MV Dali

Last updated

DALI (29715954007).jpg
Dali in the Port of Rotterdam in 2018
History
NameDali
Namesake Salvador Dalí [1]
Owner
  • Stellar Marine LLC (2015–2016) [2]
  • Grace Ocean Pte. Ltd. (2016–present) [3]
Operator
  • Maersk (charterer)
  • Oceanbulk Container Management (2015–2016) [2]
  • Synergy Marine Pte. Ltd. (2016–present) [2]
Port of registry
Ordered14 May 2013 [4]
Builder Hyundai Heavy Industries (Ulsan, South Korea) [5]
Yard number2678 [5]
Laid down10 October 2014 [5]
Launched27 December 2014 [5]
Christened5 January 2015 [1]
Completed5 March 2015 [5]
Identification
StatusGrounded in the Patapsco River after striking a bridge.
General characteristics
Class and type Neopanamax container ship
Tonnage
  • 95,128  GT
  • 52,150  NT
  • 116,851  DWT
Displacement148,984 t (146,631 long tons) [4]
Length299.92 m (984 ft)
Beam48.2 m (158 ft 2 in)
Draught15.03 m (49 ft 4 in)
Depth24.8 m (81 ft 4 in)
Installed power MAN-B&W 9S90ME-C9.2; 41,480 kW (55,630 hp)
PropulsionSingle shaft; fixed pitch propeller
Speed22 knots (41 km/h; 25 mph)
Capacity9,971  TEU

MV Dali is a Neopanamax container ship built in 2015 by Hyundai Heavy Industries, South Korea. On 26 March 2024, by then operated by Synergy Marine of Singapore, she collided with the Francis Scott Key Bridge in Baltimore, Maryland, United States, causing a catastrophic structural failure of the bridge.

Contents

Description

Dali is a Neopanamax container ship [6] with a length overall of 299.92 metres (984 ft), beam of 48.2 metres (158 ft 2 in), moulded depth of 24.8 metres (81 ft 4 in), and summer draft of 15.03 metres (49 ft 4 in). Her gross and net tonnages are 91,128 and 52,150, respectively, and her deadweight tonnage is 116,851 tonnes. Her container capacity is 9,971 twenty-foot equivalent units (TEU). [5]

Dali is propelled by a single low-speed two-stroke crosshead diesel engine coupled to a fixed-pitch propeller. Her main engine, a 9-cylinder MAN-B&W 9S90ME-C9.2 [7] unit manufactured by Hyundai Heavy Industries under license, is rated 41,480 kW (55,630 hp) at 82.5 rpm. [5] Her service speed is 22 knots (41 km/h; 25 mph). [1] For maneuvering in ports, Dali has a single 3,000 kW (4,000 hp) bow thruster. Electricity is generated onboard by two 3,840 kW (5,150 hp) and two 4,400 kW (5,900 hp) auxiliary diesel generators. [4]

Construction

On 14 May 2013, [4] Hyundai Heavy Industries was contracted to build two container ships based on the "Hyundai 9000 wide beam" design that was modified by relocating the wheelhouse from three-quarters aft to a more forward position to increase the container capacity from 9,034 to 9,962 TEU. [6] A further two similar ships were ordered for CMA CGM and four for Maersk later in 2013. [4]

The construction began in Ulsan, South Korea, in July 2014 and the hull with the yard number 2678 was laid down on 10 October 2014 and launched on 27 December of the same year. [5] On 5 January 2015, Dali and her sister ship Cezanne were named for painters Salvador Dalí and Paul Cézanne. [1]

Service

Dali was delivered to Stellar Marine LLC, a subsidiary of the Greek shipowner Oceanbulk Maritime SA, on 5 March 2015 and registered in Majuro, Marshall Islands. In October 2016, she was sold to Grace Ocean Pte. Ltd. and placed under the management of Synergy Marine Pte. Ltd., both based in Singapore where the ship was also reflagged. [2] The ship has been chartered to the Danish shipping and logistics company Maersk since it was delivered in 2015. [6]

While in the port of San Antonio, Chile, in June 2023, port state control inspection revealed a single deficiency related to "gauges, thermometers etc." in the ship's machinery, subsequently clarified as a monitor gauge for fuel pressure which was rectified prior to departure. [8] The ship was not detained, and at the follow-up inspection in the United States, three months later, no problems were identified. [2] [4] [9]

Incidents

Port of Antwerp 2016

On 11 July 2016, Dali collided with the berth at the container terminal in the Port of Antwerp, Belgium, causing significant damage to her stern and transom. [10] The berth was also damaged and closed for cargo handling operations. No injuries or water pollution were reported. [11]

Francis Scott Key Bridge 2024

Dali with bridge wreckage across her bow MV Dali and the Francis Scott Key Bridge collapse - 240326-A-SE916-6662.jpeg
Dali with bridge wreckage across her bow
Dali's size, though considered large, is less than that of the largest container ship. 20240330 Container ship sizes and capacities.svg
Dali's size, though considered large, is less than that of the largest container ship.

On 26 March 2024, Dali departed the Port of Baltimore in the United States, bound for Colombo, Sri Lanka, under while under charter to Maersk, [3] with a crew of 22 [13] and two pilots. [14] Shortly after leaving the port, the ship lost power, but was able to broadcast a mayday call. [15] Soon afterwards, she collided with a support pillar of the Francis Scott Key Bridge, causing the major part of the bridge to collapse, with one span falling onto the ship's forecastle. [16] [17] None of the 24 on board were seriously injured. All moving traffic had left the bridge, but six construction workers died. [18] [19] [20] The National Transportation Safety Board is conducting the investigation of the data recorder and interviewing the crew. There are 56 containers on board with 764 tons of hazardous materials, [21] among the total load of nearly 4,700 shipping containers. [22]

See also

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<span class="mw-page-title-main">Francis Scott Key Bridge collapse</span> 2024 bridge collapse near Baltimore, Maryland, US

On March 26, 2024, at 1:28 a.m. EDT, the main spans and the three nearest northeast approach spans of the Francis Scott Key Bridge across the Patapsco River in the Baltimore metropolitan area of Maryland, United States, collapsed after the container ship Dali struck one of its piers. Two people were rescued from the river; one had no injuries, while the other was transported to a hospital in critical condition. Six members of a maintenance crew working on the roadway were reported missing; three bodies were recovered, and the other three are presumed dead.

References

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