Athletics at the 1992 Summer Olympics – Men's 100 metres

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Men's 100 metres
at the Games of the XXV Olympiad
Venue Olympic Stadium
DateJuly 31 (heats)
August 1 (final)
Competitors81 from 66 nations
Winning time9.96
Medalists
Gold medal icon.svg Linford Christie
Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain
Silver medal icon.svg Frankie Fredericks
Flag of Namibia.svg  Namibia
Bronze medal icon.svg Dennis Mitchell
Flag of the United States.svg  United States
  1988
1996  
Official Video TV-icon-2.svg
Official Video

The men's 100 metres was an event at the 1992 Summer Olympics in Barcelona, Spain. There were a total number of 81 participating athletes from 66 nations, with ten qualifying heats (three qualified plus two fastest losers). [1] [2] Each nation was limited to 3 athletes per rules in force since the 1930 Olympic Congress.

Contents

The gold medal was won by Great Britain's Linford Christie, who had originally won the bronze medal in 1988 but was elevated to silver following the disqualification of original gold medalist Ben Johnson for using stanozolol. Silver went to Namibia's Frankie Fredericks, who also finished second in the 200 metres in Barcelona, while Dennis Mitchell of the United States of America won the bronze. Namibia had never competed in the men's 100 metres before, so Fredericks's medal was that nation's first in the event; it was also the first medal by an African country in the event since 1908 (when Reggie Walker of South Africa won gold).

Background

This was the twenty-second time the event was held, having appeared at every Olympics since the first in 1896. The gold and bronze medalists from 1988, Americans Carl Lewis (the two-time defending gold medalist as well as three-time reigning world champion, struck by infection at the U.S. trials) and Calvin Smith, did not return, but British silver medalist Linford Christie (reigning Commonwealth and European champion) did. So did fourth-place finisher American Dennis Mitchell (who had taken bronze at the 1991 world championships), Brazilian fifth-place finisher Robson da Silva, Jamaican seventh-place finisher Ray Stewart, and the disqualified original champion, Canadian Ben Johnson. World championship runner-up American Leroy Burrell was also present in 1992. [2]

The Cayman Islands, the Central African Republic, the Cook Islands, Cyprus, Gabon, Grenada, Honduras, Mauritania, Namibia, and Niger appeared in the event for the first time. It was also the only appearance of the Unified Team, following the breakup of the Soviet Union. Romania appeared independently for the first time since 1928. The United States made its 21st appearance in the event, most of any country, having missed only the boycotted 1980 Games.

Competition format

The event retained the same basic four round format introduced in 1920: heats, quarterfinals, semifinals, and a final. The "fastest loser" system, introduced in 1968, was used again to ensure that the quarterfinals and subsequent rounds had exactly 8 runners per heat; this time, the system was used in only the preliminaries.

The first round consisted of 10 heats, each with 8 athletes except the last (with 9). The top three runners in each heat advanced, along with the next two fastest runners overall. This made 32 quarterfinalists, who were divided into 4 heats of 8 runners. The top four runners in each quarterfinal advanced, with no "fastest loser" places. The 16 semifinalists competed in two heats of 8, with the top four in each semifinal advancing to the eight-man final. [2] [3]

Records

These were the standing world and Olympic records (in seconds) prior to the 1992 Summer Olympics.

World Record9.86 Flag of the United States.svg Carl Lewis Tokyo (JPN)August 25, 1991
Olympic Record9.92 Flag of the United States.svg Carl Lewis Seoul (KOR)September 24, 1988

Results

Heats

Heat 1

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Leroy Burrell Flag of the United States.svg  United States 10.21Q
2 Satoru Inoue Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg  Japan 10.48Q
3 Jean-Olivier Zirignon Flag of Cote d'Ivoire.svg  Ivory Coast 10.55Q
4 Abdulieh Janneh Flag of The Gambia.svg  The Gambia 10.71
5 Hassane Illiassou Flag of Niger.svg  Niger 10.73
6 Khalid Juma Juma Flag of Bahrain (1972-2002).svg  Bahrain 10.80
7 Jaime Zelaya Flag of Honduras.svg  Honduras 11.02
8 Claude Roumain Flag of Haiti.svg  Haiti 11.07

Heat 2

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Dennis Mitchell Flag of the United States.svg  United States 10.21Q
2 Vitaliy Savin Olympic flag.svg  Unified Team 10.29Q
3 Samuel Nchinda Flag of Cameroon.svg  Cameroon 10.41Q
4 Gustavo Envela Mahua Flag of Equatorial Guinea.svg  Equatorial Guinea 10.65
5 Florencio Aguilar Flag of Panama.svg  Panama 10.73
6 Dominique Canti Flag of San Marino (before 2011).svg  San Marino 10.80
Charles Tayot Flag of Gabon.svg  Gabon DNF
Andreas Berger Flag of Austria.svg  Austria DSQ

Heat 3

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Linford Christie Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain 10.48Q
2 Arnaldo da Silva Flag of Brazil (1968-1992).svg  Brazil 10.55Q
3 Daniel Sangouma Flag of France.svg  France 10.63Q
4 Ato Boldon Flag of Trinidad and Tobago.svg  Trinidad and Tobago 10.77
5 Hussain Arif Flag of Pakistan.svg  Pakistan 10.83
6 Fabian Muyaba Flag of Zimbabwe.svg  Zimbabwe 10.84
7 Pascal Dangbo Flag of Benin.svg  Benin 11.03
8 Henry Daley Colphon Flag of Costa Rica.svg  Costa Rica 11.11

Heat 4

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Frankie Fredericks Flag of Namibia.svg  Namibia 10.29Q
2 Marcus Adam Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain 10.57Q
3 Atlee Mahorn Flag of Canada.svg  Canada 10.64Q
4 Boevi Lawson Flag of Togo.svg  Togo 10.69
5 Sriyantha Dissanayake Flag of Sri Lanka.svg  Sri Lanka 10.87
6 Gabriel Simeon Flag of Grenada.svg  Grenada 11.10
7 Adam Hassan Sakak Flag of Sudan.svg  Sudan 11.12
8 Robinson Stewart Flag of Swaziland.svg  Swaziland 11.20

Heat 5

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Ray Stewart Flag of Jamaica.svg  Jamaica 10.61Q
2 Patrick Stevens Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Belgium 10.63Q
3 John Myles-Mills Flag of Ghana.svg  Ghana 10.64Q
4 Neville Hodge Flag of the United States Virgin Islands.svg  Virgin Islands 10.71
5 Henrico Atkins Flag of Barbados.svg  Barbados 10.83
6 Golam Ambia Flag of Bangladesh.svg  Bangladesh 11.06
7 Gabrieli Qoro Flag of Fiji.svg  Fiji 11.14
8 Mark Sherwin Flag of the Cook Islands.svg  Cook Islands 11.53

Heat 6

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Davidson Ezinwa Flag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria 10.31Q
2 Ben Johnson Flag of Canada.svg  Canada 10.55Q
3 Eric Akogyiram Flag of Ghana.svg  Ghana 10.60Q
4 Juan Trapero Flag of Spain.svg  Spain 10.64
5 Joel Otim Flag of Uganda.svg  Uganda 10.84
6 Soryba Diakité Flag of Guinea.svg  Guinea 11.10
7 Ould Nouroudine Flag of Mauritania (1959-2017).svg  Mauritania 11.22
8 Ahmed Shageef Flag of Maldives.svg  Maldives 11.36

Heat 7

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Olapade Adeniken Flag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria 10.36Q
2 Talal Mansour Al-Rahim Flag of Qatar.svg  Qatar 10.43Q
3 Stefan Burkart Flag of Switzerland.svg  Switzerland 10.67Q
4 Visut Watanasin Flag of Thailand.svg  Thailand 10.72
5 André da Silva Flag of Brazil (1968-1992).svg  Brazil 10.78
6 Valentin Ngbogo Flag of the Central African Republic.svg  Central African Republic 10.79
7 Bernard Manana Flag of Papua New Guinea.svg  Papua New Guinea 11.35
8 Sitthixay Sacpraseuth Flag of Laos.svg  Laos 12.02

Heat 8

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Chidi Imoh Flag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria 10.47Q
2 Daniel Cojocaru Flag of Romania.svg  Romania 10.57Q
3 Sanusi Turay Flag of Sierra Leone.svg  Sierra Leone 10.58Q
4 Kennedy Ondieki Flag of Kenya.svg  Kenya 10.60
5 Kareem Streete-Thompson Flag of the Cayman Islands (pre-1999).svg  Cayman Islands 10.78
6 David Nkoua Flag of the Republic of the Congo.svg  Republic of the Congo 10.96
7 Emery Gill Flag of Belize.svg  Belize 11.51
8 Ahmed Al-Moamari Bashir Flag of Oman (1970-1995).svg  Oman 11.58

Heat 9

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Max Morinière Flag of France.svg  France 10.36Q
2 Bruny Surin Flag of Canada.svg  Canada 10.37Q
3 Emmanuel Tuffour Flag of Ghana.svg  Ghana 10.45Q
4 Tatsuo Sugimoto Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg  Japan 10.56
5 Ku Wai Ming Flag of Hong Kong (1959-1997).svg  Hong Kong 10.74
6 Toluta'u Koula Flag of Tonga.svg  Tonga 10.85
7 Afonso Ferraz Flag of Angola.svg  Angola 11.32
8 Fletcher Wamilee Flag of Vanuatu.svg  Vanuatu 11.41

Heat 10

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Robson da Silva Flag of Brazil (1968-1992).svg  Brazil 10.24Q
2 Mark Witherspoon Flag of the United States.svg  United States 10.27Q
3 Pavel Galkin Olympic flag.svg  Unified Team 10.43Q
4 Yiannis Zisimides Flag of Cyprus (1960-2006).svg  Cyprus 10.51q
5 Shinji Aoto Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg  Japan 10.54q
6 Charles Louis Seck Flag of Senegal.svg  Senegal 10.57
7 Ousmane Diarra Flag of Mali.svg  Mali 10.87
8 Bothloko Shebe Flag of Lesotho (1987-2006).svg  Lesotho 10.94
Patrice Traoré Zeba Flag of Burkina Faso.svg  Burkina Faso DNF

Quarterfinals

Quarterfinal 1

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Mark Witherspoon Flag of the United States.svg  United States 10.19Q
2 Robson da Silva Flag of Brazil (1968-1992).svg  Brazil 10.29Q
3 Talal Mansour Al-Rahim Flag of Qatar.svg  Qatar 10.32Q
4 Max Morinière Flag of France.svg  France 10.34Q
5 Marcus Adam Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain 10.35
6 Pavel Galkin Olympic flag.svg  Unified Team 10.37
7 Eric Akogyiram Flag of Ghana.svg  Ghana 10.68
8 Atlee Mahorn Flag of Canada.svg  Canada 10.77

Quarterfinal 2

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Frankie Fredericks Flag of Namibia.svg  Namibia 10.13Q
2 Bruny Surin Flag of Canada.svg  Canada 10.24Q
3 Vitaliy Savin Olympic flag.svg  Unified Team 10.33Q
4 Davidson Ezinwa Flag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria 10.38Q
5 John Myles-Mills Flag of Ghana.svg  Ghana 10.41
6 Stefan Burkart Flag of Switzerland.svg  Switzerland 10.57
7 Samuel Nchinda Flag of Cameroon.svg  Cameroon 10.58
8 Patrick Stevens Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Belgium 10.69

Quarterfinal 3

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Dennis Mitchell Flag of the United States.svg  United States 10.22Q
2 Olapade Adeniken Flag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria 10.22Q
3 Emmanuel Tuffour Flag of Ghana.svg  Ghana 10.31Q
4 Ray Stewart Flag of Jamaica.svg  Jamaica 10.36Q
5 Satoru Inoue Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg  Japan 10.50
6 Daniel Cojocaru Flag of Romania.svg  Romania 10.57
7 Daniel Sangouma Flag of France.svg  France 10.64
8 Yiannis Zisimides Flag of Cyprus (1960-2006).svg  Cyprus 10.65

Quarterfinal 4

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Linford Christie Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain 10.07Q
2 Leroy Burrell Flag of the United States.svg  United States 10.08Q
3 Chidi Imoh Flag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria 10.21Q
4 Ben Johnson Flag of Canada.svg  Canada 10.30Q
5 Sanusi Turay Flag of Sierra Leone.svg  Sierra Leone 10.40
6 Arnaldo da Silva Flag of Brazil (1968-1992).svg  Brazil 10.47
7 Shinji Aoto Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg  Japan 10.53
8 Jean-Olivier Zirignon Flag of Cote d'Ivoire.svg  Ivory Coast 10.54

Semifinals

Semifinal 1

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Leroy Burrell Flag of the United States.svg  United States 9.97Q
2 Linford Christie Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain 10.00Q
3 Dennis Mitchell Flag of the United States.svg  United States 10.10Q
4 Davidson Ezinwa Flag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria 10.23Q
5 Chidi Imoh Flag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria 10.30
6 Robson da Silva Flag of Brazil (1968-1992).svg  Brazil 10.32
7 Vitaliy Savin Olympic flag.svg  Unified Team 10.33
8 Ben Johnson Flag of Canada.svg  Canada 10.70

Semifinal 2

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Frankie Fredericks Flag of Namibia.svg  Namibia 10.17Q
2 Bruny Surin Flag of Canada.svg  Canada 10.21Q
3 Olapade Adeniken Flag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria 10.28Q
4 Ray Stewart Flag of Jamaica.svg  Jamaica 10.33Q
5 Talal Mansour Al-Rahim Flag of Qatar.svg  Qatar 10.34
6 Emmanuel Tuffour Flag of Ghana.svg  Ghana 10.34
7 Max Morinière Flag of France.svg  France 10.42
Mark Witherspoon Flag of the United States.svg  United States DNF

Final

The final was held on August 1, 1992.

RankAthleteNationTime
Gold medal icon.svg Linford Christie Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain 9.96
Silver medal icon.svg Frankie Fredericks Flag of Namibia.svg  Namibia 10.02
Bronze medal icon.svg Dennis Mitchell Flag of the United States.svg  United States 10.04
4 Bruny Surin Flag of Canada.svg  Canada 10.09
5 Leroy Burrell Flag of the United States.svg  United States 10.10
6 Olapade Adeniken Flag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria 10.12
7 Ray Stewart Flag of Jamaica.svg  Jamaica 10.22
8 Davidson Ezinwa Flag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria 10.26

See also

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References

  1. "Athletics at the 1992 Barcelona Summer Games: Men's 100 metres". Sports Reference. Archived from the original on 17 April 2020. Retrieved 7 July 2017.
  2. 1 2 3 "100 metres, Men". Olympedia. Retrieved 24 July 2020.
  3. Official Report, vol. 5, pp. 36–37.