King's African Rifles Long Service and Good Conduct Medal

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King's African Rifles Long Service and Good Conduct Medal
RWAFF and KAR Long Service and Good Conduct Medal.png
Ribbon of the medal
Awarded forLong service
DescriptionCircular silver medal
Presented bythe United Kingdom
EligibilityMembers of the King's African Rifles
Post-nominalsNone
StatusNo longer awarded
Established1907
Last awardedEarly 1960s

The King's African Rifles Long Service and Good Conduct Medal was approved in March 1907 [1] to recognise long service and good conduct by native African NCOs and men of the King's African Rifles (KAR). [2]

Initially, the period of qualifying service to be eligible for the medal was 18 years, but in March 1933 it was reduced to 16 years. [3] Awards were discontinued in the early 1960s, as each of Britain's East African colonies received independence, with KAR units redesignated or disbanded. [4]

It is a 36mm wide circular silver medal bearing the effigy of the reigning monarch on the obverse. The reverse is inscribed 'FOR LONG SERVICE AND GOOD CONDUCT' over four lines with, around the top circumference of the medal, the words 'KING'S AFRICAN RIFLES'. The 32mm wide ribbon is crimson with a central green stripe, the same as for the Royal West African Frontier Force Long Service and Good Conduct Medal. [2]

The medal was worn in uniform after campaign and royal commemorative medals. [5]

See also

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References

  1. Duckers, Peter (2013). British Military Medals: A Guide for the Collector and Family Historian (2nd ed.). Barnsley, UK: Pen and Sword. Chapter 14. ISBN   978-1-47382-983-1.
  2. 1 2 John Mussell (ed). (2014). Medal Yearbook 2015. p. 245. Token Publishing Ltd. Honiton, Devon. ISBN   9781908828163.
  3. Moyse-Bartlett, H. (2012). The King's African Rifles: A Study in the Military History of East and Central Africa, 1890–1945, Volume 2. Luton: Andrews UK. p. 699, Appendix C. ISBN   978-1-78150-663-9.
  4. Page, Malcolm (2011). King's African Rifles: A History. Barnsley, UK: Pen and Sword Books. Chapter 12: Imperial Twilight. ISBN   978-1848844384.
  5. "No. 34277". The London Gazette . 24 April 1936. p. 2622.