List of Sailor Moon video games

Last updated

The Sailor Moon video game series is based on Naoko Takeuchi's manga and anime series of the same name. The series was released in Japan during the height of the media franchise's popularity. By 1995, there were ten game releases, each with sales figures of about 200,000 to 300,000. [1] By 1998, twenty games were released. [2]

Contents

Nintendo systems

TitleDetails
Bishoujo Senshi Sailor Moon

Original release date(s): [3]
  • JP: December 18, 1992
Release years by system:
1992—Game Boy [3]
Notes:
Bishoujo Senshi Sailor Moon R

Original release date(s): [4]
  • JP: April 22, 1994
Release years by system:
1994—Game Boy [4]
Notes:
  • Action video game, developed and published by Angel. [4]

Original release date(s): [5]
  • JP: August 27, 1993
  • EU: December 31, 1994
Release years by system:
1993—Super Nintendo Entertainment System [5]
Notes:
  • Beat 'em up video game, developed by Angel in 1993, and ported to the Super Nintendo Entertainment System. It was localized in Europe exclusively in French in 1994.
  • A version for the Sega Mega Drive (known as the Genesis in North America) was developed and published by Ma-Ba, although certain elements were recycled from the Super NES version.
  • The game is set in the first series of Sailor Moon, and the players take control of one or two of the five heroines. Each Sailor Soldier has some sequences of blows, three aerial attacks (neutral, moving forward/backward, downward) and a special charge-up projectile. The enemies are the monsters of the Dark Kingdom that appeared in the anime, but if more than one of the same kind appears at once, the others use palette swaps.
  • The Mega Drive version features most of the stages from the Super NES version but a few were removed and replaced. Some of the boss battles are different as well, and a new hidden final boss, Queen Metaria is featured when playing on Hard Mode. The Mega Drive counterpart does not contain any of the music from the Super NES game, with the exception of the main theme song at the title screen. Bosses also has their own song rather than a generic theme for all of them. The game has different endings for each playable character.

Original release date(s): [6]
  • JP: December 29, 1993
Release years by system:
1993—Super Nintendo Entertainment System [6]
Notes:
  • Sequel to the first Sailor Moon Super NES video game.
  • Introduced a new playable character, Chibiusa. The sprites from the previous game were redesigned with more detail and more animation frames for this game and the later games.
  • Like the Mega Drive version of the previous game, the bosses have their own theme music. By playing the game on hard mode, there is a minor change to the ending that involves Sailor Pluto. Monsters in this game were all droids. Like the previous game, there are several different shades of them. One of the other differences from the first game is the special attack that destroys all on-screen enemies.
Bishoujo Senshi Sailor Moon S: Kondo wa Puzzle de Oshiokiyo!

Original release date(s): [7]
  • JP: July 15, 1994
Release years by system:
1994—Super Nintendo Entertainment System [7]
Notes:

Original release date(s): [8]
  • JP: December 16, 1994
Release years by system:
1994—Super Nintendo Entertainment System [8]
Notes:
  • Fighting game developed by Arc System Works and published by Angel.
  • The game features three game modes: a single-player plot-based Story mode, as well as a Tournament mode and 2-Player Versus mode where all the Sailor Guardians are able to be selected including the Outer Guardians (except Sailor Saturn).
  • The game has developed an active competitive scene - most notably in North America, making appearances in tournaments such as the Evolution Championship Series.
Bishoujo Senshi Sailor Moon S Kurukkurin

Original release date(s): [9]
  • JP: February 24, 1995
Release years by system:
1995—Super Nintendo Entertainment System [9]
Notes:
  • Puzzle video game, developed by Tom Create and published by Bandai. [9]

Original release date(s): [10]
  • JP: September 22, 1995
Release years by system:
1995—Super Nintendo Entertainment System [10]
Notes:
  • Role-playing video game developed and published by Angel. [10]
  • The game is set between the third and fourth story arcs and combines original elements with elements from both the anime and manga. [11]
Bishoujo Senshi Sailor Moon SuperS: Fuwa Fuwa Panic

Original release date(s): [12]
  • JP: December 8, 1995
Release years by system:
1995—Super Nintendo Entertainment System [12]
Notes:
  • Puzzle video game, developed by Tom Create and published by Bandai. [12]
Bishoujo Senshi Sailor Moon SuperS: Zenin Sanka! Shuyaku Soudatsusen

Original release date(s): [13]
  • JP: March 29, 1996
Release years by system:
1996—Super Nintendo Entertainment System [13]
Notes:
  • Fighting 2D game, developed by Monolith and published by Angel. [13]
  • In story mode, Sailors Moon, Chibi Moon and the Inner Guardians are available. In two players mode (versus other player or versus computer) all ten Guardians could be selected. Tournament and training modes are also present.
Bishoujo Senshi Sailor Moon Sailor Stars: Fuwa Fuwa Panic 2

Original release date(s): [14]
  • JP: September 27, 1996
Release years by system:
1996—Super Nintendo Entertainment System [14]
Notes:
  • Puzzle video game, developed and published by Bandai. [14]

Original release date(s): [15]
  • ITA: March 16, 2011
Release years by system:
2011—Nintendo DS [15]
Notes:

Sega systems

TitleDetails

Original release date(s): [16]
  • JP: July 8, 1994
Release years by system:
1994—Sega Genesis [16]
Notes:
  • Beat 'em up game developed by Arc System Works and TNS and published by Ma-Ba. [16]
Bishoujo Senshi Sailor Moon S

Original release date(s): [17]
  • JP: January 27, 1995
Release years by system:
1995—Game Gear [17]
Notes:
  • Fighting 2D game, developed by Shimada Kikaku and published by Bandai. [17]

Original release date(s): [18]
  • JP: November 29, 1996
Release years by system:
1996—Sega Saturn [18]
Notes:
  • Fighting 2D game, developed and published by Angel. [18]
Bishoujo Senshi Sailor Moon S

Original release date(s):[ citation needed ]
Release years by system:
1994—Sega Pico
Notes:
    Bishoujo Senshi Sailor Moon SuperS

    Original release date(s):[ citation needed ]
    Release years by system:
    1995—Sega Pico
    Notes:
      Bishoujo Senshi Sailor Moon Sailor Stars

      Original release date(s):[ citation needed ]
      Release years by system:
      1996—Sega Pico
      Notes:

        PlayStation

        TitleDetails

        Original release date(s): [19]
        • JP: March 8, 1996
        Release years by system:
        1996—PlayStation [19]
        Notes:
        • Fighting 2D game, published by Angel. [19]
        • All ten Soldiers are playable in two player mode. However, in story mode, players can only choose from the six main Soldiers. All six major Soldiers now have four specials techniques, three power attacks, and their new power from the show. The four other Soldiers only have three powers available to them.
        • Players can also customize characters, by assigning up to 20 points to increase the attributes of each of the characters. The game offers four levels of difficulty, ranging from Easy to Hardest.
        Kids Station: Bishoujo Senshi Sailor Moon World - Chibiusa to Tanoshii Mainichi

        Original release date(s): [20]
        • JP: November 29, 2001
        Release years by system:
        2001—PlayStation [20]
        Notes:
        • Miscellaneous game, developed and published by Bandai. [20]

        Playdia

        TitleDetails
        Bishoujo Senshi Sailor Moon S: Quiz Taiketsu! Sailor Power Ketsushuu

        Original release date(s): [21]
        • JP: September 23, 1994
        Release years by system:
        1994—Playdia [21]
        Notes:
        • Trivia/Game Show video game, developed and published by Bandai. [21]
        Bishoujo Senshi Sailor Moon SuperS: Sailor Moon to Hiragana Lesson!

        Original release date(s): [22]
        • JP: July 28, 1995
        Release years by system:
        1995—Playdia [22]
        Notes:
        • Miscellaneous game, developed and published by Bandai. [22]
        Bishoujo Senshi Sailor Moon SuperS: Youkoso! Sailor Youchien

        Original release date(s): [23]
        • JP: August 24, 1995
        Release years by system:
        1995—Playdia [23]
        Notes:
        • Miscellaneous game, developed and published by Bandai. [23]
        Bishoujo Senshi Sailor Moon SuperS: Sailor Moon to Hajimete no Eigo

        Original release date(s): [24]
        • JP: August 24, 1995
        Release years by system:
        1995—Playdia [24]
        Notes:
        • Miscellaneous game, developed and published by Bandai. [24]

        Other systems

        TitleDetails
        Bishoujo Senshi Sailor Moon: Kessen Dark Kingdom

        Original release date(s): [25]
        • JP: March 17, 1993
        Release years by system:
        1993—Sharp X68000 [25]
        Notes:
        Bishoujo Senshi Sailor V

        Original release date(s): [26]
        Release years by system:
        1994—Sharp X68000 [26]
        Notes:
        Bishoujo Senshi Sailor Moon

        Original release date(s): [27]
        • JP: August 5, 1994
        Release years by system:
        1994—Turbo CD [27]
        Notes:
        • Visual novel video game, developed and published by Banpresto. [27]
        Bishoujo Senshi Sailor Moon S: Kotaete Moon Call!

        Original release date(s): [28]
        • JP: September 26, 1994
        Release years by system:
        1994—Terebikko [28]
        Notes:
        • Trivia video game, developed and published by Bandai. [28]
        Bishoujo Senshi Sailor Moon Collection

        Original release date(s): [29]
        • JP: November 25, 1994
        Release years by system:
        1994—Turbo CD [29]
        Notes:
        • Miscellaneous game, developed by TamTam and published by Banpresto. [29]

        Original release date(s): [30]
        • JP: March 17, 1995
        Release years by system:
        1995—3DO Interactive Multiplayer [30]
        Notes:
        • Fighting 2D game, developed by Tose and published by Bandai. [30]
        • It features nine Sailor Guardians (Sailor Saturn is not present).
        • Each Soldier has a set of special attacks. Virtual camera is zooming during battle, approaching the fighters and retreating from them. Opening intro combines sprite and 3D animation.

        Original release date(s): [31]
        • WW: March 22, 1995
        Release years by system:
        1995—Arcade game [32]
        Notes:
        Quiz Bishoujo Senshi Sailor Moon: Chiryoku Tairyoku Toki no Un

        Original release date(s): [34]
        Release years by system:
        1997—Arcade game [34]
        Notes:
        • Trivia/Game Show video game, developed by Gazelle and published by Banpresto. [34]
        The 3D Adventures of Sailor Moon

        Original release date(s): [35]
        Release years by system:
        1997—PC [35]
        Notes:
        • Miscellaneous game, developed and published by 3VR New Media. [35]
        Sailor Moon Horoskop & Games

        Original release date(s): [36]
        • EU: March 31, 2000
        Release years by system:
        2000—PC [36]
        Notes:

        Mobile

        TitleDetails
        Bishoujo Senshi Sailor Dash

        Original release date(s): [37]
        • JP: October 5, 2014
        Release years by system:
        2014—iPhone, [37] Android [38]
        Notes:
        • Unofficial, fan-made game. [38]
        Silver Crystal for Sailor V

        Original release date(s):
        • JP: November 24, 2014
        Release years by system:
        2014— iPhone, Android
        Notes:

        Original release date(s): [39]
        • JP: April 12, 2016
        Release years by system:
        2016—iPhone, Android [39]
        Notes:
        • Match-3 puzzler developed by Beeline Interactive Japan, Inc. and published by Bandai Namco Games. [40]
        • Bandai discontinued the game on March 28, 2019. The company issued an announcement several months before. [41] This prompted fans to issue a petition on Change.org, asking Bandai not to cancel the game. [42]

        Other games featuring Sailor Moon characters

        TitleDetails
        Nakayoshi to Issho

        Original release date(s): [43]
        • JP: December 10, 1993
        Release years by system:
        1993—Super Nintendo Entertainment System [43]
        Notes:
        Welcome Nakayoshi Park

        Original release date(s): [44]
        • JP: March 3, 1994
        Release years by system:
        1994—Game Boy [44]
        Notes:
        • Miscellaneous game, developed by Tom Create and published by Bandai. [44]
        • It features Sailor Moon, Tuxedo Mask, and Luna & Artemis.

        Original release date(s): [45]
        • JP: November 18, 1994
        Release years by system:
        1994—Super Nintendo Entertainment System [46]
        Notes:
        • Action video game, developed by Tom Create and published by Bandai. [45]
        • Sailor Moon and Sailor Chibi Moon are playable characters.
        Tanoshiku Asonde Nouryoku Up! Tanoshii Youchien '95-nendoban

        Original release date(s): [47]
        • JP: April 3, 1995
        Release years by system:
        1995—Sega Pico
        Notes:
        • "Edutainment" video game featuring Sailor Moon and Sailor Chibi Moon, as well as characters from other franchises such as Power Rangers .

        Original release date(s):
        • JP: April 24, 2013
        Release years by system:
        2013—iOS, Android, Kindle Fire
        Notes:
        • This video game featured two events as part of the Sailor Moon franchise: Moon Medal Festival, from March 18 to 24, 2019 and Lost Child's Firefly Festival, from March 13 to 22, 2020. [48]

        Original release date(s): [49]
        • JP: March 18, 2017
        Release years by system:
        2017—Nintendo 3DS [49]
        Notes:
        • This is collaboration with Capcom as part of the 25th anniversary celebration of the Sailor Moon franchise. The Felyne cat companion resembles Luna and wields Sailor Moon's Cutie Moon Rod weapon. [50]

        Related Research Articles

        Naoko Togashi, known by her maiden name Naoko Takeuchi, is a Japanese manga artist. She is best known as the author of Sailor Moon, one of the most popular manga series of all time.

        <i>Sailor Moon</i> Manga series by Naoko Takeuchi

        Sailor Moon is a Japanese shōjo manga series written and illustrated by Naoko Takeuchi. It was originally serialized in Nakayoshi from 1991 to 1997; the 60 individual chapters were published in 18 tankōbon volumes. The series follows the adventures of a schoolgirl named Usagi Tsukino as she transforms into Sailor Moon to search for a magical artifact, the "Legendary Silver Crystal". She leads a group of comrades, the Sailor Soldiers as they battle against villains to prevent the theft of the Silver Crystal and the destruction of the Solar System.

        Sailor Saturn Character in Sailor Moon

        Sailor Saturn is a fictional lead character in Naoko Takeuchi's Sailor Moon media franchise. Her spirit is housed within Hotaru Tomoe, who closely resembles her. Sailor Saturn is a member of the Sailor Guardians of the Moon Kingdom during the Silver Millennium eras, supernatural reincarnations of planets and stars who protect the Solar System from evil. Sailor Saturn is the tenth and last of the Sailor Guardians to be discovered, possessing powers associated with silence and ruin, nothingness, destruction, death, and rebirth that made her a potential threat as she can wipe out a planet and even an entire galaxy or reset its evolution.

        Sailor Uranus Fictional character in Sailor Moon

        Sailor Uranus is a fictional lead character in the Sailor Moon media franchise. Sailor Uranus’ alternate identity is Haruka Tenoh, a teenage Japanese student. Haruka is a member of the Sailor Soldiers, supernatural fighters who protect the Solar System from evil.

        Sailor Neptune Character from Sailor Moon

        Sailor Neptune is a fictional lead character in the Sailor Moon media franchise. The alternate identity of Michiru Kaioh, a teenage Japanese schoolgirl. Michiru is a member of the Sailor Soldiers, female supernatural fighters who protect the Solar System from evil.

        <i>Sailor Moon SuperS</i> Fourth season of the Sailor Moon anime series

        The fourth season of the Sailor Moon anime series, titled Pretty Soldier Sailor Moon SuperS was produced by Toei Animation and directed by Kunihiko Ikuhara. It adapts the "Dream" arc of the Sailor Moon manga series by Naoko Takeuchi and follows the adventures of Usagi Tsukino and her fellow Super Sailor Guardians. The series is divided into two story arcs: the first arc for 22 episodes depicts a mighty deity known as Pegasus, entering Chibiusa's dreams to flee from the Amazon Trio, minions of the Dead Moon Circus, who are trying to steal the legendary Golden Crystal from him. The second arc for 17 episodes depicts the arrival of the Amazoness Quartet, a group of enemies who dream of remaining young forever, as well as Queen Nehelenia, the depraved ruler of the Dead Moon Circus.

        Anza (singer) Japanese singer and actress

        Anza Ohyama, also known as simply Anza, is a Japanese singer and theater actress best known as vocalist of the heavy metal band Head Phones President and for playing Sailor Moon in thirteen separate musical productions.

        <i>Sailor Moon Sailor Stars</i> Fifth and last season of the Sailor Moon anime series

        The fifth and final season of the Sailor Moon anime series, titled Pretty Soldier Sailor Moon: Sailor Stars, was directed by Takuya Igarashi and produced by Toei Animation. Like the rest of the Sailor Moon series, it follows the adventures of Usagi Tsukino and her fellow Sailor Guardians. The series is divided into two story arcs. The first 6 episodes consist of a self-contained arc in which the Sailor Guardians encounter Queen Nehelenia again. The remaining 28 episodes adapt material from the "Stars" act of the Sailor Moon manga series by Naoko Takeuchi, in which the Sailor Guardians meet up with the Sailor Starlights, led by Princess Kakyuu. They discover that Sailor Galaxia, the leader of the "Shadow Galactica" organization and a corrupted Sailor Guardian, plans to increase her powers and rule the Milky Way.

        <i>Sailor Moon R</i> Second season of the Sailor Moon anime series

        The second season of the Sailor Moon anime series, titled Pretty Soldier Sailor Moon R, was produced by Toei Animation and directed by Junichi Sato and Kunihiko Ikuhara. According to the booklet from the Sailor Moon Memorial Song Box, the letter "R" stands for the word "Romance", "Return" or "Rose".

        <i>Sailor Moon</i> (season 1) First season of the Sailor Moon anime series

        The first season of the Sailor Moon anime series was produced by Toei Animation and directed by Junichi Sato. It was broadcast from March 7, 1992 to February 27, 1993 on TV Asahi. This season adapts the first arc of the Sailor Moon manga series by Naoko Takeuchi, the "Dark Kingdom" arc.

        <i>Sailor Moon S</i> Third season of the Sailor Moon anime series

        The third season of the Sailor Moon anime series, titled Pretty Soldier Sailor Moon S, was produced by Toei Animation and directed by Kunihiko Ikuhara. It began broadcasting on TV Asahi on March 19, 1994, and ended on February 25, 1995. It adapts the "Infinity" arc of the Sailor Moon manga series by Naoko Takeuchi, and follows the adventures of Usagi Tsukino and her fellow Sailor Guardians. In this season, they must fight against the Death Busters, who are planning to take over Earth. In 2000, Cloverway Inc. licensed the season for an English-language broadcast in North America. Optimum Productions dubbed the season, continuing over from the first two seasons that were licensed by DIC Entertainment. The series aired on YTV in Canada, who adjusted the episode numbers to match those of the original Japanese version, from June 12, 2000 to August 1, 2000. The season later aired on Cartoon Network's Toonami programming block in the United States. Edited and unedited VHS tapes and uncut bilingual DVDs of their adaptation were released by Pioneer Entertainment. In contrast to DIC's handling of the first two seasons, Cloverway retained the background music and sound effects from the original Japanese version. Eventually, the season was re-licensed by Viz Media in 2014 for an updated English-language release, produced by Studiopolis. The first 18 episodes of the season were released as Part 1 on November 15, 2016, and the remaining 18 episodes were released as Part 2 on June 20, 2017. While Sailor Moon S began very similarly to the first two seasons, it eventually took a darker, more emotional turn.

        <i>Bishōjo Senshi Sailor Moon: Another Story</i> Sailor Moon video game released in 1995

        Bishōjo Senshi Sailor Moon: Another Story is a role-playing video game developed and published by Angel exclusively for the Super Famicom in Japan on 22 September 1995. Based upon Naoko Takeuchi's Sailor Moon shōjo manga and anime series, the game takes place between the third season and fourth season of the anime series, which adapted the third and fourth arcs of the manga respectively, as players take control of either the five Inner Guardians or the four Outer Guardians in order to protect Crystal Tokyo by fighting against a group of rebels and several of their previously defeated enemies once again that were resurrected by the sorceress Apsu.

        Chibiusa Character in the Sailor Moon franchise

        Chibiusa is a fictional character from the Sailor Moon manga series created by Naoko Takeuchi. She is one of the main characters of the series. She is introduced in Chapter 13, "Conclusion and Commencement, Petite Étrangere", first published in Nakayoshi on February 3, 1993. She is a small child from the 30th century who travels to the past to seek help from the Sailor Soldiers. She later returns, a few years older, in order to train as a Soldier herself—Sailor Chibi Moon, translated as "Sailor Mini Moon" in the DIC and Cloverway English adaptations.

        Sailor Jupiter Character from Sailor Moon

        Makoto Kino, better known as Sailor Jupiter, is a fictional character in the Sailor Moon manga series created by Naoko Takeuchi. Makoto is her sailor form's alternative human identity as part of the Sailor Soldiers, female supernatural fighters who protect the Solar System from evil.

        <i>Pretty Soldier Sailor Moon S</i> (3DO game) 1995 Sailor Moon video game

        Pretty Soldier Sailor Moon S is a fighting game developed by Tose and published by Bandai exclusively for the 3DO Interactive Multiplayer in Japan on 17 March 1995. It is based upon Naoko Takeuchi's Sailor Moon shōjo manga and anime series, though its gameplay has been compared with other titles in the same genre such as SNK's Samurai Shodown. Loosely following the third season of the anime series, which adapted the third arc of the manga, the players control either one of the five original Inner Senshi or one of the three Outer Senshi as they enter a tournament to fight against each other and become the winning victor. Takeuchi supervised the production of the project and seiyūs from the anime series returned to reprise their roles.

        <i>Pretty Soldier Sailor Moon</i> (arcade game) 1995 video game

        Pretty Soldier Sailor Moon is a side-scrolling beat 'em up arcade video game developed by Gazelle and released on March 22, 1995. It was published in Japan by Banpresto and elsewhere by Sega. It is the first game to be created by Gazelle, one of the offshoots of defunct developer Toaplan that were founded after they declared bankruptcy in 1994, and one of the few titles based upon Naoko Takeuchi's Sailor Moon shōjo manga and anime series that had an official international release, and it also has been compared with other titles in the same genre such as Capcom's Final Fight and Technōs Japan's Double Dragon.

        <i>Sailor Moon</i> (1993 video game)

        Sailor Moon is a side-scrolling beat 'em up video game originally developed and released by Angel in Japan on August 27, 1993 and later in France in 1994 by Bandai for the Super Nintendo Entertainment System. It is the second game to be created by Angel based upon Naoko Takeuchi's Sailor Moon shōjo manga and anime series, the first for the Super NES and one of the few Sailor Moon titles that had an official international release.

        <i>Bishōjo Senshi Sailor Moon R</i> (1993 video game)

        Bishōjo Senshi Sailor Moon R is a side-scrolling beat 'em up video game developed by Angel and published by Bandai in Japan on December 29, 1993. It is the third game to be created by Angel based upon Naoko Takeuchi's Sailor Moon shōjo manga and anime series, as well as the second title in the franchine for Super Famicom, serving as the sequel to Sailor Moon. Following the second season of the anime series, which adapted the second arc of the manga, the players control one of the six Sailor Guardians and fight against enemies across several locations in order to protect Earth from both the Hell Tree aliens led by Ail and Ann as well as the Black Moon Clan led by Prince Demand, who are attempting to steal life energy from humans and the Star Points of future Crystal Tokyo. Like its predecessor, the game was met with mixed reception from critics since its release.

        <i>Bishōjo Senshi Sailor Moon SuperS: Shin Shuyaku Sōdatsusen</i>

        Bishōjo Senshi Sailor Moon SuperS: Shin Shuyaku Sōdatsusen is a 1996 fighting video game developed and published by Angel for the PlayStation and Sega Saturn. It is based upon Naoko Takeuchi's Sailor Moon shōjo manga and anime series. Loosely following the fourth season of the anime series, which adapted the fourth arc of the manga, the players control either one of the five original Inner Senshi or one of the four Outer Senshi as they enter a tournament to fight against each other and become the winning victor. The game was created by most of the same team who worked on previously released fighting titles in the Sailor Moon franchise for the Super Famicom at Angel.

        <i>Bishōjo Senshi Sailor Moon S: Jōgai Rantō!? Shuyaku Sōdatsusen</i>

        Bishōjo Senshi Sailor Moon S: Jōgai Rantō!? Shuyaku Sōdatsusen is a 1994 fighting video game developed by Arc System Works and published by Angel for the Super Famicom. It is based upon Naoko Takeuchi's Sailor Moon manga and anime series and stars heroic teenage girls who represent the major celestial bodies of the solar system. The player takes control of one of the girls who have decided to stage a fighting tournament to determine who should lead the group.

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