Net national income

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In national income accounting, net national income (NNI) is net national product (NNP) minus indirect taxes. [1] Net national income encompasses the income of households, businesses, and the government. Net national income is defined as gross domestic product plus net receipts of wages, salaries and property income from abroad, minus the depreciation of fixed capital assets (dwellings, buildings, machinery, transport equipment and physical infrastructure) through wear and tear and obsolescence. [2]

It can be expressed as

NNI = C + I + G + (NX) + net foreign factor income – indirect taxes – manufactured capital depreciation [3]

where:

This formula uses the expenditure method of national income accounting.

When net national income is adjusted for natural resource depletion, it is called Adjusted Net National Income, expressed as

NNI* = C + I + G + NX + Net Foreign Factor Income – Indirect Taxes – manufactured capital depreciation – Natural Resource Depletion

Natural resources are non-critical natural capital such as minerals. NNI* does not take critical natural capital into account. Examples are air, water, land, etc.

For reference, capital (K) is divided into four categories:

See also

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References

  1. "Net National Income - What is Net National Income ? Net National Income meaning, Net National Income definition". The Economic Times. Retrieved 2019-02-23.
  2. "National income - Net national income - OECD Data". theOECD. Retrieved 2019-02-23.
  3. "What is net national income? definition and meaning". BusinessDictionary.com. Retrieved 2019-02-23.