Athletics at the 1996 Summer Olympics – Men's 100 metres

Last updated
Men's 100 metres
at the Games of the XXVI Olympiad
Venue Centennial Olympic Stadium
DateJuly 26–27
Competitors106 from 75 nations
Winning time9.84 WR
Medalists
Gold medal icon.svg Donovan Bailey
Flag of Canada.svg  Canada
Silver medal icon.svg Frank Fredericks
Flag of Namibia.svg  Namibia
Bronze medal icon.svg Ato Boldon
Flag of Trinidad and Tobago.svg  Trinidad and Tobago
  1992
2000  
Official Video Highlights @ 1:04:34 TV-icon-2.svg
Official Video Highlights @ 1:04:34

These are the official results of the men's 100 metres event at the 1996 Summer Olympics in Atlanta. There were a total number of 106 participating athletes from 75 nations, with twelve heats in round 1, five quarterfinals, two semifinals and a final. [1] Each nation was limited to 3 athletes per rules in force since the 1930 Olympic Congress. The event was won by Donovan Bailey of Canada, the nation's first title in the event since Percy Williams won it in 1928.

Contents

Summary

Canada's Donovan Bailey won the gold medal, breaking the world record that Leroy Burrell of the United States had set in 1994. Namibia's Frankie Fredericks won the silver medal for a second consecutive Olympics, while Trinidad and Tobago sprinter Ato Boldon won the bronze. It was Trinidad and Tobago's first medal in the event since 1976. For Fredericks and Boldon, this was the first of two events where they both medaled behind a world record setting run; Fredericks took silver and Boldon bronze in the 200 metre event where Michael Johnson ran 19.32 to win.

At first Bailey who was going to be the eventual winner did not get a great start. Mitchell and Boldon got terrific starts. Boldon led the race till the 60 metre mark, the point where Canadian Donovan Bailey was gaining on the field. He had an unbelievable surge with a top end speed of over 12 m/s, world record at that time. He won the race with a new 100 metres men's world record time of 9.84 which was 100th of a second faster than the previous record. Fredericks of Namibia edged past Boldon of Trinidad to take silver. While Linford Christie the defending Olympic Champion was watching the entire event unfold from the point of view of a spectator, having been disqualified after two false starts, the second of which was controversial. [2]

This marked the first time since 1976 (and the boycotted 1980 Games) that no American runner medaled in the 100 metres, with 1992 bronze medalist Dennis Mitchell placing fourth behind Boldon. Counting 1980, it was only the fourth time that the United States missed the podium.

Background

This was the twenty-third time the event was held, having appeared at every Olympics since the first in 1896. For the first time, all three medalists from the previous Games (Great Britain's Linford Christie, Namibia's Frankie Fredericks, and the United States's Dennis Mitchell) returned. Indeed, seven of the eight finalists from 1992 were back in 1996—the other returners were Canadian Bruny Surin, Nigerians Olapade Adeniken and Davidson Ezinwa, and Jamaican Raymond Stewart; only Leroy Burrell did not return to the 100 metres in 1996. Donovan Bailey of Canada had won the 1995 world championships, followed by countryman Surin and then Trinidad and Tobago's Ato Boldon. Christie was the reigning Commonwealth and European champion, and had won the 1993 world championship. [1]

Azerbaijan, Comoros, Guinea-Bissau, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Libya, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, São Tomé and Príncipe, Ukraine, and Uzbekistan appeared in the event for the first time. Russia appeared independently for the first time since 1912 and Latvia did so for the first time since 1924. The United States made its 22nd appearance in the event, most of any country, having missed only the boycotted 1980 Games.

Competition format

The event retained the same basic four round format introduced in 1920: heats, quarterfinals, semifinals, and a final. The "fastest loser" system, introduced in 1968, was used again to ensure that the quarterfinals and subsequent rounds had exactly 8 runners per heat; this time, the system was used in both the heats and quarterfinals.

The first round consisted of 12 heats, each with 9 athletes scheduled (2 heats had 8 actually run due to withdrawals). The top three runners in each heat advanced, along with the next four fastest runners overall. This made 40 quarterfinalists, who were divided into 5 heats of 8 runners. The top four runners in each quarterfinal advanced, with one "fastest loser" place. The 16 semifinalists competed in two heats of 8, with the top four in each semifinal advancing to the eight-man final. [1] [3]

Records

These were the standing world and Olympic records (in seconds) prior to the 1996 Summer Olympics.

World Record9.85 Flag of the United States.svg Leroy Burrell Lausanne (SUI)July 6, 1994
Olympic Record9.92 Flag of the United States.svg Carl Lewis Seoul (KOR)September 24, 1988

Donovan Bailey's 9.84 seconds in the final broke both the world and Olympic records.

Schedule

All times are Eastern Daylight Time (UTC-4)

DateTimeRound
Friday, 26 July 199611:00
18:30
Heats
Quarterfinals
Saturday, 27 July 199619:30
21:00
Semifinals
Final

Results

Round 1

Heat 1

Wells had one false start (a second would have resulted in disqualification).

RankLaneAthleteNationReactionTimeNotes
16 Emmanuel Tuffour Flag of Ghana.svg  Ghana 0.18710.15 Q
25 Bruny Surin Flag of Canada.svg  Canada 0.16810.18 Q
32 Andrey Fedoriv Flag of Russia.svg  Russia 0.15910.39 Q
41 Renward Wells Flag of the Bahamas.svg  Bahamas 0.15610.48
53 Chithaka De Soyza Flag of Sri Lanka.svg  Sri Lanka 0.17310.55
67 Luís Cunha Flag of Portugal.svg  Portugal 0.14910.65
79 Patrick Mocci Roumbe Flag of Gabon.svg  Gabon 0.18510.87
88 Nordine Ould Menira Flag of Mauritania (1959-2017).svg  Mauritania 0.18610.95
94 Bonifacio Edu Flag of Equatorial Guinea.svg  Equatorial Guinea 0.19811.87
Wind: −0.9 m/s

Heat 2

RankLaneAthleteNationTimeNotes
11 Davidson Ezinwa Flag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria 10.03 Q
22 Jon Drummond Flag of the United States.svg  United States 10.08 Q
39 Erik Wymeersch Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Belgium 10.24 Q
45 Leon Gordon Flag of Jamaica.svg  Jamaica 10.48
56 Stefan Burkart Flag of Switzerland.svg  Switzerland 10.49
67 Barnabe Jolicoeur Flag of Mauritius.svg  Mauritius 10.57
74 Bimal Tarafdar Flag of Bangladesh.svg  Bangladesh 10.98
83 Abdul Ghafoor Flag of Afghanistan (1992-2001).svg  Afghanistan 12.20
8 Andrew Tynes Flag of the Bahamas.svg  Bahamas DNS

Heat 3

Markoullides had one false start (a second would have resulted in disqualification).

RankLaneAthleteNationTimeNotes
15 Ato Boldon Flag of Trinidad and Tobago.svg  Trinidad and Tobago 10.06 Q
27 Anninos Markoullides Flag of Cyprus (1960-2006).svg  Cyprus 10.26 Q
32 Kim Collins Flag of Saint Kitts and Nevis.svg  Saint Kitts and Nevis 10.27 Q
48 Augustine Nketia Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand 10.34 q
54 Raymond Stewart Flag of Jamaica.svg  Jamaica 10.38 q
69 Stefano Tilli Flag of Italy.svg  Italy 10.38
76 Jamal Al-Saffar Flag of Saudi Arabia.svg  Saudi Arabia 10.44
83 Amarildo Almeida Flag of Guinea-Bissau.svg  Guinea-Bissau 10.85
91 Mohamed Bakar Flag of the Comoros (1992-1996).svg  Comoros 11.02

Heat 4

RankLaneAthleteNationTimeNotes
17 Michael Green Flag of Jamaica.svg  Jamaica 10.16 Q
29 Patrick Stevens Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Belgium 10.21 Q
38 Serhiy Osovych Flag of Ukraine.svg  Ukraine 10.29 Q
41 Ezio Madonia Flag of Italy.svg  Italy 10.33 q
52 Edson Ribeiro Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil 10.39
63 Chris Donaldson Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand 10.39
75 Patrik Strenius Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden 10.48
84 Toluta'u Koula Flag of Tonga.svg  Tonga 10.71
96 Vladislav Chernobay Flag of Kyrgyzstan.svg  Kyrgyzstan 10.88

Heat 5

Borrega had one false start (a second would have resulted in disqualification).

RankLaneAthleteNationTimeNotes
12 Deji Aliu Flag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria 10.34 Q
28 Ousmane Diarra Flag of Mali.svg  Mali 10.34 Q
33 Wenzhong Chen Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China 10.37 Q
46 Manuel Borrega Flag of Spain.svg  Spain 10.52
57 Hiroyasu Tsuchie Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg  Japan 10.58
69 Ruben Benitez Flag of El Salvador.svg  El Salvador 10.74
71 Vitaly Medvedev Flag of Kazakhstan.svg  Kazakhstan 10.90
84 Mitchell Peters Flag of the United States Virgin Islands.svg  Virgin Islands 11.12
95 Bouriema Kimba Flag of Niger.svg  Niger 11.24

Heat 6

RankLaneAthleteNationTimeNotes
14 Dennis Mitchell Flag of the United States.svg  United States 10.24 Q
27 Ian Mackie Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain 10.27 Q
33 Marc Blume Flag of Germany.svg  Germany 10.33 Q
49 Alexandros Terzian Flag of Greece.svg  Greece 10.48
51 Franck Amegnigan Flag of Togo.svg  Togo 10.51
66 Rod Mapstone Flag of Australia.svg  Australia 10.56
78 Sayon Cooper Flag of Liberia.svg  Liberia 10.58
82 Pa Modou Gai Flag of The Gambia.svg  The Gambia 10.72
95 Jorge Castellon Flag of Bolivia.svg  Bolivia 10.74

Heat 7

RankLaneAthleteNationTimeNotes
11 Obadele Thompson Flag of Barbados.svg  Barbados 10.33 Q
25 Kostyantyn Rurak Flag of Ukraine.svg  Ukraine 10.37 Q
39 Pascal Theophile Flag of France.svg  France 10.41 Q
42 Carlos Gats Flag of Argentina.svg  Argentina 10.57
53 Joel Mascoll Flag of Saint Vincent and the Grenadines.svg  Saint Vincent and the Grenadines 10.64
66 Anvar Kuchmuradov Flag of Uzbekistan.svg  Uzbekistan 10.71
74 Arif Akhundov Flag of Azerbaijan.svg  Azerbaijan 11.11
88 Khaled Othman Flag of Libya (1977-2011).svg  Libya 11.65
97 Jean-Olivier Zirignon Flag of Cote d'Ivoire.svg  Ivory Coast 22.69

Heat 8

Silva had one false start (a second would have resulted in disqualification).

RankLaneAthleteNationTimeNotes
17 Michael Marsh Flag of the United States.svg  United States 10.14 Q
28 Darren Braithwaite Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain 10.29 Q
39 Kirk Cummins Flag of Barbados.svg  Barbados 10.47 Q
45 Torbjörn Eriksson Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden 10.49
56 Paul Henderson Flag of Australia.svg  Australia 10.52
63 Alberto Mendez Flag of the Dominican Republic.svg  Dominican Republic 10.60
72 Arnaldo da Silva Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil 10.62
81 Mario Bonello Flag of Malta.svg  Malta 10.89
94 Odair Baia Flag of Sao Tome and Principe.svg  São Tomé and Príncipe 11.05

Heat 9

Douhou had one false start (a second would have resulted in disqualification).

RankLaneAthleteNationTimeNotes
18 André da Silva Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil 10.25 Q
25 Linford Christie Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain 10.26 Q
36 Yiannis Zisimides Flag of Cyprus (1960-2006).svg  Cyprus 10.32 Q
41 Venancio Jose Flag of Spain.svg  Spain 10.34 q
59 Hamed Douhou Flag of Cote d'Ivoire.svg  Ivory Coast 10.53
67 Robert Dennis Flag of Liberia.svg  Liberia 10.65
72 Donald Onchiri Flag of Kenya.svg  Kenya 10.66
83 Sun-Kuk Jin Flag of South Korea (1984-1997).svg  South Korea 10.73
94 Peter Pulu Flag of Papua New Guinea.svg  Papua New Guinea 10.76

Heat 10

RankLaneAthleteNationTimeNotes
15 Eric Nkansah Flag of Ghana.svg  Ghana 10.26 Q
22 Needy Guims Flag of France.svg  France 10.39 Q
31 Olapade Adeniken Flag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria 10.41 Q
47 Jone Delai Flag of Fiji.svg  Fiji 10.42
58 Vitaliy Savin Flag of Kazakhstan.svg  Kazakhstan 10.52
69 Watson Nyambek Flag of Malaysia.svg  Malaysia 10.55
76 Neil Ryan Flag of Ireland.svg  Ireland 10.78
83 Javier Verne Flag of Peru.svg  Peru 10.91
94 Van Lam Hai Flag of Vietnam.svg  Vietnam 11.14

Heat 11

Karlsson had one false start (a second would have resulted in disqualification).

RankLaneAthleteNationTimeNotes
13 Donovan Bailey Flag of Canada.svg  Canada 10.24 Q
21 Nobuharu Asahara Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg  Japan 10.28 Q
32 Peter Karlsson Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden 10.35 Q
46 Sanusi Turay Flag of Sierra Leone.svg  Sierra Leone 10.39
59 Sergejs Insakovs Flag of Latvia.svg  Latvia 10.42
68 Haralambos Papadias Flag of Greece.svg  Greece 10.46
77 Hsin-Ping Huang Flag of Chinese Taipei for Olympic games.svg  Chinese Taipei 10.70
84 Eric Agueh Flag of Benin.svg  Benin 10.98
5 Alfayaya Embalo Flag of Cape Verde.svg  Cape Verde DNS

Heat 12

RankLaneAthleteNationTimeNotes
14 Frank Fredericks Flag of Namibia.svg  Namibia 10.32 Q
21 Glenroy Gilbert Flag of Canada.svg  Canada 10.34 Q
33 Alexandros Yenovelis Flag of Greece.svg  Greece 10.39 Q
46 Frutos Feo Flag of Spain.svg  Spain 10.56
58 Benjamin Sirimou Flag of Cameroon.svg  Cameroon 10.58
67 Hamed Sadeq Flag of Kuwait.svg  Kuwait 10.81
79 Devon Bean Flag of Bermuda (1910-1999).svg  Bermuda 10.89
85 Robert Loua Flag of Guinea.svg  Guinea 11.21
92 Mark Sherwin Flag of the Cook Islands.svg  Cook Islands 11.41

Quarterfinals

Quarterfinal 1

RankLaneAthleteNationTimeNotes
15 Ato Boldon Flag of Trinidad and Tobago.svg  Trinidad and Tobago 9.95 Q
23 Nobuharu Asahara Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg  Japan 10.19 Q
36 Eric Nkansah Flag of Ghana.svg  Ghana 10.24 Q
44 Deji Aliu Flag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria 10.26
57 Glenroy Gilbert Flag of Canada.svg  Canada 10.28
68 Marc Blume Flag of Germany.svg  Germany 10.33
71 Andrey Fedoriv Flag of Russia.svg  Russia 10.34
82 Augustine Nketia Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand 10.35

Quarterfinal 2

RankLaneAthleteNationTimeNotes
16 Linford Christie Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain 10.03 Q
25 Donovan Bailey Flag of Canada.svg  Canada 10.05 Q
33 Jon Drummond Flag of the United States.svg  United States 10.17 Q
44 Emmanuel Tuffour Flag of Ghana.svg  Ghana 10.18 q
52 Erik Wymeersch Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Belgium 10.37
67 Olapade Adeniken Flag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria 10.38
78 Needy Guims Flag of France.svg  France 10.43
81 Ezio Madonia Flag of Italy.svg  Italy 10.43

Quarterfinal 3

RankLaneAthleteNationTimeNotes
15 Frank Fredericks Flag of Namibia.svg  Namibia 9.93 Q
23 Davidson Ezinwa Flag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria 10.08 Q
34 Obadele Thompson Flag of Barbados.svg  Barbados 10.14 Q
48 Raymond Stewart Flag of Jamaica.svg  Jamaica 10.18
57 Peter Karlsson Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden 10.24
66 Darren Braithwaite Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain 10.27
72 Wenzhong Chen Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China 10.29
81 Ousmane Diarra Flag of Mali.svg  Mali 10.38

Quarterfinal 4

RankLaneAthleteNationTimeNotes
16 Dennis Mitchell Flag of the United States.svg  United States 10.09 Q
23 Michael Green Flag of Jamaica.svg  Jamaica 10.11 Q
34 Anninos Markoullides Flag of Cyprus (1960-2006).svg  Cyprus 10.23 Q
45 Patrick Stevens Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Belgium 10.31
52 Kim Collins Flag of Saint Kitts and Nevis.svg  Saint Kitts and Nevis 10.34
61 Pascal Theophile Flag of France.svg  France 10.38
77 Serhiy Osovych Flag of Ukraine.svg  Ukraine 10.38
88 Kirk Cummins Flag of Barbados.svg  Barbados 10.45

Quarterfinal 5

RankLaneAthleteNationTimeNotes
16 Michael Marsh Flag of the United States.svg  United States 10.04 Q
24 Bruny Surin Flag of Canada.svg  Canada 10.13 Q
35 Ian Mackie Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain 10.25 Q
43 André da Silva Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil 10.26
52 Alexandros Yenovelis Flag of Greece.svg  Greece 10.31
61 Venancio Jose Flag of Spain.svg  Spain 10.46
77 Kostyantyn Rurak Flag of Ukraine.svg  Ukraine 10.47
88 Yiannis Zisimides Flag of Cyprus (1960-2006).svg  Cyprus 10.47

Semifinals

Semifinal 1

Bailey had one false start (a second would have resulted in disqualification).

RankLaneAthleteNationTimeNotes
15 Frank Fredericks Flag of Namibia.svg  Namibia 9.94 Q
23 Donovan Bailey Flag of Canada.svg  Canada 10.00 Q
36 Michael Marsh Flag of the United States.svg  United States 10.08 Q
44 Michael Green Flag of Jamaica.svg  Jamaica 10.11 Q
51 Nobuharu Asahara Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg  Japan 10.16
68 Obadele Thompson Flag of Barbados.svg  Barbados 10.16
72 Emmanuel Tuffour Flag of Ghana.svg  Ghana 10.22
87 Anninos Markoullides Flag of Cyprus (1960-2006).svg  Cyprus 10.36

Semifinal 2

RankLaneAthleteNationTimeNotes
13 Ato Boldon Flag of Trinidad and Tobago.svg  Trinidad and Tobago 9.93 Q
25 Dennis Mitchell Flag of the United States.svg  United States 10.00 Q
36 Linford Christie Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain 10.04 Q
44 Davidson Ezinwa Flag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria 10.04 Q
51 Bruny Surin Flag of Canada.svg  Canada 10.13
62 Jon Drummond Flag of the United States.svg  United States 10.16
78 Eric Nkansah Flag of Ghana.svg  Ghana 10.26
7 Ian Mackie Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain DNS

Final

The final was held on July 27, 1996. Christie was disqualified after two false starts. Boldon also had one false start. [4]

RankLaneAthleteNationTimeNotes
Gold medal icon.svg6 Donovan Bailey Flag of Canada.svg  Canada 9.84 WR
Silver medal icon.svg5 Frank Fredericks Flag of Namibia.svg  Namibia 9.89
Bronze medal icon.svg3 Ato Boldon Flag of Trinidad and Tobago.svg  Trinidad and Tobago 9.90
44 Dennis Mitchell Flag of the United States.svg  United States 9.99
51 Michael Marsh Flag of the United States.svg  United States 10.00
67 Davidson Ezinwa Flag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria 10.14
78 Michael Green Flag of Jamaica.svg  Jamaica 10.16
2 Linford Christie Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain DSQ

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References

  1. 1 2 3 "100 metres, Men". Olympedia. Retrieved 24 July 2020.
  2. https://www.nytimes.com/1996/07/29/sports/IHT-chaotic-100-meters-ends-with-record.html
  3. Official Report, vol. 3, pp. 68–69.
  4. Official Report, vol. 3, p. 69.