List of minor planets

Last updated

List of minor planets (preview, cut-out).png
The catalog of minor planets is published by the Minor Planet Center and contains more than half a million entries, including 134340 Pluto. [1] For an overview, see index .
Minor planet count.svg
Growing number of minor planets since 1995:
  •   numbered and named bodies
  •   numbered but unnamed bodies
  •   unnumbered bodies (not part of this list)

The following is a list of numbered minor planets in numerical order. With the exception of comets, minor planets are all small bodies in the Solar System, including asteroids, distant objects and dwarf planets. The catalog consists of hundreds of pages, each containing 1000 minor planets. On behalf of the International Astronomical Union, the Minor Planet Center publishes thousands of newly numbered minor planets in its Minor Planet Circulars every year (see index). [1] [2] As of October 2020, there are 546,846 numbered minor planets (secured discoveries) out of a total of 998,030 observed bodies, with the remainder being unnumbered minor planets and comets. [3] [4]

Contents

The catalog's first object is 1 Ceres, discovered by Giuseppe Piazzi in 1801, while its best-known entry is Pluto, listed as 134340 Pluto. The vast majority (97%) of minor planets are asteroids from the asteroid belt (the catalog uses a color code to indicate a body's dynamical classification). There are more than a thousand different minor-planet discoverers observing from a growing list of registered observatories. In terms of numbers, the most prolific discoverers are LINEAR, Spacewatch, MLS, NEAT and CSS. There are also 22,131 named minor planets mostly after people, places and figures from mythology and fiction. [4] Approximately 96% of all numbered catalog entries remain unnamed. (3708) 1974 FV1 and 543315 Asmakhammari are currently the lowest-numbered unnamed and highest-numbered named minor planets, respectively. [1]

It is expected that the upcoming survey by the Vera C. Rubin Observatory (LSST) will discover another 5 million minor planets during the next ten years—a tenfold increase from current numbers. [5] While all main-belt asteroids with a diameter above 10 kilometers have already been discovered, there might be as many as 10 trillion 1-meter-sized asteroids or larger out to the orbit of Jupiter; and more than a trillion minor planets in the Kuiper belt of which hundreds are likely dwarf planets. [5] [6] For minor planets grouped by a particular aspect or property, see § Specific lists .

Description of partial lists

The list of minor planets consists of more than 500 partial lists, each containing 1000 minor planets grouped into 10 tables. The data is sourced from the Minor Planet Center (MPC) and expanded with data from the JPL SBDB (mean-diameter), Johnston's archive (sub-classification) and others (see detailed field descriptions below). For an overview of all existing partial lists, see § Main index .

The information given for a minor planet includes a permanent and provisional designation (§ Designation), a citation that links to the meanings of minor planet names (only if named), the discovery date, location, and credited discoverers (§ Discovery and § Discoverers), a category with a more refined classification than the principal grouping represented by the background color (§ Category), a mean-diameter, sourced from JPL's SBDB or otherwise calculated estimates in italics (§ Diameter), and a reference (Ref) to the corresponding pages at MPC and JPL SBDB.

The MPC may credit one or several astronomers, a survey or similar program, or even the observatory site with the discovery. In the first column of the table, an existing stand-alone article is linked in boldface, while (self-)redirects are never linked. Discoverers, discovery site and category are only linked if they differ from the preceding catalog entry.

Example

Designation Discovery Properties Ref
Permanent Provisional Citation Date Site Discoverer(s) Category Diam.
1890014889 P-L24 September 1960 Palomar PLS 3.4 km MPC  · JPL
1890026760 P-L24 September 1960PalomarPLS NYS 960 m MPC  · JPL
1890033009 T-316 October 1977PalomarPLS5.1 km MPC  · JPL
189004 Capys3184 T-3 Capys 16 October 1977PalomarPLS L5 12 km MPC  · JPL
1890055176 T-316 October 1977PalomarPLS3.5 km MPC  · JPL

The example above shows five catalog entries from one of the partial lists. All five asteroids were discovered at Palomar Observatory by the Palomar–Leiden survey (PLS). The MPC directly credits the survey's principle investigators, that is, the astronomers Cornelis van Houten, Ingrid van Houten-Groeneveld and Tom Gehrels. (This is the only instance where the list of minor planets diverges from the Discovery Circumstances in the official MPC list. [7] ) 189004 Capys, discovered on 16 October 1977, is the only named minor planet. Its background color indicates that it is a Jupiter trojan (from the Trojan camp at Jupiter's L5), estimated to be approximately 12 kilometers in diameter. All other objects are smaller asteroids from the inner (white), central (light-grey) and outer regions (dark grey) of the asteroid belt. The provisional designation for all objects is an uncommon survey designation.

Designation

After discovery, minor planets generally receive a provisional designation, e.g. 1989 AC, then a leading sequential number in parenthesis, e.g. (4179) 1989 AC, turning it into a permanent designation (numbered minor planet). Optionally, a name can be given, replacing the provisional part of the designation, e.g. 4179 Toutatis . (On Wikipedia, named minor planets also drop their parenthesis.)

In modern times, a minor planet receives a sequential number only after it has been observed several times over at least 4 oppositions. [8] Minor planets whose orbits are not (yet) precisely known are known by their provisional designation. This rule was not necessarily followed in earlier times, and some bodies received a number but subsequently became lost minor planets. The 2000 recovery of 719 Albert , which had been lost for nearly 89 years, eliminated the last numbered lost asteroid. [9] Only after a number is assigned is the minor planet eligible to receive a name. Usually the discoverer has up to 10 years to pick a name; many minor planets now remain unnamed. Especially towards the end of the twentieth century, large-scale automated asteroid discovery programs such as LINEAR have increased the pace of discoveries so much that the vast majority of minor planets will most likely never receive names.

For these reasons, the sequence of numbers only approximately matches the timeline of discovery. In extreme cases, such as lost minor planets, there may be a considerable mismatch: for instance the high-numbered 69230 Hermes was originally discovered in 1937, but it was a lost until 2003. Only after it was rediscovered could its orbit be established and a number assigned.

Circle frame.svg

Top 10 discoverers of minor planets account for nearly 90% of all discoveries (as of November 2017; total of 506,410 numbered bodies; corrected MPC-figures). [10] [11]

Discoverers

The MPC credits more than 1000 professional and amateur astronomers as discoverers of minor planets. Many of them have discovered only a few minor planets or even just co-discovered a single one. Moreover, a discoverer does not need to be a human being. There are about 300 programs, surveys and observatories credited as discoverers. Among these, a small group of U.S. programs and surveys actually account for most of all discoveries made so far (see pie chart). As the total of numbered minor planets is growing by the tens of thousands every year, all statistical figures are constantly changing. In contrast to the Top 10 discoverers displayed in this articles, the MPC summarizes the total of discoveries somewhat differently, that is by a distinct group of discoverers. For example, bodies discovered in the Palomar–Leiden Survey are directly credited to the program's principal investigators.

Discovery site

Observatories, telescopes and surveys that report astrometric observations of small Solar System bodies to the MPC receive a numeric or alphanumeric code such as 675 for the Palomar Observatory, or I41 for the Palomar Transient Factory, a dedicated survey that was conducted at Palomar Observatory during 2009–2012. On numbering, such an observatory may directly be credited by the MPC as discoverer.

Category

In this catalog, minor planets are classified into one of 8 principal orbital groups and highlighted with a distinct color. These are:

   Near-Earth obj.      MBA (inner)    MBA (outer)    Centaur
   Mars-crosser    MBA (middle)      Jupiter trojan     Trans-Neptunian obj.

The vast majority of minor planets are evenly distributed between the inner-, central and outer parts of the asteroid belt, which are separated by the two Kirkwood gaps at 2.5 and 2.82  AU. Nearly 97.5% of all minor planets are main-belt asteroids (MBA), while Jupiter trojans, Mars-crossing and near-Earth asteroids each account for 1% or less of the overall population. Only a small number of distant minor planets, that is the centaurs and trans-Neptunian objects, have been numbered so far. In the partial lists, table column "category" further refines this principal grouping:

Principal orbital groups (c) MPs (#)MPs (%)DistributionOrbital criteria
   Near-Earth object (a)2,9180.53%

Circle frame.svgNEOs: 2,918 (0.5%)MCs: 5,461 (1.0%)MBA (inner): 178,290 (32.6%)MBA (middle): 191,932 (35.1%)MBA (outer): 162,347 (29.7%)JTs: 5,057 (0.9%)Centaurs: 129 (0.0%)TNOs: 683 (0.1%)

q < 1.3 AU
   Mars-crosser 5,4611.00%1.3 AU < q < 1.666 AU; a < 3.2 AU
   MBA (inner) 178,29032.60%a < 2.5 AU; q > 1.666 AU
   MBA (middle) 191,93235.10%2.5 AU < a < 2.82 AU; q > 1.666 AU
   MBA (outer) 162,34729.69%2.82 AU < a < 4.6 AU; q > 1.666 AU
   Jupiter trojan 5,0570.92%4.6 AU < a < 5.5 AU; e < 0.3
   Centaur 1290.02%5.5 AU < a < 30.1 AU
   Trans-Neptunian object 6830.12%a > 30.1 AU
Total (numbered)546,846(b)100%Source: JPL's SBDB [11]
(a) NEO-subgroups with number of members: Aten (237), Amor (1,201), Apollo (1,474) and Atira (6) asteroids. [lower-alpha 2]
(b) Including 29 unclassified bodies: 6144 Kondojiro, 8373 Stephengould, 9767 Midsomer Norton, (18916) 2000 OG44, (32511) 2001 NX17, (96177) 1984 BC, (115916) 2003 WB8, (136620) 1994 JC, (144870) 2004 MA8, (241944) 2002 CU147, (275618) 2000 AU242, (301964) 2000 EJ37, (306418) 1998 KK56, (322713) 2000 KD41, (363135) 2001 QQ199, (393350) 1992 RN1, (405058) 2001 TX16, (406803) 2008 UX64, (477587) 2010 JT86, (487496) 2014 SE288, (490171) 2008 UD253, (494667) 2001 WX1, (497009) 2003 BU35, (497619) 2006 QL39, (504160) 2006 SV301, 514107 Kaʻepaokaʻawela, (518509) 2006 FZ51, (524114) 2000 SB1, (526889) 2007 GH6 (colored as    for being unclassified). [lower-alpha 3]
(c) This chart has been created using a classification scheme adopted from and with data provided by the JPL Small-Body Database. [11] [lower-alpha 4]

Diameter

If available, a minor planet's mean diameter in meters (m) or kilometers (km) is taken from the NEOWISE mission of NASA's Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer, which the Small-Body Database has also adopted. [19] Mean diameters are rounded to two significant figures if smaller than 100 kilometers. Estimates are in italics and calculated from a magnitude-to-diameter conversion, using an assumed albedo derived from the body's orbital parameters or, if available, from a family-specific mean albedo (also see asteroid family table). [lower-alpha 5]

Main index

This is an overview of all existing partial lists of numbered minor planets (LoMP). Each table stands for 100,000 minor planets, each cell for a specific partial list of 1,000 sequentially numbered bodies. The data is sourced from the Minor Planet Center. [1] For an introduction, see § top .

Numberings 1–100,000

1–1000 1,001 2,001 3,001 4,001 5,001 6,001 7,001 8,001 9,001
10,001 11,001 12,001 13,001 14,001 15,001 16,001 17,001 18,001 19,001
20,001 21,001 22,001 23,001 24,001 25,001 26,001 27,001 28,001 29,001
30,001 31,001 32,001 33,001 34,001 35,001 36,001 37,001 38,001 39,001
40,001 41,001 42,001 43,001 44,001 45,001 46,001 47,001 48,001 49,001
50,001 51,001 52,001 53,001 54,001 55,001 56,001 57,001 58,001 59,001
60,001 61,001 62,001 63,001 64,001 65,001 66,001 67,001 68,001 69,001
70,001 71,001 72,001 73,001 74,001 75,001 76,001 77,001 78,001 79,001
80,001 81,001 82,001 83,001 84,001 85,001 86,001 87,001 88,001 89,001
90,001 91,001 92,001 93,001 94,001 95,001 96,001 97,001 98,001 99,001

Numberings 100,001–200,000

100,001 101,001 102,001 103,001 104,001 105,001 106,001 107,001 108,001 109,001
110,001 111,001 112,001 113,001 114,001 115,001 116,001 117,001 118,001 119,001
120,001 121,001 122,001 123,001 124,001 125,001 126,001 127,001 128,001 129,001
130,001 131,001 132,001 133,001 134,001 135,001 136,001 137,001 138,001 139,001
140,001 141,001 142,001 143,001 144,001 145,001 146,001 147,001 148,001 149,001
150,001 151,001 152,001 153,001 154,001 155,001 156,001 157,001 158,001 159,001
160,001 161,001 162,001 163,001 164,001 165,001 166,001 167,001 168,001 169,001
170,001 171,001 172,001 173,001 174,001 175,001 176,001 177,001 178,001 179,001
180,001 181,001 182,001 183,001 184,001 185,001 186,001 187,001 188,001 189,001
190,001 191,001 192,001 193,001 194,001 195,001 196,001 197,001 198,001 199,001

Numberings 200,001–300,000

200,001 201,001 202,001 203,001 204,001 205,001 206,001 207,001 208,001 209,001
210,001 211,001 212,001 213,001 214,001 215,001 216,001 217,001 218,001 219,001
220,001 221,001 222,001 223,001 224,001 225,001 226,001 227,001 228,001 229,001
230,001 231,001 232,001 233,001 234,001 235,001 236,001 237,001 238,001 239,001
240,001 241,001 242,001 243,001 244,001 245,001 246,001 247,001 248,001 249,001
250,001 251,001 252,001 253,001 254,001 255,001 256,001 257,001 258,001 259,001
260,001 261,001 262,001 263,001 264,001 265,001 266,001 267,001 268,001 269,001
270,001 271,001 272,001 273,001 274,001 275,001 276,001 277,001 278,001 279,001
280,001 281,001 282,001 283,001 284,001 285,001 286,001 287,001 288,001 289,001
290,001 291,001 292,001 293,001 294,001 295,001 296,001 297,001 298,001 299,001

Numberings 300,001–400,000

300,001 301,001 302,001 303,001 304,001 305,001 306,001 307,001 308,001 309,001
310,001 311,001 312,001 313,001 314,001 315,001 316,001 317,001 318,001 319,001
320,001 321,001 322,001 323,001 324,001 325,001 326,001 327,001 328,001 329,001
330,001 331,001 332,001 333,001 334,001 335,001 336,001 337,001 338,001 339,001
340,001 341,001 342,001 343,001 344,001 345,001 346,001 347,001 348,001 349,001
350,001 351,001 352,001 353,001 354,001 355,001 356,001 357,001 358,001 359,001
360,001 361,001 362,001 363,001 364,001 365,001 366,001 367,001 368,001 369,001
370,001 371,001 372,001 373,001 374,001 375,001 376,001 377,001 378,001 379,001
380,001 381,001 382,001 383,001 384,001 385,001 386,001 387,001 388,001 389,001
390,001 391,001 392,001 393,001 394,001 395,001 396,001 397,001 398,001 399,001

Numberings 400,001–500,000

400,001 401,001 402,001 403,001 404,001 405,001 406,001 407,001 408,001 409,001
410,001 411,001 412,001 413,001 414,001 415,001 416,001 417,001 418,001 419,001
420,001 421,001 422,001 423,001 424,001 425,001 426,001 427,001 428,001 429,001
430,001 431,001 432,001 433,001 434,001 435,001 436,001 437,001 438,001 439,001
440,001 441,001 442,001 443,001 444,001 445,001 446,001 447,001 448,001 449,001
450,001 451,001 452,001 453,001 454,001 455,001 456,001 457,001 458,001 459,001
460,001 461,001 462,001 463,001 464,001 465,001 466,001 467,001 468,001 469,001
470,001 471,001 472,001 473,001 474,001 475,001 476,001 477,001 478,001 479,001
480,001 481,001 482,001 483,001 484,001 485,001 486,001 487,001 488,001 489,001
490,001 491,001 492,001 493,001 494,001 495,001 496,001 497,001 498,001 499,001

Numberings 500,001–600,000

500,001 501,001 502,001 503,001 504,001 505,001 506,001 507,001 508,001 509,001
510,001 511,001 512,001 513,001 514,001 515,001 516,001 517,001 518,001 519,001
520,001 521,001 522,001 523,001 524,001 525,001 526,001 527,001 528,001 529,001
530,001 531,001 532,001 533,001 534,001 535,001 536,001 537,001 538,001 539,001
540,001 541,001 542,001 543,001 544,001 545,001 546,001 547,001 548,001 549,001
550,001 551,001 552,001 553,001 554,001 555,001 556,001 557,001 558,001 559,001
560,001 561,001 562,001 563,001 564,001 565,001 566,001 567,001 568,001 569,001
570,001 571,001 572,001 573,001 574,001 575,001 576,001 577,001 578,001 579,001
580,001 581,001 582,001 583,001 584,001 585,001 586,001 587,001 588,001 589,001
590,001 591,001 592,001 593,001 594,001 595,001 596,001 597,001 598,001 599,001

Minor planets from 600,001 to 700,000

600,001 601,001 602,001 603,001 604,001 605,001 606,001 607,001 608,001 609,001
610,001 611,001 612,001 613,001 614,001 615,001 616,001 617,001 618,001 619,001
620,001 621,001 622,001 623,001 624,001 625,001 626,001 627,001 628,001 629,001
630,001 631,001 632,001 633,001 634,001 635,001 636,001 637,001 638,001 639,001
640,001 641,001 642,001 643,001 644,001 645,001 646,001 647,001 648,001 649,001
650,001 651,001 652,001 653,001 654,001 655,001 656,001 657,001 658,001 659,001
660,001 661,001 662,001 663,001 664,001 665,001 666,001 667,001 668,001 669,001
670,001 671,001 672,001 673,001 674,001 675,001 676,001 677,001 678,001 679,001
680,001 681,001 682,001 683,001 684,001 685,001 686,001 687,001 688,001 689,001
690,001 691,001 692,001 693,001 694,001 695,001 696,001 697,001 698,001 699,001

Minor planets from 700,001 to 800,000

700,001 701,001 702,001 703,001 704,001 705,001 706,001 707,001 708,001 709,001
710,001 711,001 712,001 713,001 714,001 715,001 716,001 717,001 718,001 719,001
720,001 721,001 722,001 723,001 724,001 725,001 726,001 727,001 728,001 729,001
730,001 731,001 732,001 733,001 734,001 735,001 736,001 737,001 738,001 739,001
740,001 741,001 742,001 743,001 744,001 745,001 746,001 747,001 748,001 749,001
750,001 751,001 752,001 753,001 754,001 755,001 756,001 757,001 758,001 759,001
760,001 761,001 762,001 763,001 764,001 765,001 766,001 767,001 768,001 769,001
770,001 771,001 772,001 773,001 774,001 775,001 776,001 777,001 778,001 779,001
780,001 781,001 782,001 783,001 784,001 785,001 786,001 787,001 788,001 789,001
790,001 791,001 792,001 793,001 794,001 795,001 796,001 797,001 798,001 799,001

Minor planets from 800,001 to 900,000

800,001 801,001 802,001 803,001 804,001 805,001 806,001 807,001 808,001 809,001
810,001 811,001 812,001 813,001 814,001 815,001 816,001 817,001 818,001 819,001
820,001 821,001 822,001 823,001 824,001 825,001 826,001 827,001 828,001 829,001
830,001 831,001 832,001 833,001 834,001 835,001 836,001 837,001 838,001 839,001
840,001 841,001 842,001 843,001 844,001 845,001 846,001 847,001 848,001 849,001
850,001 851,001 852,001 853,001 854,001 855,001 856,001 857,001 858,001 859,001
860,001 861,001 862,001 863,001 864,001 865,001 866,001 867,001 868,001 869,001
870,001 871,001 872,001 873,001 874,001 875,001 876,001 877,001 878,001 879,001
880,001 881,001 882,001 883,001 884,001 885,001 886,001 887,001 888,001 889,001
890,001 891,001 892,001 893,001 894,001 895,001 896,001 897,001 898,001 899,001

Minor planets from 900,001 to 1,000,000

900,001 901,001 902,001 903,001 904,001 905,001 906,001 907,001 908,001 909,001
910,001 911,001 912,001 913,001 914,001 915,001 916,001 917,001 918,001 919,001
920,001 921,001 922,001 923,001 924,001 925,001 926,001 927,001 928,001 929,001
930,001 931,001 932,001 933,001 934,001 935,001 936,001 937,001 938,001 939,001
940,001 941,001 942,001 943,001 944,001 945,001 946,001 947,001 948,001 949,001
950,001 951,001 952,001 953,001 954,001 955,001 956,001 957,001 958,001 959,001
960,001 961,001 962,001 963,001 964,001 965,001 966,001 967,001 968,001 969,001
970,001 971,001 972,001 973,001 974,001 975,001 976,001 977,001 978,001 979,001
980,001 981,001 982,001 983,001 984,001 985,001 986,001 987,001 988,001 989,001
990,001 991,001 992,001 993,001 994,001 995,001 996,001 997,001 998,001 999,001


Specific lists

Euler diagram showing the types of bodies in the Solar System (see Small Solar System body). Euler diagram of solar system bodies.svg
Euler diagram showing the types of bodies in the Solar System (see Small Solar System body).

The following are lists of minor planets by physical properties, orbital properties, or discovery circumstances:

See also

Other lists

Notes

  1. Sources for asteroid families determined by the synthetic hierarchical clustering method: for asteroids number 1 to 393,347 (D. Nesvorný 2014, Identification and Dynamical Properties of Asteroid Families ), and for asteroids 393,348 to 494,645 (AstDys as of 2018, Family classification (A. Milani / Z. Knežević 2014). Following 8 families from latter were mapped to family names of former: Hertha→Nysa, Minerva→Gefion, Klytaemnestra→Telramund, Lydia→Padua, Innes→Rafita, Zdenekhorsky→Nemesis, Klumpkea→Tirela, Gantrisch→Lixiaohua, Harig→Witt. All other families at AstDys that are not listed by Nesvorný do not show an abbreviated family name with a linked "Family Identification Number" (FIN). Instead, LoMP-entries for members of these families display the number of the parent body, e.g. (5) for 5 Astraea.
  2. 1 2 Split-up of NEOs into Amor, Aten, Apollo and Atira asteroid is based on the orbital criteria given in adjunct table. The data is sourced from JPL Small-Body Orbital Elements "Numbered Asteroids (50 MB)" file
  3. There are a few minor planets that remain unclassified based on the defined orbital criteria. At least five of these bodies have a semi-major axis too large to be an outer main-belt asteroid, and an orbit too eccentric to be classified as a Jupiter trojan (JPL classifies these bodies simply as "asteroids", while the MPC, which never distinguishes between inner, outer and middle MBAs, classifies them as "main-belt asteroids"). Other unclassified minor planets include Mars-crossers (as per MPC) with a semi-major axis of that of an outer-MBA (as per JPL).
  4. This table adopts the orbital criteria used by the JPL Small-Body Database, with the exception of (1.) using a different limit to categorize asteroids of the intermediate main belt (i.e. a = 2.5–2.82 AU), and (2.) adding another orbital criteria to outer MBAs (q > 1.666 AU).
    The values for an object's perihelion and aphelion need to be derived from the semi-major axis and the eccentricity as they are not provided in the data source (q = a(1-e); Q = a(1+e)).
  5. Diameters are calculated as a function of absolute magnitude (H) and geometric albedo (p) as documented at CNEOS. While "H" is taken from the Ascii files at the Small Body Data Base, the assumed albedo is taken from an asteroid-family specific figure (Nesvorny, synthetic HCM v.3, as shown in table) or, alternatively  for background asteroids, Jupiter trojans, near-Earth and distant objects  from the body's orbital parameters (as per 2. Taxonomic Class, orbital class, and albedo at the LCDB and/or Johnston's Archive). This is: 0.20 (inner MBAs), 0.14 (NEOs), 0.057 (outer MBAs and Jupiter trojans), 0.10 (middle MBAs with a semi-major axis between 2.6 and 2.7 AU), 0.09 (centaurs and TNOs). The conversion formula for a given albedo and abs. magnitude is: pow(10, (3.1236 − (0.5 × log10(p)) − (0.2 × H))).

Related Research Articles

3548 Eurybates

3548 Eurybates is a carbonaceous Jupiter trojan from the Greek camp and the parent body of the Eurybates family, approximately 68 kilometers in diameter. It is a target to be visited by the Lucy mission in August 2027. Discovered during the second Palomar–Leiden Trojan survey in 1973, it was later named after Eurybates from Greek mythology. The C/P-type asteroid belongs to the 60 largest Jupiter trojans and has a rotation period of 8.7 hours. Eurybates has one known satellite, named Queta, that was discovered in images taken by the Hubble Space Telescope in September 2018.

17314 Aisakos is a Jupiter trojan from the Trojan camp, approximately 36 kilometers in diameter. It was discovered at the Palomar Observatory during the first Palomar–Leiden Trojan survey in 1971. The dark Jovian asteroid has a rotation period of 9.7 hours. It was named after the Trojan prince Aesacus from Greek mythology.

37519 Amphios is a Jupiter trojan from the Trojan camp, approximately 33 kilometers in diameter. It was discovered at the Palomar Observatory during the third Palomar–Leiden Trojan survey in 1977. The dark Jovian asteroid is a member of an unnamed asteroid family and has a long rotation period of 50.9 hours. It was named after Amphius from Greek mythology.

4805 Asteropaios is a Jupiter trojan from the Trojan camp, approximately 53 kilometers in diameter. It was discovered on 13 November 1990, by American astronomer Carolyn Shoemaker at the Palomar Observatory in California. The dark Jovian asteroid is one of the 80 largest Jupiter trojans and has a rotation period of 12.4 hours. It was named after the spear-throwing hero Asteropaios, from Greek mythology.

8318 Averroes is a dark Themistian asteroid from the outer regions of the asteroid belt, approximately 10 kilometers in diameter. It was discovered on 29 September 1973, by Dutch astronomers Ingrid and Cornelis van Houten at Leiden, and Tom Gehrels the Palomar Observatory, and assigned the provisional designation 1306 T-2. The likely C-type asteroid was named after medieval Muslim astronomer Averroës.

5655 Barney, provisional designation 1159 T-2, is a Maria asteroid from the central regions of the asteroid belt, approximately 6.5 kilometers in diameter. It was discovered during the second Palomar–Leiden Trojan survey in 1973, and named for American astronomer Ida Barney in 1994. The stony S-type asteroid has a rotation period of 2.66 hours.

3430 Bradfield

3430 Bradfield (prov. designation: 1980 TF4) is a stony Agnia asteroid from the central regions of the asteroid belt, approximately 8 kilometers (5 miles) in diameter. It was discovered on 9 October 1980, by American astronomer Carolyn Shoemaker at the Palomar Observatory in California. The Sq-type asteroid was named after comet hunter William A. Bradfield.

4827 Dares is a larger Jupiter trojan from the Trojan camp, approximately 43 kilometers in diameter. It was discovered on 17 August 1988 by American astronomer Carolyn Shoemaker at the Palomar Observatory in California. The dark D-type asteroid has a rotation period of 19.0 hours. It was named after Dares from Greek mythology.

4007 Euryalos is a larger Jupiter trojan from the Greek camp, approximately 48 kilometers in diameter. It was discovered on 19 September 1973, by Dutch astronomers Ingrid and Cornelis van Houten at Leiden, and Tom Gehrels at Palomar Observatory in California. The likely spherical Jovian asteroid is the principal body of the proposed Euryalos family and has a rotation period of 6.4 hours. It was named after the warrior Euryalus from Greek mythology.

10245 Inselsberg, provisional designation 6071 P-L, is a Gefion asteroid from the central regions of the asteroid belt, approximately 7 kilometers in diameter. It was discovered on 24 September 1960, by Ingrid and Cornelis van Houten at Leiden, and Tom Gehrels at Palomar Observatory in California, United States. The likely S-type asteroid was named for the German mountain Großer Inselsberg.

4138 Kalchas is a large Jupiter trojan from the Greek camp, approximately 53 kilometers in diameter. It was discovered on 19 September 1973, by Dutch astronomers Ingrid and Cornelis van Houten at Leiden, on photographic plates taken by Tom Gehrels at the Palomar Observatory in California. The assumed C-type asteroid is the principal body of the proposed Kalchas family and has a rotation period of 29.2 hours. It was named after the seer Calchas from Greek mythology.

4792 Lykaon is a dark Jupiter trojan from the Trojan camp, approximately 51 kilometers in diameter. It was discovered on 10 September 1988, by American astronomer Carolyn Shoemaker at the Palomar Observatory in California. The possibly elongated Jovian asteroid belongs to the 100 largest Jupiter trojans and has a long rotation period of 40.1 hours. It was named after the Trojan prince Lycaon from Greek mythology.

4754 Panthoos is a Jupiter trojan from the Trojan camp, approximately 53 kilometers in diameter. It was discovered during the third Palomar–Leiden Trojan survey on 16 October 1977, by Ingrid and Cornelis van Houten at Leiden, and Tom Gehrels at the Palomar Observatory in California. It is likely spherical in shape and has a longer-than-average rotation period of 27.68 hours. The assumed C-type asteroid is one of the 80 largest Jupiter trojans. It was named after Panthous (Panthoos) from Greek mythology.

13062 Podarkes is a mid-sized Jupiter trojan from the Greek camp, approximately 29 kilometers in diameter. It was discovered on 19 April 1991, by American astronomer couple Carolyn and Eugene Shoemaker at the Palomar Observatory, California. The dark Jovian asteroid is the principal body of the proposed Podarkes family. It was named after Podarkes from Greek mythology.

9142 Rhesus is a larger Jupiter trojan from the Trojan camp, approximately 42 kilometers in diameter. It was discovered during the third Palomar–Leiden Trojan survey in 1977, and later named after King Rhesus from Greek mythology. The dark D-type asteroid has a rotation period of 7.3 hours.

(5119) 1988 RA1, provisional designation 1988 RA1, is a Jupiter trojan from the Trojan camp, approximately 49 kilometers (30 mi) in diameter. It was discovered on 8 September 1988 by Danish astronomer Poul Jensen at the Brorfelde Observatory near Holbæk, Denmark. The dark Jovian asteroid has a rotation period of 12.8 hours. It has not been named since its numbering in March 1992.

(5476) 1989 TO11, provisional designation 1989 TO11 is a mid-sized Jupiter trojan from the Trojan camp, approximately 35 kilometers (22 miles) in diameter. It was discovered on 2 October 1989, by American astronomer Schelte Bus at the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory in Chile. The dark Jovian asteroid has a rotation period of 5.8 hours. It has not been named since its numbering in March 1993.

(6002) 1988 RO, provisional designation 1988 RO is a mid-sized Jupiter trojan from the Trojan camp, approximately 40 kilometers in diameter. It was discovered by Poul Jensen at the Brorfelde Observatory in 1988, and has not been named since its numbering in June 1994. The dark Jovian asteroid has a rotation period of 12.9 hours.

6144 Kondojiro (1994 EQ3) is an asteroid discovered on March 14, 1994 by Kin Endate and Kazuro Watanabe at the Kitami Observatory in eastern Hokkaidō, Japan. It is named after Jiro Kondo, a Japanese Egyptologist and professor of archaeology at Waseda University.

(12929) 1999 TZ1, provisional designation 1999 TZ1, is a dark Jupiter trojan from the Trojan camp, approximately 54 kilometers (34 miles) in diameter. It was discovered on 2 October 1999, by American astronomer Charles W. Juels at the Fountain Hills Observatory in Arizona. Originally considered a centaur, this now re-classified Jovian asteroid has a rotation period of 9.3 hours and belongs to the 80 largest Jupiter trojans. It has not been named since its numbering in December 1999.

References

  1. 1 2 3 4 "Discovery Circumstances: Numbered Minor Planets". Minor Planet Center. 19 October 2020. Retrieved 20 October 2020.
  2. "MPC/MPO/MPS Archive". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 20 October 2020.
  3. "Latest Published Data". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 20 October 2020.
  4. 1 2 "Minor Planet Statistics – Orbits And Names". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 20 October 2020.
  5. 1 2 Jones, R. Lynne; Juric, Mario; Ivezic, Zeljko (January 2016). "Asteroid Discovery and Characterization with the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope". Asteroids: New Observations. 318: 282–292. arXiv: 1511.03199 . Bibcode:2016IAUS..318..282J. doi:10.1017/S1743921315008510.
  6. Bidstrup, P. R.; Andersen, A. C.; Haack, H.; Michelsen, R. (August 2008). "How to detect another 10 trillion small Main Belt asteroids". Physica Scripta. 130: 014027. Bibcode:2008PhST..130a4027B. doi:10.1088/0031-8949/2008/T130/014027 . Retrieved 16 January 2018.
  7. "Discovery Circumstances: Numbered Minor Planets (185001)–(190000)". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 27 May 2019.
  8. An opposition is the time when a body is at its furthest apparent point from the Sun, and in this case is defined as the time when an asteroid is far enough from the Sun to be observed from the Earth. In most cases, this is about 4 to 6 months a year. Some notable minor planets are exceptions to this rule, such as 367943 Duende .
  9. Cowen, Ron (1 November 2002). "Astronomers Rediscover Long-Lost Asteroid". Science News. Retrieved 6 April 2018.
  10. "Minor Planet Discoverers (by number)". Minor Planet Center. 19 October 2020. Retrieved 20 October 2020.
  11. 1 2 3 "JPL Small-Body Orbital Elements "Numbered Asteroids (59 MB)"". Jet Propulsion Laboratory . Retrieved 22 October 2020.
  12. "Small Bodies Data Ferret". Nesvorny HCM Asteroid Families V3.0. Retrieved 21 February 2019.
  13. "List Of Jupiter Trojans". Minor Planet Center. 11 October 2020. Retrieved 20 October 2020.
  14. "List of the Potentially Hazardous Asteroids (PHAs)". Minor Planet Center. 20 October 2020. Retrieved 20 October 2020.
  15. Johnston, Wm. Robert (18 August 2020). "List of Known Trans-Neptunian Objects". Johnston's Archive. Retrieved 20 October 2020.
  16. "List Of Other Unusual Objects". Minor Planet Center. 20 October 2020. Retrieved 20 October 2020.
  17. Johnston, Wm. Robert (10 October 2020). "Asteroids with Satellites". Johnston's Archive. Retrieved 20 October 2020.
  18. Warner, Brian D.; Harris, Alan W.; Pravec, Petr (July 2009). "The asteroid lightcurve database". Icarus. 202 (1): 134–146. Bibcode:2009Icar..202..134W. doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2009.02.003. (LCDB query form)
  19. "NEOWISE Diameters and Albedos". PDS Small Bodies Node. 11 March 2019. Retrieved 25 June 2019.

Further reading

Minor Planet Center