Army Black Knights men's basketball

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Army Black Knights
Basketball current event.svg 2021–22 Army Black Knights men's basketball team
Army West Point logo.svg
University United States Military Academy
Head coach Jimmy Allen (5th season)
Conference Patriot
Location West Point, New York
Arena Christl Arena
(Capacity: 5,043)
Nickname Black Knights
ColorsBlack, gold, and gray [1]
     
Uniforms
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Home
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Away


Pre-tournament Premo-Porretta Champions
1923

The Army Black Knights men's basketball team represents the United States Military Academy in National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I college basketball. Army currently competes as a member of the Patriot League and plays its home games at Christl Arena in West Point, New York.

Contents

Bob Knight, the one-time most successful men's basketball coach in NCAA history, began his head coaching career at Army from 1965 to 1971 before moving on to Indiana. One of Knight's players at Army was Mike Krzyzewski, who later was head coach at Army before moving on to Duke and becoming the winningest men's basketball coach in NCAA Division I history.

Army has generally not done well on the court since its inception in 1903. The Black Knights are one of only four original Division I teams in history to have never participated in the NCAA Division I Men's Basketball Tournament and one of 35 elgibile teams. [2] [3] Army shares this dubious distinction with William & Mary, The Citadel, and St. Francis Brooklyn. However, the Black Knights have played in the National Invitational Tournament eight times, [4] and were retroactively named national champions by Premo-Porretta for 1923 and by the Helms Athletic Foundation for 1944, [5] when they went undefeated (15–0), [6] but declined an invitation to the NCAA Tournament due to World War II. The Black Knights played in the 2016 edition of the CollegeInsider.com Postseason Tournament (CIT), their first appearance in a postseason tournament in 38 years, losing to NJIT in the first round. The Black Knights did in fact receive an NCAA Tournament invite in 1968, but head coach Bob Knight refused the bid, claiming they had a better chance to win the NIT. They would go on to lose their first game of the NIT to Notre Dame. [7]

Seasons

In 119 seasons, the Black Knights have a record of 1262–1276. [6]

Postseason results

National Invitation Tournament

The Black Knights have appeared in the National Invitation Tournament (NIT) eight times. Their combined record is 13–10.

YearRoundOpponentResult
1961 First RoundTempleL 66–79
1964 First Round
Quarterfinals
Semifinals
3rd Place Game
St. Bonaventure
Duquesne
Bradley
NYU
W 64–62
W 67–65
L 52–67
W 60–59
1965 First Round
Quarterfinals
Semifinals
3rd Place Game
St. Louis
Western Kentucky
St. John's
NYU
W 70–66
W 58–54
L 60–67
W 75–74
1966 First Round
Quarterfinals
Semifinals
3rd Place Game
Manhattan
San Francisco
BYU
Villanova
W 71–66
W 80–63
L 60–66
L 65–76
1968 First RoundNotre DameL 58–62
1969 First Round
Quarterfinals
Semifinals
3rd Place Game
Wyoming
South Carolina
Boston College
Tennessee
W 51–49
W 59–45
L 61–73
L 52–64
1970 First Round
Quarterfinals
Semifinals
3rd Place Game
Cincinnati
Manhattan
St. John's
LSU
W 72–67
W 77–72
L 59–60
W 75–68
1978 First RoundRutgersL 70–72

CollegeInsider.com Tournament

The Black Knights have appeared in one CollegeInsider.com Postseason Tournament (CIT). Their record is 0–1.

YearRoundOpponentResult
2016 First RoundNJITL 65–79

CBI results

The Black Knights have appeared in one College Basketball Invitational (CBI). Their record is 0–1.

YearRoundOpponentResult
2021 First RoundBellarmineL 67–77

Head coaches

CoachYearsRecord
Joseph Stilwell 1902–04
1908–11
1913–14
41–14
No coach1904–0610–8
Harry Fisher 1906–079–5
B.H. Koehler1907–089–3
Harvey Higley 1911–1319–6
Jacob Devers 1914–1616–9
Arthur Conrad1916–173–8
Ivens Jones1917–1911–9
Joseph O'Shea1919–2130–7
Harry Fisher1921–23
1924–25
46–5
Van Vleit1923–2416–2
Ernest Blood 1925–2611–6
Leo Novak1926–39126–56
Valentine Lentz1939–4331–31
Edward Kelleher 1943–4529–1
Stewart Holcomb1945–4718–13
John Mauer 1947–5133–35
Elmer Ripley 1951–5319–17
Bob Vanatta 1953–5415–7
Orvis Sigler 1954–5839–47
George Hunter1958–6363–48
Tates Locke 1963–6540–15
Bob Knight 1965–71102–50
Dan Dougherty1971–7531–66
Mike Krzyzewski 1975–8073–59
Pete Gaudet 1980–8212–41
Les Wothke 1982–9092–135
Tom Miller 1990–9210–46
Mike Conners1992–934–22
Dino Gaudio 1993–9736–72
Pat Harris1997–200242–96
Jim Crews 2002–0959–140
Zach Spiker 2009–16102–112
Jimmy Allen 2016–present81–96

[8]

All-Americans

The following Army players were named NCAA Men's Basketball All-Americans:

Academic All-Americans

The following Army players were named Academic All-America:

Basketball Hall of Fame

The following Army players and coaches have been inducted into the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame:

Major awards

Eastern Collegiate Athletic Conference Award: Outstanding Scholar-Athlete of the Year

Frances Pomeroy Naismith Award

Haggerty Award

Metro Atlantic Athletic Conference Men's Basketball Player of the Year

Metro Atlantic Athletic Conference Men's Basketball Coach of the Year

Patriot League Men's Basketball Coach of the Year

Patriot League Men's Basketball Rookie of the Year

Patriot League Men's Basketball Defensive Player of the Year

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References

  1. Army Brand Guidelines (PDF). April 13, 2015. Retrieved June 28, 2020.
  2. "Kryzyzewski, Knight coached at Army. It still lacks an NCAA tournament appearance. - The Washington Post".
  3. "Wall Street Journal blog: March Madness Claims New Victims".. Accessed March 18, 2008.
  4. "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2010-05-27. Retrieved 2011-05-22.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  5. ESPN, ed. (2009). ESPN College Basketball Encyclopedia: The Complete History of the Men's Game. New York, NY: ESPN Books. p. 536. ISBN   978-0-345-51392-2.
  6. 1 2 "Army Black Knights School History". sports-reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved March 8, 2022.
  7. Chris Chase. "The odd reason Army has never made the NCAA tournament". ftw.usatoday.com. Retrieved March 17, 2021.
  8. "Army Black Knights Index". College Basketball at Sports-Reference.com.