Antonio Cromartie

Last updated

Antonio Cromartie
Antonio Cromartie 2016.JPG
Cromartie with the Indianapolis Colts in 2016
No. 25, 31
Position: Cornerback
Personal information
Born: (1984-05-17) May 17, 1984 (age 34)
Tallahassee, Florida
Height:6 ft 2 in (1.88 m)
Weight:210 lb (95 kg)
Career information
High school: Lincoln (Tallahassee, Florida)
College: Florida State
NFL Draft: 2006  / Round: 1 / Pick: 19
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Total tackles:416
Forced fumbles:2
Fumble recoveries:5
Pass deflections:116
Interceptions:31
Total touchdowns:6
Player stats at NFL.com
Player stats at PFR

Antonio Cromartie (born April 15, 1984) is a former American football cornerback. He played college football at Florida State and was drafted in the first round (19th overall) by the San Diego Chargers in the 2006 NFL Draft. He was selected to four Pro Bowls and was a first-team All-Pro in 2007 after leading the league in interceptions. Cromartie is credited with the longest play in NFL history, returning a missed field goal 109 yards for a touchdown in 2007. [1] He also played for the Arizona Cardinals, New York Jets and Indianapolis Colts.

American football Team field sport

American football, referred to as football in the United States and Canada and also known as gridiron, is a team sport played by two teams of eleven players on a rectangular field with goalposts at each end. The offense, which is the team controlling the oval-shaped football, attempts to advance down the field by running with or passing the ball, while the defense, which is the team without control of the ball, aims to stop the offense's advance and aims to take control of the ball for themselves. The offense must advance at least ten yards in four downs, or plays, and otherwise they turn over the football to the defense; if the offense succeeds in advancing ten yards or more, they are given a new set of four downs. Points are primarily scored by advancing the ball into the opposing team's end zone for a touchdown or kicking the ball through the opponent's goalposts for a field goal. The team with the most points at the end of a game wins.

Cornerback defensive position in American and Canadian football, covering receivers, to defend against pass offenses and make tackles

A cornerback (CB), also referred to as a corner or defensive halfback in older parlance, is a member of the defensive backfield or secondary in American and Canadian football. Cornerbacks cover receivers most of the time, to defend against offensive plays, i.e create turnovers in best case or deflect a forward pass or rather make a tackle. Other members of the defensive backfield include the safeties and occasionally linebackers. The cornerback position requires speed, agility, and strength. A cornerback's skillset typically requires proficiency in anticipating the quarterback, backpedaling, executing single and zone coverage, disrupting pass routes, block shedding, and tackling. Cornerbacks are among the fastest players on the field.

College football collegiate rules version of American/Canadian football, played by student-athletes of American/Canadian colleges and universities

College football is American football played by teams of student athletes fielded by American universities, colleges, and military academies, or Canadian football played by teams of student athletes fielded by Canadian universities. It was through college football play that American football rules first gained popularity in the United States.

Contents

Early years

Cromartie was born in Tallahassee, Florida, to Haitian American parents. [2] [3] He was a versatile player at Tallahassee's Lincoln High School. Throughout his senior season, Cromartie recorded 12 tackles and 2 interceptions, returned 3 punts and 2 kicks for TDs, had 450 yards and 1 touchdown on 30 catches and ran the ball 13 times for 242 yards and 3 touchdowns. This was enough to earn Cromartie 2002 USA Today defensive player of the year. [4] Considered a four-star recruit by Rivals.com , Cromartie ranked sixth among cornerback prospects in the nation. [5] Cromartie also participated in the 2003 U.S. Army All-American Bowl.

Tallahassee, Florida Capital of Florida

Tallahassee is the capital city of the U.S. state of Florida. It is the county seat and only incorporated municipality in Leon County. Tallahassee became the capital of Florida, then the Florida Territory, in 1824. In 2017, the population was 191,049, making it the 7th-largest city in the U.S state of Florida, and the 126th-largest city in the United States. The population of the Tallahassee metropolitan area was 382,627 as of 2017. Tallahassee is the largest city in the Florida Panhandle region, and the main center for trade and agriculture in the Florida Big Bend and Southwest Georgia regions.

Haitian Americans People of Haitian heritage and diaspora living in the United States

Haitian Americans are Americans of Haitian descent. The largest proportion of Haitians in the United States live in the South Florida area and especially the cities of Tampa and Orlando. In addition, they have settled in major East Coast cities such as New York City, Boston, Philadelphia, and Washington, D.C., and in Chicago in the Midwestern United States. Most are immigrants or their descendants from late 20th-century migrations to the United States. Haitian Americans represent the largest group within the Haitian diaspora.

Lincoln High School is a public high school located in Leon County, Tallahassee, Florida. It offers an accelerated Advanced Placement (AP) program. In 2010, Newsweek ranked Lincoln High School as one of the top 100 high schools in the United States.

Cromartie also ran track in high school and placed 3rd in the 110-metres hurdles and as a member of the 4 x 100-metres relay team at the Class 5A County track meet. He also cleared 14.3 meters in triple jump. [6]

Track and field is an exercise which includes athletic contests established on the skills of running, jumping, and throwing. The name is derived from the sport's typical venue: a stadium with an oval running track enclosing a grass field where the throwing and some of the jumping events take place. Track and field is categorized under the umbrella sport of athletics, which also includes road running, cross country running, and race walking.

Triple jump track and field event

The triple jump, sometimes referred to as the hop, step and jump or the hop, skip and jump, is a track and field event, similar to the long jump. As a group, the two events are referred to as the "horizontal jumps". The competitor runs down the track and performs a hop, a bound and then a jump into the sand pit. The triple jump was inspired by the ancient Olympic Games and has been a modern Olympics event since the Games' inception in 1896.

College career

Cromartie decided to stay close to home for college and accepted an athletic scholarship offer from Florida State University, where he played for coach Bobby Bowden's Florida State Seminoles football team from 2003 to 2004. After flashing playmaking potential as a nickelback and kick returner his first two years, Cromartie tore the anterior cruciate ligament in his left knee in July 2005 during voluntary workouts before his junior year and was forced to miss the entire 2005 season. He was potentially going to play at wide receiver during his junior year. [7]

Florida State University university in the United States

Florida State University is a public space-grant and sea-grant research university in Tallahassee, Florida. It is a senior member of the State University System of Florida. Founded in 1851, it is located on the oldest continuous site of higher education in the state of Florida.

Bobby Bowden American football player and coach

Robert Cleckler Bowden is a retired American football coach. Bowden is best known for coaching the Florida State Seminoles football team from the 1976 to 2009 seasons.

Florida State Seminoles football College Football Bowl Subdivision team; member of Atlantic Coast Conference

The Florida State Seminoles football team represents Florida State University in the sport of American football. The Seminoles compete in the NCAA Division I Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS) of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) and the Atlantic Division of the Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC). The team is known for its storied history, distinctive helmet, fight song and colors as well as the many traditions associated with the school.

In addition to football, Cromartie also joined the Florida State Seminoles track team in 2004. He was a member of the FSU track team that won the ACC Championship in 2004, where he placed 10th in the 200 meters with a time of 21.35 seconds. [8] He ran a career-best time of 46.39 seconds in the 400 meters at the NCAA Division I Championships, placing 6th in the prelims. [9] He was timed at 21.27 seconds in the 200 meters.

Professional career

2006 NFL Combine

Pre-draft measurables
HtWtArm lengthHand size 40-yard dash 10-yd split20-yd split 20-ss 3-cone Vert jump Broad BP
6 ft 2 in
(1.88 m)
208 lb
(94 kg)
33 in
(0.84 m)
10 in
(0.25 m)
4.50 s1.58 s2.70 s7.02 s38 in
(0.97 m)
11 ft 0 in
(3.35 m)
18 reps
All values except shuttle from NFL Combine [10]

Despite being removed from competitive football for an entire year, Cromartie was still selected as the 19th overall pick of the first round of the 2006 NFL Draft by the Chargers based on his great potential.[ citation needed ]

2006 NFL Draft

The 2006 National Football League Draft, the 71st in league history, took place in New York City, New York, at Radio City Music Hall on April 29 and April 30, 2006. For the 27th consecutive year, the draft was telecast on ESPN and ESPN2, with additional coverage offered by ESPNU and, for the first time, by the NFL Network. Having signed a contract with the Houston Texans on the evening before the draft, Mario Williams, a defensive end from North Carolina State, became the draft’s first pick. The selection surprised many commentators, who predicted that the Texans would draft Southern California running back Reggie Bush or Texas quarterback Vince Young. Ohio State produced the most first round selections (five), while Southern California produced the most overall selections (eleven). Twenty-seven compensatory and supplemental compensatory selections were distributed amongst seventeen teams; Tampa Bay, Baltimore, and Tennessee each held three compensatory picks. The league also held a supplemental draft after the regular draft and before the regular season. The 255 players chosen in the draft were composed of:

After not performing much at the NFL Scouting Combine, on March 16, 2006, just 8 months after surgery to repair his torn ACL, Cromartie performed at his pro day in 2006 for scouts. [11] [12]

San Diego Chargers

Cromartie with the Chargers in 2007 Antonio Cromartie.jpg
Cromartie with the Chargers in 2007

On July 25, 2006, Cromartie signed a 5-year, $13.5 million contract with $7.35 million guaranteed with the Chargers. In his first season with the Chargers, Cromartie saw action at cornerback and on special teams. Toward the end of the season, Cromartie handled some punt and kickoff return duties. In a game against the Oakland Raiders, Cromartie returned a kickoff 91 yards, the longest return for the team since 2001.

Cromartie wore jersey No. 25 his rookie season but switched to No. 31 as a Charger for subsequent years, the reverse of #13, the jersey he wore at Florida State.

On October 28, 2007, Cromartie had two interceptions, returning one 70 yards for a touchdown, and a fumble recovery for another touchdown while leading the Chargers to a 35–10 victory against the Houston Texans. He was subsequently nominated for the AFC Defensive Player of the Week award.

The following week, Cromartie made NFL history. Minnesota Vikings kicker Ryan Longwell came onto the field to attempt a 58-yard field goal to end the first half. The Chargers put Cromartie in the endzone to return the field goal in case of a missed kick. The field goal attempt missed the goalposts and fell toward the back of the endzone. Cromartie intercepted the football, came down with both feet in bounds, two inches from the back of the end zone, and began the return. Cromartie returned the missed field goal 109 yards for a touchdown at The Metrodome, setting a record for the longest play in NFL history. This record can be equaled but never exceeded (barring a rule change); a regulation football field is 100 yards long, the end zones are 10 yards deep, a play ends when the ball crosses the goal line, and all plays are rounded down to the nearest yard. Therefore, according to the current rules of the game, 109 is the theoretical maximum for plays in the NFL.

The next week Cromartie made his first NFL start in place of the injured Quentin Jammer and intercepted three passes thrown by Peyton Manning of the Indianapolis Colts; the last of which was a leaping one-handed interception in front of Colts WR Reggie Wayne. [13] Cromartie called the interception the best play of his short career. [14] He is the first player to intercept Peyton Manning three times in one game during the regular season, and earned Defensive Player of the Week honors for his performance in the game. [15]

On November 24, Cromartie became the starting cornerback, replacing Drayton Florence (who became a free agent at the end of the season). In the AFC Divisional game against the Colts, Cromartie recorded another interception against Peyton Manning, and his defensive efforts during the game (including a forced fumble against Marvin Harrison) helped the Chargers knock off the defending champion Colts.

On December 16, Cromartie set a franchise record by recording his 10th interception of the season, breaking the previous record of 9 interceptions set by Charlie McNeil in 1961. His 10 interceptions led the NFL for number of interceptions in 2007. In addition, Cromartie had 2 post season interceptions.

Cromartie was one of three cornerbacks selected to the 2007 AFC Pro Bowl team, his first selection. At the Pro Bowl, Cromartie intercepted two passes.

Cromartie was not as successful in 2008, his third season. After stating before the season began that he'd like to break the all-time interception record in a season (14), he managed only 2 interceptions for the season. At the end of the season, Cromartie announced that he played the entire season with a broken hip. The injury was sustained in the first week of the season against the Carolina Panthers.

He finished the 2009 regular season with 3 interceptions, 33 tackles, and 10 passes defended.

New York Jets

Cromartie was traded to the New York Jets on March 4, 2010 for a third-round draft pick in the 2011 NFL Draft that turned into a second-round pick based on Cromartie's performance. [16] In his first regular season game with the Jets, Cromartie intercepted an errant throw from Joe Flacco which he returned 66 yards. [17] Cromartie performed well, but he was inconsistent throughout the season. He finished the regular season with 3 interceptions and broke up 18 passes, but he gave up 7 touchdowns. [18] His kickoff return in the wild card round against the Indianapolis Colts helped to set up Nick Folk's game-winning field goal. [19]

The Jets re-signed Cromartie to a four-year, $32 million contract on August 1, 2011. [18] In the home opener against the Dallas Cowboys on September 11, Cromartie gave up two touchdowns to Dez Bryant and Miles Austin but rebounded the following week intercepting two passes by Luke McCown. [20] Cromartie was named the AFC Defensive Player of the Week for his performance against the Jaguars. [21] In Week 3 against the Oakland Raiders, Cromartie committed four errant penalties for 46 total yards. He later fumbled a kickoff return which resulted in a turnover that led to a Raiders go-ahead touchdown. He left the game in the second half and was transported to Eden Medical Center where he was diagnosed with bruised ribs and a pulmonary contusion. [22]

During the 2012 season, after Darrelle Revis went down due to a torn ACL, Cromartie became the #1 cornerback and performed well, finishing the year with 3 interceptions, 13 passes defended, and 30 tackles in all 16 games started. For his efforts, Cromartie was elected to attend the Pro Bowl for the 2nd time of his career.

After the 2013 season, Cromartie was elected to attend the Pro Bowl as a replacement. It was the third election of his career. Cromartie was released by the Jets on March 9, 2014. [23]

Arizona Cardinals

Cromartie signed a one-year, $3.25 million contract with the Arizona Cardinals on March 19, 2014. [24] He made the Pro Bowl that year as well

Second stint with the Jets

On March 12, 2015, Cromartie signed a four-year, $32 million deal to return to the Jets. [25] On February 22, 2016, the Jets released Cromartie after just one season. [26]

Indianapolis Colts

On August 22, 2016, Cromartie signed a one-year contract with the Indianapolis Colts. [27] On October 4, 2016, after just four games with the team, Cromartie was released. [28]

Retirement

On March 5, 2018, after spending the entire 2017 season out of football, Cromartie officially announced his retirement from football. [29] [30]

NFL statistics

TeamsGamesTacklesFumblesInterceptions
YearTeamGPGSCOMBTOTALASTSACKFFFRFR YDSINTIR YDSAVG IRLNGTDPD
2006 SD 160242040.0000000004
2007 SD 168443950.0020101441470118
2008 SD 1615646040.0000266335219
2009 SD 1616333120.0000317616010
2010 NYJ 1515424110.00103752566017
2011 NYJ 1616453690.010041052642012
2012 NYJ 1616353050.00003531840113
2013 NYJ 1616383530.010032072009
2014 ARI 1616484350.001143652240010
2015 NYJ 1515292630.00000000012
2016 IND 44141400.0000000002
Career162137417376410.024143154518703116

Personal life

He is the cousin of Dominique Rodgers-Cromartie who played cornerback for the New York Giants, and Marcus Cromartie.

Cromartie married Terricka Cason, who starred on E!'s Candy Girls , on July 2, 2010. [31] Cason gave birth to a daughter in April 2010 [31] a son in early 2012, [32] twins in 2016, and in August 2017 a daughter. [33] Cromartie has 14 children in total with many different women. [34] [35] [36]

In 2016, he knelt in protest of police brutality and racial oppression during the playing of the national anthem. He was released from the Colts in October. Terricka Cromartie believed that his release was due to his action. [37]

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