 63121110+110
Eliminated in the quarter-finals
5Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden 421164+27
6Flag of England.svg  England 420269−36
7Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark 410378−13
8Flag of Japan.svg  Japan 410328−63
Eliminated at the group stage
9Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil 310238−53
10Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada 3012513−81
11Flag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria 3012514−91
12Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia 3003313−100

Table source[ citation needed ]

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References

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  2. "Norway Women Win World Cup – Chicago Tribune". Articles.chicagotribune.com. 19 June 1995. Retrieved 2 August 2012.
  3. "Raising Their Game: Enjoying it in 1995". YouTube. 14 June 2012. Retrieved 2 August 2012.
  4. Awards 1995