NBBJ

Last updated

NBBJ
Nbbj-logo-2022b.png
Practice information
Founders
Founded1943
Location Boston, Columbus, Hong Kong, London, Los Angeles, New York, Portland, Pune, San Francisco, Seattle, Shanghai, Washington D.C.
Coordinates 47°37′12″N122°19′51″W / 47.620089°N 122.330758°W / 47.620089; -122.330758 Coordinates: 47°37′12″N122°19′51″W / 47.620089°N 122.330758°W / 47.620089; -122.330758
Website
nbbj.com

NBBJ is an American global architecture, planning and design firm with offices in Boston, Columbus, Hong Kong, London, Los Angeles, New York, Portland, Pune, San Francisco, Seattle, Shanghai, and Washington, D.C..

Contents

NBBJ provides services in architecture, interiors, planning and urban design, experience design, healthcare and workplace consulting, landscape design, and lighting design. The firm is involved in multiple markets and building types including: cultural and civic, corporate, commercial, healthcare, education, science, sports, and urban environments. The firm has been named among the most innovative architecture firms by Fast Company, the fastest growing architecture firm, and the architecture firm of choice by Wired. [1] [2] [3]

The firm was an early signatory of the Architecture 2030 challenge, a global initiative stating that all new buildings and major renovations reduce their fossil-fuel GHG-emitting consumption by 50 percent by 2010, incrementally increasing the reduction for new buildings to carbon neutral by 2030. [4] In addition, the firm is recognized as CarbonNeutral® certified by Natural Capital Partners and has signed the Amazon Climate Pledge. [5] [6]

History

The firm was founded in 1943 by Seattle architects Floyd Naramore, William J. Bain, Clifton Brady, and Perry Johanson, and was initially called Naramore, Bain, Brady & Johanson. The architects formed the partnership during World War II to accept large-scale federal commissions in the area, including expansion of the Bremerton Naval Shipyard, but remained together after the war. [7] The firm remained focused on projects in the Pacific Northwest region, growing into its largest architectural firm, before accepting projects in other areas of the United States. In 1976, the firm merged with Columbus, Ohio-based Godwin, Nitschke, Bohm to form the modern "NBBJ". [8] [9]

Selected completed projects

Corporate/Commercial

Healthcare

Education

Science

Cultural and Civic

Sports/Expo

Urban Environments

Selected designers

Designers at NBBJ include: Steve McConnell (appointed managing partner in 2014), [81] [82] Jonathan Ward (partner), [83] [84] [85] Joan Saba, [86] [87] Robert Mankin (partner), [88] [89] Ryan Mullenix (partner), [90] [91] [92] and Tim Johnson (partner). [93] [94]

Recognition

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