Trophy Point

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Trophy Point

View from Trophy Point, West Point NY, at dawn in the summertime.jpg

Location United States Military Academy, West Point, NY
Nearest city Highland Falls, NY
Coordinates 41°23′41″N73°57′25″W / 41.39472°N 73.95694°W / 41.39472; -73.95694 Coordinates: 41°23′41″N73°57′25″W / 41.39472°N 73.95694°W / 41.39472; -73.95694
Established 1802
Managed by US Army

Trophy Point is a scenic overlook of the Hudson River Valley located at West Point, New York. It has been the subject of numerous works of art since the early 19th century. Trophy Point is the location of Battle Monument, one of the largest columns of granite in the world. Designed by architect Stanford White and dedicated in 1897, [1] Trophy Point was formerly the site of West Point graduation ceremonies before the class sizes became larger in the mid-twentieth century.

Hudson River river in New York State, draining into the Atlantic at New York City

The Hudson River is a 315-mile (507 km) river that flows from north to south primarily through eastern New York in the United States. The river originates in the Adirondack Mountains of Upstate New York, flows southward through the Hudson Valley to the Upper New York Bay between New York City and Jersey City. It eventually drains into the Atlantic Ocean at New York Harbor. The river serves as a political boundary between the states of New Jersey and New York at its southern end. Further north, it marks local boundaries between several New York counties. The lower half of the river is a tidal estuary, deeper than the body of water into which it flows, occupying the Hudson Fjord, an inlet which formed during the most recent period of North American glaciation, estimated at 26,000 to 13,300 years ago. Tidal waters influence the Hudson's flow from as far north as the city of Troy.

West Point, New York CDP in New York, United States

West Point is the oldest continuously occupied military post in the United States. Located on the Hudson River in New York, West Point was identified by General George Washington as the most important strategic position in America during the American Revolution. Until January 1778, West Point was not occupied by the military. On January 27, 1778, Brigadier General Samuel Holden Parsons and his brigade crossed the ice on the Hudson River and climbed to the plain on West Point to intercept Lt. Major Roldan Kramer and from that day to the present, West Point has been occupied by the United States Army. It comprises approximately 16,000 acres (6,500 ha) including the campus of the United States Military Academy, which is commonly called "West Point".

Stanford White architect

Stanford White was an American architect. He was also a partner in the architectural firm McKim, Mead & White, the frontrunner among Beaux-Arts firms. He designed many houses for the rich as well as numerous public, institutional, and religious buildings. His design principles embodied the "American Renaissance".

Trophy Point gets its name from the numerous displayed pieces of captured artillery spanning from the Revolutionary War to the Spanish–American War.

Cannon Class of artillery which fires at a low or flat trajectory

A cannon is a type of gun classified as artillery that launches a projectile using propellant. In the past, gunpowder was the primary propellant before the invention of smokeless powder in the 19th century. Cannon vary in caliber, range, mobility, rate of fire, angle of fire, and firepower; different forms of cannon combine and balance these attributes in varying degrees, depending on their intended use on the battlefield. The word cannon is derived from several languages, in which the original definition can usually be translated as tube, cane, or reed. In the modern era, the term cannon has fallen into decline, replaced by guns or artillery if not a more specific term such as mortar or howitzer, except for high calibre automatic weapons firing bigger rounds than machine guns, called autocannons.

American Revolution Colonial revolt in which the Thirteen Colonies won independence from Great Britain

The American Revolution was a colonial revolt that took place between 1765 and 1783. The American Patriots in the Thirteen Colonies won independence from Great Britain, becoming the United States of America. They defeated the British in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783) in alliance with France and others.

Spanish–American War Conflict in 1898 between Spain and the United States

The Spanish–American War was fought between the United States and Spain in 1898. Hostilities began in the aftermath of the internal explosion of USS Maine in Havana harbor in Cuba, leading to U.S. intervention in the Cuban War of Independence. U.S. acquisition of Spain's Pacific possessions led to its involvement in the Philippine Revolution and ultimately in the Philippine–American War.

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West Point Cemetery cemetery on the grounds of the military academy in West Point, New York, United States

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Tropaion

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Battle Monument (West Point)

Battle Monument is a large Tuscan column monument located on Trophy Point at the United States Military Academy, West Point, NY. Designed by Stanford White, it was dedicated on 30 May 1897 by surviving American Civil War veterans. The monument was financed by monthly contributions from the pay of the officers and soldiers of the regular army. The granite column, standing 46 feet tall and 5 feet in diameter, is reputed to be the largest column of polished granite in the Western Hemisphere. Inscribed on bronze straps belting the eight monumental "cannon balls" circling the column are the names of 2,230 Regular Army officers and soldiers who died for the Union during the Civil War. Designed by Frederick MacMonnies, a female statue sits atop the monument, representing "fame". The statue that now tops the monument is actually the second version of the statue. Just months after it was unveiled, MacMonnies agreed to replace the original statue after complaints that it was too large and awkward. Traditionally, the plebes at West Point made reference to the statue of Fame when giving the following reply to any upperclassman demanding to know "How are they all?": "They are all fickle but one, sir." "Who is the one?" "She who stands atop Battle Monument, for she has been on the same shaft since 1897;" however, this is no longer current practice.

The Plain (West Point)

The Plain is the parade field at the United States Military Academy at West Point, New York. The flat terrain of the Plain is in contrast to the varied and hilly terrain of the remainder of the campus. The Plain rises approximately 150 feet (45 m) above the Hudson River and has been the site of the longest continually occupied U.S. Army garrison in America since 1778. In its early years, the entire academy was located on the Plain and it was used for varying activities ranging from drill and mounted cavalry maneuvers to an encampment site for summer training to a sports venue. Currently, the Plain refers to just the parade field where cadets perform ceremonial parades.

Sedgwick Monument (West Point)

Sedgwick Monument is a memorial to Union General John Sedgwick at West Point. "Uncle John" Sedgwick was born in Cornwall, Connecticut, 67 miles northeast of West Point, New York. Sculpted by Launt Thompson and dedicated in 1868, the monument was erected by officers and soldiers of the 6th Army Corps to commemorate Major General Sedgwick and his death at the Battle of Spotsylvania Court House in 1864. Originally, the monument was located on the northwest edge of the Plain, it was later relocated to its current location at Trophy Point across Washington Road from Battle Monument. Legend holds that if a cadet is deficient in academics, the cadet should go to the monument at midnight the night before the term-end examination, in full dress, under arms, and spin the rowels on the monument’s spurs. With the resulting good luck, the cadet will pass the test.

Woods Monument (West Point)

Wood's Monument is an obelisk monument in honor of Colonel Eleazer Derby Wood (1783–1814), an engineer officer and early graduate of West Point who died during the War of 1812 at the Siege of Fort Erie on 17 September 1814. Old prints of West Point show this monument located on a knoll near the flag pole. The monument was once used as a navigational aid for ships making the passage down the Hudson River.

HMAS Sydney I - SMS Emden Memorial war memorial in Hyde Park, Sydney, Australia

HMAS Sydney I - SMS Emden Memorial is a heritage-listed former foreign naval ship gun and now war memorial and war trophy located in Hyde Park, on the corner of Liverpool and College Streets in the Sydney central business district, in the City of Sydney local government area of New South Wales, Australia. It was designed by City of Sydney and built from 1917 by Messrs Loveridge and Hudson, Redfern. It is also known as HMAS Sydney 1 - SMS Emden Memorial and Emden Gun. The property is owned by City of Sydney. It was added to the New South Wales State Heritage Register on 27 February 2015.

References

  1. Crackel, Theodore (1991) Illustrated History of West Point. New York: Harry N. Abrams, Inc. ISBN   0-8109-3458-2