Holstein Kiel

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Holstein Kiel
Holstein Kiel Logo.svg
Full nameKieler Sportvereinigung
Holstein von 1900 e.V.
Nickname(s)Die Störche (The Storks)[ citation needed ]
Founded7 October 1900;123 years ago (1900-10-07)
Ground Holstein-Stadion
Capacity15,034[ citation needed ]
Executive directorWolfgang Schwenke[ citation needed ]
PresidentSteffen Schneekloth[ citation needed ]
Head coach Marcel Rapp
League 2. Bundesliga
2022–23 2. Bundesliga, 8th of 18
Website Club website
Soccerball current event.svg Current season

Kieler Sportvereinigung Holstein von 1900 e.V., simply as KSV Holstein or Kieler SV Holstein, commonly known as Holstein Kiel (German pronunciation: [ˌhɔlʃtaɪnˈkiːl] ), is a German association football and sports club based in the city of Kiel, Schleswig-Holstein. From the 1900s through the 1960s, the club was one of the most dominant sides in northern Germany. Holstein appeared regularly in the national playoffs, winning their most important title, the German football championship in 1912, and finishing as vice-champions in 1910 and 1930. Holstein also won six regional titles and finished as runners-up another nine times. They remained a first-division side until the formation of the Bundesliga in 1963.

Contents

History

Foundation to WWII

Holstein Kiel is the product of the merger of predecessor sides Kieler Fußball-Verein von 1900 and Kieler Fußball-Club Holstein. The earliest of these two sides was Kieler Fußball-Verein (later 1. KFV) established on 7 October 1900 out of the membership of the gymnastics club Kieler Männerturnvereins von 1844. Later the club concentrated on track and field athletics.

Kieler Fußball-Club Holstein was formed on 4 May 1902 and was renamed Fußball-Verein Holstein von 1902 (FV Holstein Kiel) sometime in 1908. [1] The club quickly became competitive and, in 1910, they reached the German championship final, where they lost 0–1 in extra time to Karlsruher FV. In 1912, they wond the German championship with a 2–1 overtime semi-final victory over defending champions Viktoria 89 Berlin followed by a 1–0 win in the final over the previous year's champions, Karlsruher FV. [2] In 1914, the club renamed again after the new branches of hockey and athletics were added, becoming Sportverein Holstein von 1902.

On 7 June 1917, 1. Kieler Fussball Verein von 1900 and Sportverein Holstein von 1902, severely weakened by World War I, merged to form the current day club. The new association adopted the foundation date of the older club, while taking up the ground, kit, colours, logo and the name Holstein from SV Holstein Kiel.[ citation needed ] Through the 1920s, the team made regular appearances in the national playoffs and in 1926 reached the semi-finals where they were eliminated 1–3 by SpVgg Greuther Fürth.[ citation needed ] In 1930, they played their way to the final, losing 4–5 to Hertha BSC.[ citation needed ] The following year they reached the semi-finals where they were eliminated 0–2 by TSV 1860 Munich.

Under the Third Reich, German football was re-organized into sixteen top flight divisions. Kiel played in the Gauliga Nordmark, but failed to attain a title. In 1942, the Gauliga Nordmark was broken up into the Gauliga Hamburg and Gauliga Schleswig-Holstein.[ citation needed ] No longer in the company of Hamburger SV and other strong teams from the city, Kiel immediately won the title of the new division and defended it over the next two seasons until the end of World War II brought play to a halt across the country.

Those titles earned Kiel entry into the national playoff rounds. They made their best run in 1943 when they advanced as far as the semi-finals before losing to eventual champions Dresdner SC. The team secured third place by defeating FC Vienna Wien. The next year, they were eliminated early on and no final was played in 1945.

Postwar to present

Historical chart of Holstein Kiel league performance Holstein Kiel Performance Chart.png
Historical chart of Holstein Kiel league performance
Aerial view of the Holstein-Stadion (2019) Holstein-Stadion Luftbild 2019.jpg
Aerial view of the Holstein-Stadion (2019)

Since the end of the war, Kiel has primarily been a tier II and III club. After the conflict, football in the western half of the country was re-organized into five regional top flight divisions. Holstein Kiel played from 1947 until 1963 in the Oberliga Nord (I) and twice finished as runners-up (1953, 1957). In 1961 the reserve team won the German amateur championship. After the 1963 formation of a single national first division known as the Bundesliga, the club became a second division side and played in the Regionalliga Nord (II). Kiel did not advance to the Bundesliga after its 1965 Regionalliga Nord championship. German football was restructured in 1974 with the formation of a new second division known as the 2. Bundesliga and the team slipped to third division play in the Amateuroberliga Nord (III). Holstein Kiel won promotion to second-tier competition in 1978 as part of the 2. Bundesliga Nord and was relegated in 1981.

With the reunification of Germany in 1990 teams from the former East Germany became part of a combined national competition. German football was re-organized again in 1994 and Holstein Kiel qualified for the new tier three division Regionalliga Nord (III). In 1996, the club was relegated for the first time to the Oberliga Hamburg/Schleswig-Holstein (IV) and returned to Regionalliga Nord (III) in 1998. They were[ vague ] relegated again to the Oberliga Hamburg/Schleswig-Holstein (IV) after failing to qualify for the restructured Regionalliga (III), which went from four divisions to two. They did advance the next year and narrowly missed promotion to the 2. Bundesliga in the 2005–06 season. By 2007, they had slipped to the Oberliga Nord (IV), but earned two consecutive promotions to reach the new 3. Liga (III) in 2009. After one year in the third division, the club were relegated again in the Regionalliga Nord (IV). The team reached the quarter-finals of the 2011–12 DFB-Pokal, after beating FC Energie Cottbus, MSV Duisburg and 1. FSV Mainz 05. In the quarter-final they lost to Borussia Dortmund 4–0. Since 2013, the club played again in the third division, and, in 2017, they were promoted after 36 years to the second division. In the 2017–18 2. Bundesliga, after Holstein Kiel finished in 3rd place as the highest-scoring team with 71 goals, they lost 4–1 on aggregate to Wolfsburg in the relegation play-offs. In 2019, the club entered an official partnership with American USL League Two club San Francisco Glens SC. The team reached the semi-finals of the 2020–21 DFB-Pokal after beating Bayern Munich in the second round.

In the 2020–21 2. Bundesliga, Holstein Kiel missed the chance of direct promotion to the Bundesliga by losing the last two matches in the league by the same score 3–2 against Karlsruher SC and SV Darmstadt 98, to finish in third place behind VfL Bochum and Greuther Fürth. In the promotion play-offs, they won the first leg away 1–0 against FC Köln, but lost the second leg at home 5–1 to miss another chance of promotion. [3]

Honours

Viktoria trophy awarded to the German champions from 1903 to 1944 Victoria Schalke-Museum.jpg
Viktoria trophy awarded to the German champions from 1903 to 1944

National titles

Regional

Reserve team

order: (league/achievement/tier/year)

Recent seasons

The recent season-by-season performance of the club: [4] [5]

Key
Promoted Relegated

League history

Since 1947

Players

Current squad

As of 24 January 2024 [6]

Note: Flags indicate national team as defined under FIFA eligibility rules. Players may hold more than one non-FIFA nationality.

No.Pos.NationPlayer
1 GK Flag of Germany.svg  GER Timon Weiner
2 DF Flag of Denmark.svg  DEN Mikkel Kirkeskov
3 DF Flag of Germany.svg  GER Marco Komenda
4 DF Flag of Germany.svg  GER Patrick Erras
5 DF Flag of Sweden.svg  SWE Carl Johansson
6 MF Flag of Serbia.svg  SRB Marko Ivezić
7 MF Flag of Germany.svg  GER Steven Skrzybski
8 FW Flag of Germany.svg  GER Finn Porath
9 FW Flag of Austria.svg  AUT Benedikt Pichler
10 MF Flag of Germany.svg  GER Lewis Holtby
11 FW Flag of Sweden.svg  SWE Alexander Bernhardsson
13 FW Flag of Japan.svg  JPN Shuto Machino
15 MF Flag of Germany.svg  GER Marvin Schulz
16 MF Flag of Germany.svg  GER Philipp Sander (captain)
17 DF Flag of Germany.svg  GER Timo Becker
No.Pos.NationPlayer
18 DF Flag of Germany.svg  GER Tom Rothe (on loan from Borussia Dortmund)
19 FW Flag of Iceland.svg  ISL Hólmbert Friðjónsson
20 FW Flag of Germany.svg  GER Fiete Arp
21 GK Flag of Germany.svg  GER Thomas Dähne
22 MF Flag of Germany.svg  GER Nicolai Remberg
23 DF Flag of Germany.svg  GER Lasse Rosenboom
26 MF Flag of Germany.svg  GER Lucas Wolf
27 FW Flag of Germany.svg  GER Joshua Mees
28 MF Flag of Germany.svg  GER Aurel Wagbe
29 MF Flag of Germany.svg  GER Niklas Niehoff
31 GK Flag of Germany.svg  GER Marcel Engelhardt
32 MF Flag of Germany.svg  GER Jonas Sterner
34 DF Flag of Germany.svg  GER Colin Kleine-Bekel
38 DF Flag of the United States.svg  USA Nico Carrera

Out on loan

Note: Flags indicate national team as defined under FIFA eligibility rules. Players may hold more than one non-FIFA nationality.

No.Pos.NationPlayer
FW Flag of Ghana.svg  GHA Kwasi Okyere Wriedt (at VfL Osnabrück until 30 June 2024)
No.Pos.NationPlayer
FW Flag of Germany.svg  GER Ba-Muaka Simakala (at 1. FC Kaiserslautern until 30 June 2024)

Notable famous or former players

Germany
International

Germany international footballers

Players which achieve during their active years at Holstein Kiel to become Germany international footballers. In parentheses (games / goals/ years).[ citation needed ]

Coaching staff

PositionName
Head Coach Marcel Rapp
Assistant Head Coach Dirk Bremser
Assistant CoachAlexander Hahn
Goalkeeper Coach Patrik Borger
Niklas Jakusch
Fitness CoachTimm Sörensen
Athletic CoachLasse Bork
Match AnalystAlexander Rudies
Team DoctorAndre Hönig
Dr. Marco Diekmann
Head of PhysiotherapyTim Höper
PhysiotherapistTimm Pflügler
Tim Rosenthal
Sebastian Süß
Timo Syroka
Lennart Schlegel
Organizational LeaderJan Uphues
Team ManagerSebastian Ermuth-von Petersdorff
Bus DriverTim Petersen
Tim Brockmüller

Women's section

Since July 2004, the club has a women's football section as Wittenseer SV-TUS Felde dissolved their club to join Holstein Kiel.[ citation needed ] The team play since 2005–06 in the 2. Bundesliga.[ clarification needed ][ citation needed ] 2011 the team were relegated to the third division.

Recent seasons

YearDivisionPosition
2004–05 Regionalliga Nord (III)1st (promoted)
2005–06 2. Bundesliga (II)6th
2006–07 2. Bundesliga (II)7th
2007–08 2. Bundesliga (II)6th
2008–09 2. Bundesliga (II)7th
2009–10 2. Bundesliga (II)10th
2010–11 2. Bundesliga (II)12th (relegated)
2011–12Regionalliga Nord (III)1st (promoted)
2012–13 2. Bundesliga (II)11th (relegated)
2013–14Regionalliga Nord (III)1st (promoted)
2014–15 2. Bundesliga (II)10th
2015–16 2. Bundesliga (II)12th (relegated)
2016–17 Regionalliga Nord (III)4th
2017–18Regionalliga Nord (III)5th
2018–19Regionalliga Nord (III)4th
2019–20Regionalliga Nord (III)4th
2020–21Regionalliga Nord (III)

Other departments

Other departments are team handball (men and women), tennis, and cheerleading.[ citation needed ] The women's handball team won the 1971 German handball championship.

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References

  1. Grüne, Hardy (2001)Vereinslexikon. Kassel: AGON Sportverlag ISBN   3-89784-147-9
  2. Grüne, Hardy (1996). Vom Kronprinzen bis zur Bundesliga. Kassel: AGON Sportverlag ISBN   3-928562-85-1
  3. "Relegation 2021: 1. FC Köln mit Schützenfest zum Klassenerhalt – Das Spiel in der TICKER-Nachlese". Goal (website) (in German). 29 May 2021. Archived from the original on 29 May 2021. Retrieved 29 May 2021.
  4. "Das deutsche Fußball-Archiv" (in German). f-archiv.de. Archived from the original on 22 February 2018. Retrieved 14 March 2015.
  5. "Ergebnisse" (in German). Fussball.de. Archived from the original on 23 September 2018. Retrieved 14 March 2015.
  6. "Kader – Kieler Sportvereinigung Holstein von 1900 e. V." Archived from the original on 5 August 2019. Retrieved 12 September 2019.
  7. scored the lone goal in 1912's championship match.[ citation needed ]
  8. record goalkeeper after WW2 with 271 appearances[ citation needed ]
  9. record for the most matches after WW2 with 368 appearances[ citation needed ]
  10. record goalscorer after WW2 with 141 goals[ citation needed ]

54°20′55″N10°07′27″E / 54.34861°N 10.12417°E / 54.34861; 10.12417