Athletics at the 2004 Summer Olympics – Men's 100 metres

Last updated
Men's 100 metres
at the Games of the XXVIII Olympiad
Venue Athens Olympic Stadium
Date21–22 August
Competitors82 from 62 nations
Winning time9.85 s
Medalists
Gold medal icon.svg Justin Gatlin Flag of the United States.svg  United States
Silver medal icon.svg Francis Obikwelu Flag of Portugal.svg  Portugal
Bronze medal icon.svg Maurice Greene Flag of the United States.svg  United States
  2000
2008  

The men's 100 metres was of one of 23 track events of the athletics at the 2004 Summer Olympics , in Athens. It was contested at the Athens Olympic Stadium, from August 21 to 22, by a total of 82 sprinters from 62 nations. [1] [2] Each nation was limited to 3 athletes per rules in force since the 1930 Olympic Congress.

Contents

The event was won by Justin Gatlin of the United States, the nation's second consecutive title and 16th overall in the event. Portugal earned its first medal in the men's 100 metres, with Francis Obikwelu's silver. The final was the fastest and most disputed in Olympic history, with six runners covering the distance in 10.00 seconds or less (four of them under the 9.90 mark), and the gold and bronze medalist athletes separated by 0.02 seconds.

Background

This was the twenty-fifth time the event was held, having appeared at every Olympics since the first in 1896. All three finalists from 2000 returned: defending gold medalist Maurice Greene of the United States, silver medalist Ato Boldon of Trinidad and Tobago, and bronze medalist Obadele Thompson of Barbados, along with three other finalists (Darren Campbell of Great Britain, Kim Collins of Saint Kitts and Nevis, and Aziz Zakari of Ghana). Two-time silver medalist (1992 and 1996) Frankie Fredericks of Namibia also returned after missing the Sydney Games with injury.

Collins was the reigning (2003) world champion, as well as Commonwealth champion. Francis Obikwelu of Portugal had won the 2002 European Championship. On the United States team, along with an aging Greene (still a medal contender, but no longer as dominant as in 2000), was a young Justin Gatlin. [2]

Aruba, Jordan, Kiribati, the Federated States of Micronesia, and Slovenia appeared in the event for the first time. The United States made its 24rd appearance in the event, most of any country, having missed only the boycotted 1980 Games.

Qualification

The Olympic qualification period for the athletics ran from 1 January 2003 to 9 August 2004. For this event, each National Olympic Committee (NOC) was permitted to enter up to three athletes, provided they had run below 10.21 seconds during this period in IAAF-sanctioned meetings or tournaments. If a NOC had no athletes qualified under this standard, it could enter up to one athlete that had run below 10.28 seconds.

Competition format

The event retained the same basic four round format introduced in 1920: heats, quarterfinals, semifinals, and a final. The "fastest loser" system, introduced in 1968, was used again to ensure that the quarterfinals and subsequent rounds had exactly 8 runners per heat; this time, the system was used in both the heats and quarterfinals.

The first round consisted of 10 heats, each with 8 or 9 athletes. The top three runners in each heat advanced, along with the next ten fastest runners overall. This made 40 quarterfinalists, who were divided into 5 heats of 8 runners. The top three runners in each quarterfinal advanced, with one "fastest loser" place. The 16 semifinalists competed in two heats of 8, with the top four in each semifinal advancing to the eight-man final. [2]

Records

Prior to the competition, the existing World and Olympic records were as follows.

World recordFlag of the United States.svg  Tim Montgomery  (USA)9.78 s Paris, France 14 September 2002
Olympic recordFlag of Canada.svg  Donovan Bailey  (CAN)9.84 s Atlanta, United States 27 July 1996

No new records were set during the competition.

Schedule

All times are Eastern European Summer Time (UTC+3)

DateTimeRound
Saturday, 21 August 200410:35
19:40
Round 1
Round 2
Sunday, 22 August 200420:55
23:10
Semifinals
Final

Results

Round 1

Qualification rule: The first three finishers in each heat (Q) plus the ten fastest times of those who finished fourth or lower in their heat (q) qualified. [3]

Heat 1

RankLaneAthleteNationReactionTimeNotes
15 Frankie Fredericks Flag of Namibia.svg  Namibia 0.15210.12Q, SB
23 Uchenna Emedolu Flag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria 0.22210.22Q
34 Shingo Suetsugu Flag of Japan.svg  Japan 0.17410.27Q
47 Darren Campbell Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain 0.15910.35
59 Chen Haijian Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China 0.18110.45
62 Eric Nkansah Flag of Ghana.svg  Ghana 0.16010.54
76 Poh Seng Song Flag of Singapore.svg  Singapore 0.16010.75
88 Yazaldes Nascimento Flag of Sao Tome and Principe.svg  São Tomé and Príncipe 0.18511.00
Wind: −0.2 m/s

Heat 2

RankLaneAthleteNationReactionTimeNotes
15 Mark Lewis-Francis Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain 0.14910.13Q, SB
27 Aziz Zakari Flag of Ghana.svg  Ghana 0.18810.19Q
36 Roland Németh Flag of Hungary.svg  Hungary 0.13710.28Q
43 Salem Mubarak Al Yami Flag of Saudi Arabia.svg  Saudi Arabia 0.14310.36
54 Darren Gilford Flag of Malta.svg  Malta 0.17710.67
68 Khalil Al Hanahneh Flag of Jordan.svg  Jordan 0.17210.76
72 Kakianako Nariki Flag of Kiribati.svg  Kiribati 0.18311.62
9 Marc Burns Flag of Trinidad and Tobago.svg  Trinidad and Tobago DSQR 162.7
Wind: −0.4 m/s

Heat 3

RankLaneAthleteNationReactionTimeNotes
18 Justin Gatlin Flag of the United States.svg  United States 0.20410.07Q
26 Kareem Streete-Thompson Flag of the Cayman Islands.svg  Cayman Islands 0.15610.15Q, SB
39 Leonard Myles-Mills Flag of Ghana.svg  Ghana 0.13310.21Q, SB
44 Vicente de Lima Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil 0.16910.23q
51 Andrey Yepishin Flag of Russia.svg  Russia 0.14610.29q
62 Georgios Theodoridis Flag of Greece.svg  Greece 0.14110.32q
75 Hadhari Djaffar Flag of the Comoros.svg  Comoros 0.16310.62
87 Sultan Saeed Flag of Maldives.svg  Maldives 0.23911.72
3 Juan Sainfleur Flag of the Dominican Republic.svg  Dominican Republic 0.164DNF
Wind: −0.1 m/s

Heat 4

RankLaneAthleteNationReactionTimeNotes
16 Shawn Crawford Flag of the United States.svg  United States 0.18410.02Q
21 Obadele Thompson Flag of Barbados.svg  Barbados 0.14110.08Q, SB
34 Matic Osovnikar Flag of Slovenia.svg  Slovenia 0.11210.15Q, NR
45 Idrissa Sanou Flag of Burkina Faso.svg  Burkina Faso 0.17510.33q
53 Diego Ferreira Flag of Paraguay (1990-2013).svg  Paraguay 0.14110.50 NR
69 Pierre de Windt Flag of Aruba.svg  Aruba 0.23411.02
77 Chamleunesouk Ao Oudomphonh Flag of Laos.svg  Laos 0.20211.30
88 Masoud Azizi Flag of Afghanistan.svg  Afghanistan 0.21711.66
2 Hristoforos Hoidis Flag of Greece.svg  Greece DNS
Wind: +0.8 m/s

Heat 5

RankLaneAthleteNationReactionTimeNotes
12 Francis Obikwelu Flag of Portugal.svg  Portugal 0.16510.09Q
25 Ronald Pognon Flag of France.svg  France 0.15010.18Q
33 Jaysuma Saidy Ndure Flag of The Gambia.svg  The Gambia 0.15710.26Q, NR
48 Jarbas Mascarenhas Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil 0.14710.34q
57 Hiroyasu Tsuchie Flag of Japan.svg  Japan 0.18210.37
69 Adrian Durant Flag of the United States Virgin Islands.svg  Virgin Islands 0.22310.52
76 Nabie Foday Fofanah Flag of Guinea.svg  Guinea 0.15810.62
84 Harmon Harmon Flag of the Cook Islands.svg  Cook Islands 0.17311.22PB
Wind: +0.1 m/s

Heat 6

RankLaneAthleteNationReactionTimeNotes
17 Nobuharu Asahara Flag of Japan.svg  Japan 0.16210.33Q
23 Łukasz Chyła Flag of Poland.svg  Poland 0.16710.35Q
34 Eric Pacome N'Dri Flag of Cote d'Ivoire.svg  Ivory Coast 0.14710.39Q
49 Ato Boldon Flag of Trinidad and Tobago.svg  Trinidad and Tobago 0.15510.41
56 Issa Aime Nthepe Flag of France.svg  France 0.15910.67
62 Gábor Dobos Flag of Hungary.svg  Hungary 0.13110.68
78 John Howard Flag of the Federated States of Micronesia.svg  Federated States of Micronesia 0.19510.85 NR
85 Mohammad Shamsuddin Flag of Bangladesh.svg  Bangladesh 0.17311.13
Wind: −1.1 m/s

Heat 7

RankLaneAthleteNationReactionTimeNotes
19 Asafa Powell Flag of Jamaica.svg  Jamaica 0.14610.06Q
25 Jason Gardener Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain 0.15510.15Q, SB
34 Joshua Ross Flag of Australia.svg  Australia 0.15310.24Q, =PB
41 André da Silva Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil 0.14510.28q
58 Pierre Browne Flag of Canada.svg  Canada 0.16910.32q
67 Lamin Tucker Flag of Sierra Leone.svg  Sierra Leone 0.13710.72
76 Kelsey Nakanelua Flag of American Samoa.svg  American Samoa 0.16011.25
82 Sopheak Phouk Flag of Cambodia.svg  Cambodia 0.22511.56PB
3 Djikoloum Mobele Flag of Chad.svg  Chad DNS
Wind: +0.9 m/s

Heat 8

RankLaneAthleteNationReactionTimeNotes
11 Maurice Greene Flag of the United States.svg  United States 0.14210.18Q
22 Dwight Thomas Flag of Jamaica.svg  Jamaica 0.13510.21Q
38 Churandy Martina Flag of the Netherlands Antilles (1986-2010).svg  Netherlands Antilles 0.15210.23Q
43 Alexander Kosenkow Flag of Germany.svg  Germany 0.13510.28q
56 Prodromos Katsantonis Flag of Cyprus (1960-2006).svg  Cyprus 0.17910.50SB
67 Chiang Wai Hung Flag of Hong Kong.svg  Hong Kong 0.15710.70
79 Francis Manioru Flag of the Solomon Islands.svg  Solomon Islands 0.14311.05
85 Teymur Gasimov Flag of Azerbaijan.svg  Azerbaijan 0.17911.17
94 Filipo Muller Flag of Tonga.svg  Tonga 0.18111.18PB
Wind: −0.2 m/s

Heat 9

RankLaneAthleteNationReactionTimeNotes
19 Deji Aliu Flag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria 0.19110.39Q
22 Nicolas Macrozonaris Flag of Canada.svg  Canada 0.15310.40Q
36 Gennadiy Chernovol Flag of Kazakhstan.svg  Kazakhstan 0.14510.43Q
43 Souhalia Alamou Flag of Benin.svg  Benin 0.16710.48
58 Christie van Wyk Flag of Namibia.svg  Namibia 0.14810.49
64 Daniel Bailey Flag of Antigua and Barbuda.svg  Antigua and Barbuda 0.15410.51
77 Gian Nicola Berardi Flag of San Marino (before 2011).svg  San Marino 0.14310.76
85 Carlos Abaunza Flag of Nicaragua.svg  Nicaragua 0.17311.17
Wind: −1.4 m/s

Heat 10

RankLaneAthleteNationReactionTimeNotes
16 Kim Collins Flag of Saint Kitts and Nevis.svg  Saint Kitts and Nevis 0.15410.11Q
23 Michael Frater Flag of Jamaica.svg  Jamaica 0.16110.20Q
34 Nicconnor Alexander Flag of Trinidad and Tobago.svg  Trinidad and Tobago 0.13910.22Q
47 Simone Collio Flag of Italy (2003-2006).svg  Italy 0.15110.27q
52 Eddy de Lepine Flag of France.svg  France 0.19210.27q
68 Xavier James Flag of Bermuda.svg  Bermuda 0.14710.40SB
79 Sebastien Gattuso Flag of Monaco.svg  Monaco 0.15210.58 =NR
85 Wilfried Bingangoye Flag of Gabon.svg  Gabon 0.20610.76PB
Wind: +0.7 m/s

Quarterfinals

Qualification rule: The first three finishers in each heat (Q) plus the next fastest overall sprinter (q) qualified. [4]

Quarterfinal 1

RankLaneAthleteNationReactionTimeNotes
14 Francis Obikwelu Flag of Portugal.svg  Portugal 0.1659.93Q, NR
25 Mark Lewis-Francis Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain 0.16210.12Q, =PB
33 Dwight Thomas Flag of Jamaica.svg  Jamaica 0.14910.12Q, SB
46 Ronald Pognon Flag of France.svg  France 0.16610.15q
58 Shingo Suetsugu Flag of Japan.svg  Japan 0.15010.19
62 Pierre Browne Flag of Canada.svg  Canada 0.15010.21
77 Churandy Martina Flag of the Netherlands Antilles (1986-2010).svg  Netherlands Antilles 0.15210.24
81 André da Silva Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil 0.13610.34
Wind: 0.0 m/s

Quarterfinal 2

RankLaneAthleteNationReactionTimeNotes
14 Shawn Crawford Flag of the United States.svg  United States 0.1679.89Q
23 Obadele Thompson Flag of Barbados.svg  Barbados 0.15610.12Q
37 Vicente de Lima Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil 0.15810.26Q
42 Matic Osovnikar Flag of Slovenia.svg  Slovenia 0.16810.26
56 Deji Aliu Flag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria 0.18510.26
65 Nicolas Macrozonaris Flag of Canada.svg  Canada 0.16110.28
71 Gennadiy Chernovol Flag of Kazakhstan.svg  Kazakhstan 0.15410.42
88 Idrissa Sanou Flag of Burkina Faso.svg  Burkina Faso 0.17810.43
Wind: 0.0 m/s

Quarterfinal 3

RankLaneAthleteNationReactionTimeNotes
14 Justin Gatlin Flag of the United States.svg  United States 0.1789.96Q
23 Jason Gardener Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain 0.14610.15Q, =SB
35 Uchenna Emedolu Flag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria 0.16210.15Q
46 Nobuharu Asahara Flag of Japan.svg  Japan 0.15110.24
52 Georgios Theodoridis Flag of Greece.svg  Greece 0.14110.36
67 Roland Németh Flag of Hungary.svg  Hungary 0.15110.38
78 Nicconnor Alexander Flag of Trinidad and Tobago.svg  Trinidad and Tobago 0.14810.48
1 Eddy de Lepine Flag of France.svg  France DNS
Wind: +0.2 m/s

Quarterfinal 4

RankLaneAthleteNationReactionTimeNotes
14 Aziz Zakari Flag of Ghana.svg  Ghana 0.17510.02Q
26 Kim Collins Flag of Saint Kitts and Nevis.svg  Saint Kitts and Nevis 0.15210.05Q, SB
35 Michael Frater Flag of Jamaica.svg  Jamaica 0.15210.11Q
43 Frankie Fredericks Flag of Namibia.svg  Namibia 0.14210.17
57 Joshua Ross Flag of Australia.svg  Australia 0.16310.22PB
61 Alexander Kosenkow Flag of Germany.svg  Germany 0.11310.24
72 Andrey Yepishin Flag of Russia.svg  Russia 0.16410.29
88 Jaysuma Saidy Ndure Flag of The Gambia.svg  The Gambia 0.18410.39
Wind: −0.1 m/s

Quarterfinal 5

RankLaneAthleteNationReactionTimeNotes
14 Maurice Greene Flag of the United States.svg  United States 0.1179.93Q
26 Asafa Powell Flag of Jamaica.svg  Jamaica 0.1429.99Q
31 Leonard Myles-Mills Flag of Ghana.svg  Ghana 0.14510.18Q, SB
45 Łukasz Chyła Flag of Poland.svg  Poland 0.16710.23
53 Kareem Streete-Thompson Flag of the Cayman Islands.svg  Cayman Islands 0.16210.24
68 Simone Collio Flag of Italy (2003-2006).svg  Italy 0.13510.29
72 Jarbas Mascarenhas Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil 0.13410.30
87 Eric Pacome N'Dri Flag of Cote d'Ivoire.svg  Ivory Coast 0.13710.32
Wind: −0.2 m/s

Semifinals

Qualification rule: The first four runners in each semifinal heat (Q) moves on to the final. [5]

Semifinal 1

RankLaneAthleteNationReactionTimeNotes
13 Shawn Crawford Flag of the United States.svg  United States 0.17310.07Q
24 Justin Gatlin Flag of the United States.svg  United States 0.19110.09Q
36 Aziz Zakari Flag of Ghana.svg  Ghana 0.15510.11Q
48 Obadele Thompson Flag of Barbados.svg  Barbados 0.16010.22Q
55 Mark Lewis-Francis Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain 0.16310.28
62 Michael Frater Flag of Jamaica.svg  Jamaica 0.14610.29
71 Ronald Pognon Flag of France.svg  France 0.14410.32
87 Uchenna Emedolu Flag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria 0.18810.35
Wind: −1.6 m/s

Semifinal 2

RankLaneAthleteNationReactionTimeNotes
14 Asafa Powell Flag of Jamaica.svg  Jamaica 0.1589.95Q
25 Francis Obikwelu Flag of Portugal.svg  Portugal 0.1819.97Q
36 Maurice Greene Flag of the United States.svg  United States 0.1259.97Q
43 Kim Collins Flag of Saint Kitts and Nevis.svg  Saint Kitts and Nevis 0.15010.02Q, SB
58 Jason Gardener Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain 0.14710.12SB
61 Leonard Myles-Mills Flag of Ghana.svg  Ghana 0.13910.22
77 Dwight Thomas Flag of Jamaica.svg  Jamaica 0.15610.28
82 Vicente de Lima Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil 0.16310.28
Wind: +0.2 m/s

Final

In the final, the slowest to react was Justin Gatlin, still with the most powerful first steps, Gatlin led from the gun, with Kim Collins, the next slowest to react, also getting a typically fast start (typically in lane 1). A step behind, back from injuries, defending champion Maurice Greene, was fastest to react but running sideways in quicksand. He was joined by Francis Obikwelu and Shawn Crawford, who had a slight edge on the other competitors in the center of the track. Collins faded as Obikwelu, Crawford and Greene gained. Feeling his lead disappearing rapidly, Gatlin leaned early still maintaining the lead across the line. The tall Obikwelu perfectly timed his dip to clearly grab silver. Crawford's finish occurred two meters too late giving Greene another medal with the same time as his win four years earlier. [6] [7] [8]

RankLaneAthleteNationReactionTimeNotes
Gold medal icon.svg3 Justin Gatlin Flag of the United States.svg  United States 0.1889.85PB
Silver medal icon.svg5 Francis Obikwelu Flag of Portugal.svg  Portugal 0.1639.86 EU
Bronze medal icon.svg7 Maurice Greene Flag of the United States.svg  United States 0.1519.87SB
44 Shawn Crawford Flag of the United States.svg  United States 0.1619.89PB
56 Asafa Powell Flag of Jamaica.svg  Jamaica 0.1669.94
61 Kim Collins Flag of Saint Kitts and Nevis.svg  Saint Kitts and Nevis 0.17510.00SB
78 Obadele Thompson Flag of Barbados.svg  Barbados 0.16410.10
2 Aziz Zakari Flag of Ghana.svg  Ghana 0.178DNF
Wind: +0.6 m/s

Related Research Articles

Netherlands Antilles at the 2004 Summer Olympics Sporting event delegation

The Netherlands Antilles competed at the 2004 Summer Olympics in Athens, Greece, from 13 to 29 August 2004, sending track athletes Churandy Martina and Geronimo Goeloe and equestrian athlete Eddy Stibbe. The 2004 Games were the Netherlands Antilles' twelfth appearance in the Summer Olympics; they first competed at the 1952 Summer Olympics in Helsinki, Finland. Before the 2004 games, the Netherlands Antilles had won one medal, a silver in sailing at the 1988 Summer Olympics, by Jan Boersma. There were no Dutch Antillean medalists at the Athens Olympics, although Martina advanced to the quarterfinal round in his event. The Dutch Antillean flagbearer at the ceremonies was Churandy Martina.

Portugal at the 2004 Summer Olympics Sporting event delegation

Portugal competed at the 2004 Summer Olympics in Athens, Greece, from 13 to 29 August 2004. Portuguese athletes have competed at every Summer Olympic Games in the modern era since 1912. The Olympic Committee of Portugal sent the nation's second-largest team to the Games. A total of 81 athletes, 64 men and 17 women, were selected by the committee to participate in 15 sports. Men's football was the only team-based sport in which Portugal had its representation at these Games. There was only a single competitor in badminton, canoeing, equestrian, artistic and trampoline gymnastics, triathlon, and wrestling, which made its official Olympic comeback after an eight-year absence.

The women's 100 metres at the 2004 Summer Olympics as part of the athletics program were held at the Athens Olympic Stadium from August 20 to 21.

The women's 100 metres hurdles at the 2004 Summer Olympics as part of the athletics program were held at the Athens Olympic Stadium from August 22 to 24.

The men's 200 metres at the 2004 Summer Olympics as part of the athletics program were held at the Athens Olympic Stadium from August 24 to 26.

The women's 200 metres at the 2004 Summer Olympics as part of the athletics program were held at the Athens Olympic Stadium from August 24 to 26.

The men's 400 metres at the 2004 Summer Olympics as part of the athletics program were held at the Athens Olympic Stadium from August 20 to 23. Sixty-two athletes from 48 nations competed. The event was won by Jeremy Wariner of the United States, the sixth in what would ultimately be 7 consecutive American victories stretching from 1984 to 2008 and the 18th overall title in the event by the United States. The United States swept the podium for the 4th time in the event.

The men's 400 metres hurdles at the 2004 Summer Olympics as part of the athletics program were held at the Athens Olympic Stadium from August 23 to 26.

The men's 800 metres at the 2004 Summer Olympics as part of the athletics program was held at the Athens Olympic Stadium from August 25 to 28. Seventy-two athletes from 58 nations competed. The event was won by Yuriy Borzakovskiy of Russia, the first medal for the nation in the event. Wilson Kipketer of Denmark became the 10th man to win a second medal in the 800 metres.

Athletics at the 2004 Summer Olympics – Mens 1500 metres

The men's 1500 metres at the 2004 Summer Olympics as part of the athletics program were held at the Athens Olympic Stadium from August 20 to 24. Thirty-eight athletes from 26 nations competed. The event was won by Hicham El Guerrouj of Morocco, the nation's first title in the event after coming second twice ; El Guerrouj was the fifth man to win a second medal in the event. Bernard Lagat's silver put Kenya on the podium in the event for the third straight year; the United States and Great Britain were the only other nations to have accomplished that. It also made Lagat the sixth man to win two medals in the event, just behind El Guerrouj in both 2000 and 2004. Rui Silva's bronze was Portugal's first medal in the event.

The men's 4×100 metres relay at the 2004 Summer Olympics as part of the athletics program was held at the Athens Olympic Stadium from August 27 to 28. The sixteen teams competed in a two-heat qualifying round in which the first three teams from each heat, together with the next two fastest teams, were given a place in the final race.

The men's 100 metres at the 2005 World Championships in Athletics was held at the Helsinki Olympic Stadium on August 6 and August 7.

The men's 100 metres at the 2000 Summer Olympics as part of the athletics program were held at the Stadium Australia from September 22 to 23. Ninety-seven athletes from 71 nations competed. Each nation was limited to 3 athletes per rules in force since the 1930 Olympic Congress. The event was won by American Maurice Greene, the United States's first title in the event since 1988 and 15th overall. Ato Boldon of Trinidad and Tobago improved on his 1996 bronze with a silver in Sydney. Obadele Thompson won the first-ever medal in the men's 100 metres for Barbados with bronze.

The men's 100 metres event was one of the events in the 1980 Summer Olympics in Moscow. The competition was held on July 24, 1980, and on July 25, 1980. Sixty-five athletes from 40 nations competed. Each nation was limited to 3 athletes per rules in force since the 1930 Olympic Congress. The event was won by Allan Wells of Great Britain, that nation's first title in the men's 100 metres since 1924. Cuba took its first medal in the event since 1964, with Silvio Leonard's silver matching the nation's best result. Petar Petrov's bronze was Bulgaria's first Olympic medal in the men's 100 metres.

Athletics at the 2008 Summer Olympics – Mens 100 metres

The men's 100 metres sprint event at the 2008 Olympic Games took place on 15 and 16 August at the Beijing National Stadium. Eighty athletes from 64 nations competed. Each nation was limited to 3 athletes per rules in force since the 1930 Olympic Congress. The final was won by Jamaican Usain Bolt in a world record time of 9.69 seconds. It was Jamaica's first title in the event, and first medal in the event since 1976. Jamaica became the first country to join the men's 100 metre winners since Trinidad and Tobago, also in 1976; Richard Thompson won that country's fourth overall medal in the event with his silver.

Saint Kitts and Nevis at the 2008 Summer Olympics Sporting event delegation

The Saint Kitts and Nevis National Olympic Committee sent four athletes to the 2008 Summer Olympics in Beijing, China. All four participated in the track and field competitions across four different events. Three women and one man comprised the Kittitian delegation. Williams and Ponteen did not advance past Qualifications in their events; Hodge reached quarterfinals in both the 100m and 200m sprints; and Collins, who participated in two events, reached the Semifinal round in the 100m sprint, and ranked sixth in the finals in the 200m sprint. Saint Kitts and Nevis did not win any medals during the Beijing Olympics. The flag bearer for the team at the opening ceremony was first-time Olympian Virgil Hodge.

Athletics at the 2012 Summer Olympics – Mens 100 metres

The men's 100 metres competition at the 2012 Summer Olympics in London, United Kingdom was held at the Olympic Stadium on 4–5 August 2012. Seventy-four athletes from 61 nations competed. Each nation was limited to 3 athletes per rules in force since the 1930 Olympic Congress. The competition comprised four rounds: a preliminary round for entrants without the minimum qualifying standard, a heats round, followed by three semi-finals of eight athletes each, which then reduced to eight athletes for the final.

2011 World Championships in Athletics – Mens 100 metres

The men's 100 metres at the 2011 World Championships in Athletics was held at the Daegu Stadium on August 27 and August 28. The event was won by Yohan Blake of Jamaica, who became the youngest ever world champion in the 100 metres at 21 years, 245 days. The highly favored defending champion and world record holder Usain Bolt was disqualified from the final for making a false start. Seventy four athletes started the competition, with 61 nations being represented. It was the first global final to be held following the introduction of the no-false start rule.

Athletics at the 2004 Summer Olympics – Mens 110 metres hurdles

The men's 110 metre hurdles at the 2004 Summer Olympics as part of the athletics program were held at the Athens Olympic Stadium from August 24 to 27. Forty-seven athletes from 34 nations competed. The event was won by Liu Xiang of China, the nation's first medal in the event. Terrence Trammell and Anier García became the 11th and 12th men to win multiple medals in the 110 metres hurdles.

Athletics at the 2016 Summer Olympics – Mens 100 metres

The men's 100 metres event at the 2016 Summer Olympics took place between 13–14 August at the Olympic Stadium. Eighty-four athletes from 57 nations competed.

References

  1. "Athletics at the 2004 Athens Summer Games: Men's 100 metres". Sports Reference. Archived from the original on 17 April 2020. Retrieved 7 July 2017.
  2. 1 2 3 "100 metres, Men". Olympedia. Retrieved 27 July 2020.
  3. "IAAF Athens 2004: Men's 100m Heats". Athens 2004 . IAAF . Retrieved 10 October 2015.
  4. "IAAF Athens 2004: Men's 100m Quarterfinals". Athens 2004 . IAAF . Retrieved 10 October 2015.
  5. "IAAF Athens 2004: Men's 100m Semifinals". Athens 2004 . IAAF . Retrieved 10 October 2015.
  6. "Gatlin guns to 100m glory". BBC Sport. 22 August 2004. Retrieved 10 October 2015.
  7. "Gatlin guns to 100m glory". BBC Sport. 22 August 2004. Retrieved 10 October 2015.
  8. "IAAF Athens 2004: Men's 100m Final". Athens 2004 . IAAF . Retrieved 10 October 2015.