Cecil Mountford

Last updated

Cecil Mountford
Personal information
Full nameCecil Ralph Mountford
Born(1919-06-16)16 June 1919
South Island, New Zealand
Died19 July 2009(2009-07-19) (aged 90)
Playing information
Position Stand-off
Club
YearsTeamPldTGFGP
1946–51 Wigan 21070550320
1952 Warrington
Total21070550320
Representative
YearsTeamPldTGFGP
1950–50 Other Nationalities 20000
Coaching information
Club
YearsTeamGmsWDLW%
195261 Warrington
197273 Blackpool Borough
Total0000
Representative
YearsTeamGmsWDLW%
197982 New Zealand
As of 2 February 2021

Cecil Ralph Mountford MBE (16 June 1919 – 19 July 2009), also known by the nickname of "The Blackball Bullet", was a New Zealand rugby league footballer and coach. [1] [2]

Contents

Mountford was one of ten siblings, he and four of his brothers played rugby league for the South Island whilst Bill Mountford and Ken Mountford played for New Zealand. Mountford also played for West Coast, along with Bill and Ken, in inter-provincial matches.

Early years

Mountford played soccer at school, as he was considered too small to play rugby league. In 1935 at the age of 16 he joined Blackball Rugby League club, where he earned the nickname 'The Blackball Bullet' due to his speed on the field.

Player for Wigan

Mountford signed for Wigan Rugby League Club in 1946, he shared in one of Wigan’s finest moments in the 1949/50 campaign when, as captain – in place of usual captain Joe Egan who was on tour with seven other Wigan stars – he led his side to a sensational 20-2 Championship Final win over Huddersfield at Maine Road.

Mountford played at Wembley Stadium on two occasions, the first being in 1948, when they beat the current title holders Bradford Northern 8-3 in a nail biting final. The second visit, in 1951, Mountford led the team to a 10-0 victory over Barrow in a rain-soaked Wembley final. He also became the first overseas player to receive the Lance Todd Trophy.

Challenge Cup Final appearances

Cecil Mountford played stand-off in Wigan's 8-3 victory over Bradford Northern in the 1947–48 Challenge Cup Final during the 1947–48 season at Wembley Stadium, London on Saturday 1 May 1948, in front of a crowd of 91,465. [3]

County Cup Final appearances

Cecil Mountford played stand-off in Wigan's 9-3 victory over Belle Vue Rangers in the 1946–47 Lancashire County Cup Final during the 1946–47 season at Station Road, Swinton on Saturday 26 October 1946, [4] played stand-off in the 14-8 victory over Warrington in the 1948–49 Lancashire County Cup Final during the 1948–49 season at Station Road, Swinton on Saturday 13 November 1948, [5] played stand-off in the 20-7 victory over Leigh in the 1949–50 Lancashire County Cup Final during the 1949–50 season at Wilderspool Stadium, Warrington on Saturday 29 October 1949, [6] and played stand-off in the 28-5 victory over Warrington in the 1950–51 Lancashire County Cup Final during the 1950–51 season at Station Road, Swinton on Saturday 4 November 1950. [7]

International career

Internationally he missed out on playing for New Zealand, but he did represent Other Nationalities in two European Championships, in a team labeled "The Rest", in 1950, watched by a crowd of 25,000 fans. He requested, and was granted, permission from Wigan to join the 1947-8 New Zealand tour of Great Britain but the Management decided that injuries were not bad enough to bring him in. [8] Instead, during the Kiwis tour Cecil played for Wigan against the Kiwis, which included his brother Ken.

Mountford was appointed head coach of the New Zealand team in 1979, leading the Kiwis on their 1980 tour of Great Britain and France and the 1982 tour of Australia and Papua New Guinea. New Zealand won 6 games, lost 8 and drew 1 under Mountford's coaching. He was replaced in 1983 by Graham Lowe.

Coaching at Warrington

In 1951 Mountford qualified as a first grade coach, being offered a 10-year contract at Warrington, despite Wigan initially refusing to release him as a player. Mountford made his first appearance for Warrington in October 1952 initially as a player coach.

Championship Final appearances

Cecil Mountford was the coach in Warrington's 8-7 victory over Halifax the Championship Final during the 1953–54 season at Maine Road, Manchester on Saturday 8 May 1954, in front of a crowd of 36,519.

Challenge Cup Final appearances

Cecil Mountford was the coach in Warrington's 8-4 victory over Halifax in the 1953–54 Challenge Cup Final replay during the 1953–54 season at Odsal Stadium, Bradford on Wednesday 5 May 1954, in front of a record crowd of 102,575 or more. [9] At the time, this was a world record attendance for a rugby match of either code. [10]

After completing his tenure as a coach, he returned to New Zealand in May 1961, before heading back to England as Manager of Blackpool Borough in 1972, which was short-lived when he resigned in June 1973. Mountford returned to New Zealand in 1974, initially providing coaching courses before being signed as the manager-coach of the New Zealand national rugby league team from 1979 to 1982.

Honours

In the 1987 Queen's Birthday Honours, Mountford was appointed a Member of the Order of the British Empire, for services to rugby league [11] and in 1990 he was inducted into the New Zealand Sports Hall of Fame. In 2000 he was inducted as one of the NZRL Legends of League. [12]

Genealogical information

Cecil Mountford's marriage to Agnes E. (née Battersby) was registered during first ¼ 1948 in Wigan district. [13] They had children; Carolyn E. Mountford (birth registered during third ¼ 1950 (age 7071) in Wigan district), and Christopher L. K. Mountford (birth registered during first ¼ 1954 (age 6667) in Runcorn district).

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References

  1. "Statistics at rugbyleagueproject.org". rugbyleagueproject.org. 31 December 2017. Retrieved 1 January 2018.CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)[ permanent dead link ]
  2. "Coach Statistics at rugbyleagueproject.org". rugbyleagueproject.org. 31 December 2017. Retrieved 1 January 2018.CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  3. "1947-1948 Challenge Cup Final". wigan.rlfans.com. 31 December 2014. Retrieved 1 January 2015.CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  4. "1946-1947 Lancashire Cup Final". wigan.rlfans.com. 31 December 2014. Retrieved 1 January 2015.CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  5. "1948-1949 Lancashire Cup Final". wigan.rlfans.com. 31 December 2014. Retrieved 1 January 2015.CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  6. "1949-1950 Lancashire Cup Final". wigan.rlfans.com. 31 December 2014. Retrieved 1 January 2015.CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  7. "1950-1951 Lancashire Cup Final". wigan.rlfans.com. 31 December 2014. Retrieved 1 January 2015.CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  8. Coffey and Wood The Kiwis: 100 Years of International Rugby League ISBN   1-86971-090-8
  9. "Mud, blood and memories of the day when 102,575 made history at Odsal". The independent. 31 December 2016. Retrieved 1 January 2017.CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  10. Baker, Andrew (20 August 1995). "100 years of rugby league: From the great divide to the Super era". Independent, The . independent.co.uk. Retrieved 25 September 2009.CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  11. "No. 50950". The London Gazette (4th supplement). 13 June 1987. p. 32.
  12. "New Zealand Rugby League Annual Report 2008" (PDF). NZRL. 2008. Archived from the original (PDF) on 12 September 2009. Retrieved 21 July 2009.CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  13. "Marriage details at freebmd.org.uk". freebmd.org.uk. 31 December 2015. Retrieved 1 January 2016.CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)

Further reading

Sporting positions
Preceded by
Ron Ackland
1977-1978
Coach
Flag of New Zealand.svg
New Zealand

1979-1982
Succeeded by
Graham Lowe
1983-1986
Preceded by
Joe Egan
1970-1972
Coach
Blackpoolcolours.svg
Blackpool Borough

1972-1973
Succeeded by
Albert Fearnley
1978-1979
Preceded by
Chris Brockbank
1936-1951
Coach
Wolvescolours.svg
Warrington

1952-1961
Succeeded by
Ernie Ashcroft
1961-1967