762 Pulcova

Last updated
762 Pulcova
762Pulcova-SwRI.gif
762 Pulcova and satellite as seen with adaptive optics in 2000 [1]
Discovery [2]
Discovered by G. N. Neujmin
Discovery date3 September 1913
Designations
(762) Pulcova
Pronunciation /ˈpʊlkəvə/
Named after
Pulkovo Heights
1913 SQ
Main belt
Adjectives Pulcovian /pʊlˈkviən/ [3]
Orbital characteristics [2]
Epoch 31 July 2016 (JD 2457600.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 100.08 yr (36553 d)
Aphelion 3.4801  AU (520.62  Gm) (Q)
Perihelion 2.8291 AU (423.23 Gm) (q)
3.1546 AU (471.92 Gm) (a)
Eccentricity 0.10319 (e)
5.60 yr (2046.5 d)
348.62° (M)
 10m 33.276s / day (n)
Inclination 13.089° (i)
305.76° (Ω)
189.54° (ω)
Known satellites S/2000 (762) 1 [1]
Earth  MOID 1.84297 AU (275.704 Gm)
Jupiter  MOID 1.60162 AU (239.599 Gm)
TJupiter 3.158
Physical characteristics
Mean radius
68.54±1.6 km
Mass 1.40×1018 kg [4]
Mean density
0.90 g/cm3 [4]
5.839  h (0.2433  d)
Sidereal rotation period
5.839 hr [2]
0.0458±0.002 [2]
11.93 to 14.79 [5]
8.28 [2]

    762 Pulcova is a main-belt asteroid. It was discovered by Grigoriy N. Neujmin in 1913, [2] and is named after Pulkovo Observatory, near Saint Petersburg. Pulcova is 137 km in diameter, [2] and is a C-type asteroid, which means that it is dark in colouring with a carbonate composition.

    Contents

    Photometric observations of this asteroid from Leura, Australia during 2006 gave a light curve with a period of 5.8403 ± 0.0005 hours and a brightness variation of 0.20 ± 0.02 in magnitude. This result is in agreement with previous studies. [6]

    Satellite

    Pulcova and its satellite imaged by the Hubble Space Telescope in January 2005 762 Pulcova Hubble.jpg
    Pulcova and its satellite imaged by the Hubble Space Telescope in January 2005

    On February 22, 2000, [1] astronomers at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope on Mauna Kea, Hawaii, discovered a small, 15-km moon (roughly a 10th the size of the primary) [7] orbiting Pulcova at a distance of 800 km. [8] Its orbital period is 4 days. [9] The satellite is about 4 magnitudes fainter than the primary. [8] It was one of the first asteroid moons to be identified.

    Density

    In the year 2000, Merline estimated Pulcova to have a density of 1.8 g/cm³, which would make it more dense than the trinary asteroid 45 Eugenia, and binary 90 Antiope. [8] But estimates by Marchis in 2008 suggest a density of only 0.90 g/cm³, [4] suggesting it may be a loosely packed rubble pile, not a monolithic object.

    Related Research Articles

    Minor-planet moon Natural satellite of a minor planet

    A minor-planet moon is an astronomical object that orbits a minor planet as its natural satellite. As of October 2020, there are 416 minor planets known or suspected to have moons. Discoveries of minor-planet moons are important because the determination of their orbits provides estimates on the mass and density of the primary, allowing insights of their physical properties that is generally not otherwise possible.

    90 Antiope main-belt double asteroid

    Antiope is a double asteroid in the outer asteroid belt. It was discovered on October 1, 1866, by Robert Luther. In 2000, it was found to consist of two almost-equally-sized bodies orbiting each other. At average diameters of about 88 km and 84 km, both components are among the 500 largest asteroids. Antiope is a member of the Themis family of asteroids that share similar orbital elements.

    45 Eugenia main-belt asteroid

    Eugenia is a large asteroid of the asteroid belt. It is famed as one of the first asteroids to be found to have a moon orbiting it. It is also the second known triple asteroid, after 87 Sylvia.

    <span class="nowrap">1998 WW<sub>31</sub></span> double Kuiper belt object

    1998 WW31, is a non-resonant trans-Neptunian object and binary system from the Kuiper belt located in the outermost region of the Solar System, approximately 148 kilometers (92 miles) in diameter. It was first observed on 18 November 1998, by American astronomer Marc Buie and Robert Millis at the Kitt Peak National Observatory in Arizona, United States. In December 2000, a minor-planet moon, designated S/2000 (1998 WW31) 1 with a diameter of 123 kilometers (76 miles), was discovered in its orbit. After Charon in 1978, it was the first of nearly 100 satellites since discovered in the outer Solar System.

    3749 Balam asteroid

    3749 Balam is a stony Flora asteroid and rare trinary system orbiting in the inner regions of asteroid belt. It also forms a secured asteroid pair with sub-kilometer sized asteroid (312497) 2009 BR60. Balam was discovered on 24 January 1982, by American astronomer Edward Bowell at Lowell's Anderson Mesa Station near Flagstaff, Arizona, and received the prov. designation 1982 BG1. It was named after Canadian astronomer David Balam. Balam measures approximately 4.1 kilometers (2.5 miles) in diameter. Its two minor-planet moons have an estimated diameter of 1.66 and 1.84 kilometers, respectively.

    4674 Pauling, provisional designation 1989 JC, is a spheroidal binary Hungaria asteroid from the innermost regions of the asteroid belt, approximately 4.5 kilometers in diameter. It was discovered by American astronomer Eleanor Helin at the U.S Palomar Observatory, California, on 2 May 1989, and named after American chemist and Nobel Laureate Linus Pauling.

    3034 Climenhaga is a stony Florian asteroid and synchronous binary asteroid from the inner regions of the asteroid belt, approximately 7.8 kilometers in diameter. The asteroid was discovered on 24 September 1917 by German astronomer Max Wolf at Heidelberg Observatory in southwest Germany and assigned provisional designation A917 SE. It was later named after Canadian astrophysicist John Climenhaga. Its minor-planet moon has a period of nearly 19 hours.

    4951 Iwamoto, provisional designation 1990 BM, is a stony, synchronous binary asteroid and slow rotator from the inner regions of the asteroid belt, approximately 5.5 kilometers in diameter. It was discovered on 21 January 1990, by Japanese astronomers Yoshikane Mizuno and Toshimasa Furuta at Kani Observatory in Japan.

    3073 Kursk, provisionally known as 1979 SW11, is a stony Florian asteroid and synchronous binary system from the inner regions of the asteroid belt, approximately 4.7 kilometers in diameter. It was discovered on 24 September 1979, by Soviet astronomer Nikolai Chernykh at the Crimean Astrophysical Observatory in Nauchnyj, on the Crimean peninsula.

    2577 Litva, provisional designation 1975 EE3, is a Hungarian-type Mars-crosser and rare trinary asteroid from the inner regions of the asteroid belt, approximately 4 kilometers in diameter.

    (470308) 2007 JH43, provisional designation 2007 JH43, is a trans-Neptunian object in the outer regions of the Solar System, approximately 500 kilometers in diameter. It was discovered on 10 May 2007, by the U.S. Palomar Observatory in California. The team of unaccredited astronomers at Palomar consisted of Megan E. Schwamb, Michael E. Brown and David L. Rabinowitz

    (528381) 2008 ST291, provisional designation 2008 ST291, is a 1:6 resonant trans-Neptunian object and dwarf planet candidate located in the outermost region of the Solar System that takes almost a thousand years to complete an orbit around the Sun. It was discovered on 24 September 2008 by American astronomers Megan Schwamb, Michael Brown and David Rabinowitz at the Palomar Observatory in California, with no known earlier precovery images.

    15268 Wendelinefroger, provisional designation 1990 WF3, is a stony, spheroidal, and binary Nysian asteroid from the inner regions of the asteroid belt, approximately 3.4 kilometers in diameter.

    (523639) 2010 RE64, provisional designation 2010 RE64, is a trans-Neptunian object in the scattered disc located in the outermost region of the Solar System, approximately 570 kilometers (350 miles) in diameter. It was discovered on 11 July 2010 by the Pan-STARRS-1 survey at the Haleakala Observatory, Hawaii, in the United States. American astronomer Michael Brown considers it a "highly likely" dwarf planet.

    2010 RF43 is a trans-Neptunian object of the scattered disc orbiting in the outermost regions of the Solar System. It measures approximately 650 kilometers (400 mi) in diameter and is a strong dwarf-planet candidate. The object was first observed on 9 September 2010, by American astronomers David Rabinowitz, Megan Schwamb and Suzanne Tourtellotte at ESO's La Silla Observatory in northern Chile.

    (524435) 2002 CY248, provisional designation 2002 CY248, is a trans-Neptunian object and weak dwarf-planet candidate from the classical Kuiper belt in the outermost region of the Solar System, approximately 400–450 kilometers (250–280 mi) in diameter. It was first observed on 6 February 2002, by American astronomer Marc Buie at the Kitt Peak National Observatory in Arizona, United States.

    17246 Christophedumas asteroid

    17246 Christophedumas, provisional designation 2000 GL74, is a stony Koronian asteroid and binary system from the outer regions of the asteroid belt, approximately 4.6 kilometers in diameter.

    (508869) 2002 VT130, provisional designation 2002 VT130, is a trans-Neptunian object and binary system from the classical Kuiper belt, located in the outermost region of the Solar System. It was discovered by American astronomer Marc Buie at Kitt Peak Observatory on 7 November 2002. The primary measures approximately 324 kilometers (201 miles) in diameter.

    22899 Alconrad asteroid

    22899 Alconrad, provisional designation 1999 TO14, is a Koronian asteroid and binary system from the outer region of the asteroid belt, approximately 5 kilometers in diameter. It was discovered on 11 October 1999, by Croatian astronomers Korado Korlević and Mario Jurić at the Višnjan Observatory, Croatia.

    (543354) 2014 AN55 (prov. designation:2014 AN55) is a trans-Neptunian object and a dwarf-planet candidate from the scattered disc, located in the outermost region of the Solar System, that measures approximately 600 kilometres (370 mi) in diameter. It was discovered on 25 January 2014, by astronomers with the Pan-STARRS survey at Haleakala Observatory on the island of Maui, Hawaii, in the United States.

    References

    1. 1 2 3 "762 Pulcova". SwRI. 22 February 2000. Retrieved 20 October 2009. (AO image)
    2. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 762 Pulcova (1913 SQ)" (2009-09-22 last obs). Retrieved 5 May 2016.
    3. Catalogue of the Mathematical, Historical, Bibliographical and Miscellaneous Portion of the Celebrated Library of M. Guglielmo Libri, 1861, p. 216
    4. 1 2 3 Jim Baer (2008). "Recent Asteroid Mass Determinations". Personal Website. Archived from the original on 2 July 2013. Retrieved 28 November 2008.
    5. Magnitudes generated with JPL Horizons for the year 1950 through 2100
    6. Oey, Julian (December 2006), "Lightcurves analysis of 10 asteroids from Leura Observatory", The Minor Planet Bulletin, 33 (4), pp. 96–99, Bibcode:2006MPBu...33...96O.
    7. Dr. William J. Merline & Maria Martinez (26 October 2000). "Astronomers Image Double Asteroid". SwRI Press Release. Retrieved 20 October 2009. (mentions both 90 Antiope and 762 Pulcova)
    8. 1 2 3 W.J. Merline (SwRI); L.M. Close (ESO, U. Arizona); C. Dumas (JPL); J.C. Shelton (Mt. Wilson Obs.); F. Menard (CFHT); C.R. Chapman; et al. (21 June 2000). "Discovery of Companions to Asteroids 762 Pulcova and 90 Antiope by Direct Imaging" (PDF). SwRI. Retrieved 21 October 2009.
    9. Johnston, Robert (1 September 2005). "(762) Pulcova". Johnston's Archive. Retrieved 1 November 2013.