Lower Sackville, Nova Scotia

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Lower Sackville
Community
Lower sackville.JPG
Aerial view of Lower Sackville
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Map of Sackville planning area in Halifax, Nova Scotia
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Lower Sackville
Location of Lower Sackville, Nova Scotia
Coordinates: 44°46′35″N63°41′44″W / 44.77639°N 63.69556°W / 44.77639; -63.69556 Coordinates: 44°46′35″N63°41′44″W / 44.77639°N 63.69556°W / 44.77639; -63.69556
CountryFlag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada
Province Nova Scotia
Municipality Halifax
CommunityLower Sackville
Municipal District District 15 (Lower Sackville)
Founded1749
Amalgamated with Halifax April 1, 1996
Area
[1]
  Total5.66 km2 (2.19 sq mi)
Time zone UTC-4 (AST)
  Summer (DST) UTC-3 (ADT)
Canadian Postal code
B4C, B4E, B4G
Area code(s) 782, 902
Telephone Exchange252, 864, 865, 869
Website www.lowersackville.com

Lower Sackville is a community within the urban area of Halifax Regional Municipality, in Nova Scotia, Canada.

Contents

History

Before the European colonization in 1749, the Mi'kmaq lived in this area for thousands of years.

In August 1749, Captain John Gorham, acting on orders from Governor Edward Cornwallis to establish a military fort named Fort Sackville. (The community was named after George Germain, 1st Viscount Sackville. [2] ). As the community grew, the oak trees that lined the main drive were cut down one-by-one due to poor urban planning. As more homes were desired, the farmlands made way for further urbanization.[ citation needed ]

In the 1950s and 1960s it was a destination for Haligonians seeking entertainment at the drive-in theater, a harness racing track (Sackville Downs), and a World War II bomber-plane ice cream place. Sackville Downs closed in 1986.

A result of its unincorporated status before 1996, Lower Sackville and adjacent unincorporated communities such as Middle Sackville and Upper Sackville did not benefit from appropriate planning and are examples of urban sprawl.[ citation needed ] The community's growth reflects its north-central location within the urban area, near the communities of Dartmouth and Halifax. Proximity to Bayers Lake Business Park, Burnside Business Park, and the Downtowns of Halifax give the community the advantages of employment-opportunities--and--services of a larger municipality, and is typical of most commuter communities experiencing growth in North America.

Before amalgamation into the Municipality of Halifax in 1996, Lower Sackville was an unincorporated part of Halifax County.

On 1 April 1996, Halifax County was dissolved and all of its places (cities, suburbs, towns, and villages) were turned into communities of a single-tier municipality named Halifax Regional Municipality. Subsequently, Lower Sackville was turned into a community within the new Municipality of Halifax.

Today, Lower Sackville is a thriving bedroom community of the Municipality of Halifax with many established businesses, parks, and places of interest.

Geography

According to the 2013 Halifax Regional Municipality Urban Forest Master Plan, the community of Lower Sackville covers approximately 566 ha (1,400 acres) of land area. [3]

Lower Sackville is east of Lucasville; north--north-east of Bedford; south-east of Middle Sackville; and south-west of Windsor Junction.

The community is located approximately 18 km (11 mi) from Downtown Dartmouth, approximately 27 km (17 mi) from Downtown Halifax, and approximately 25 km (16 mi) from Halifax Stanfield International Airport.

Districts of Lower Sackville

The following are the districts of Lower Sackville, their geographical location, and/or main road: [4]

Some neighbourhoods of Lower Sackville are also known by their tendency to use street names starting with the same letter:

Other streets are notable for having their namesakes the Fathers of Canadian Confederation: Brown, Cartier, Chandler, Chapais, Cockburn, Coles, Dickie, Haviland, Howland, Johnson, Langevin, MacDougall, McGee, Mowat, Nelson, Pope, Shea, Steeves, Tache, Tilley, Tilloch, and Wilmot.

Parks and Recreation

Arenas

Community Centres

Library

Museums

Parks

Pools

Trails

Demographics

The only demographic information that pertains to Lower Sackville is provided by Halifax Regional Council, and pertains to District 15 (Lower Sackville). District 15 (Lower Sackville) has 21,379 people living within its boundaries. [6] However, the community itself does not have any recent demographic information.

Economy

Lower Sackville has experienced ribbon/strip-style commercial development along Trunk 1 since the 1960s. Current retail chains include Canadian Tire, Cleve's Sporting Goods, Dollarama, Giant Tiger, Sobeys, and Atlantic Superstore. There are numerous independent restaurants-and-retailers located in this area as well. Most of the restaurants in the area are of the fast food variety, as well as other establishments that serve various cuisines.

Transportation

The community is north-centrally located within the urban area of Halifax. Highway 101, Highway 102, Route 354, and Trunk 1 (Sackville Drive within Lower Sackville) are highways that connect the community to the rest of the urban area, or beyond.

Lower Sackville is serviced by many transit routes via the Cobequid Terminal near the southern-part of the community, or the Sackville Terminal near the northern-part of the community. The transit-user can use various routes to arrive at another community within the urban area, or elsewhere. [7]

Halifax Transit Routes

Education

Lower Sackville has eight schools to choose from; four Elementary Schools, three Junior High Schools, and one High School. They are all administered by the Halifax Regional Centre for Education.

Elementary Schools

Junior High Schools

High Schools

Notable people

Related Research Articles

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References

  1. "Halifax Regional Municipality Urban Forest Master Plan" (PDF). halifax.ca. Government of the Municipality of Halifax. Retrieved 1 August 2021.
  2. "Nova Scotia Archives - Error". 20 April 2020.
  3. "Halifax Regional Municipality Urban Forest Master Plan" (PDF). halifax.ca. Government of the Municipality of Halifax. Retrieved 1 August 2021.
  4. "Archived copy" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 2016-11-12. Retrieved 2016-11-11.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  5. "Welcome to Fultz House". fultzhouse.ca. Fultz House Museum. Retrieved 5 August 2022.
  6. "Districts & Councillors". halifax.ca. Government of the Municipality of Halifax, Halifax Regional Council. Retrieved 6 August 2022.
  7. "Routes & Schedules". halifax.ca. Government of the Municipality of Halifax/Halifax Transit. Retrieved 6 August 2022.