OFC Women's Nations Cup

Last updated
OFC Women's Nations Cup
Founded1983
RegionOceania (OFC)
Number of teams4
Current championsFlag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand (6th title)
Most successful team(s)Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand (6 titles)
Soccerball current event.svg 2018 OFC Women's Nations Cup

The OFC Women's Nations Cup (previously known as the OFC Women's Championship) is a women's association football tournament for national teams who belong to the Oceania Football Confederation (OFC). It was held every three years from 1983 to 1989. Currently, the tournament is held at irregular intervals. Of the 11 tournaments that have been held, New Zealand won six of them.

Womens association football association football when played by women

Women's association football, usually known as women's football or women's soccer, is the most prominent team sport played by women around the globe. It is played at the professional level in numerous countries throughout the world and 176 national teams participate internationally.

Oceania Football Confederation body for association football in Oceania

The Oceania Football Confederation (OFC) is one of the six continental confederations of international association football, consisting of New Zealand, Papua New Guinea, Fiji, Tonga, and other Pacific Island countries. It promotes the game in Oceania and allows the member nations to qualify for the FIFA World Cup.

The New Zealand women's national football team, nicknamed the Football Ferns, is governed by New Zealand Football (NZF). The New Zealand national team qualified for the 2007 FIFA Women's World Cup, held in China in September 2007, sending the team to their first World Cup in 16 years, and the second since their 1975 debut in international competition.

Contents

The competition has served as a qualifying tournament for the FIFA Women's World Cup since 1991. In 2007, the competition took place in Papua New Guinea for the second time. Tonga and the Solomon Islands each took part for the first time in the four-team event, which was plagued by withdrawals from six squads.

FIFA Womens World Cup Association football competition for womens national teams

The FIFA Women's World Cup is an international football competition contested by the senior women's national teams of the members of Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA), the sport's international governing body. The competition has been held every four years since 1991, when the inaugural tournament, then called the FIFA Women's World Championship, was held in China. Under the tournament's current format, national teams vie for 23 slots in a three-year qualification phase. The host nation's team is automatically entered as the 24th slot. The tournament proper, alternatively called the World Cup Finals, is contested at venues within the host nation(s) over a period of about one month.

Papua New Guinea Constitutional monarchy in Oceania

Papua New Guinea, officially the Independent State of Papua New Guinea is a country in Oceania that occupies the eastern half of the island of New Guinea and its offshore islands in Melanesia, a region of the southwestern Pacific Ocean north of Australia. Its capital, located along its southeastern coast, is Port Moresby. The western half of New Guinea forms the Indonesian provinces of Papua and West Papua. It is the world's 3rd largest island country with 462,840 km2 (178,700 sq mi).

The Tonga women's national football team represents Tonga in international women's football. The team is controlled by the Tonga Football Association. Their best title was Third in the 2007 OFC Women's Championship.

The most recent edition was played in November 2018 in New Caledonia and was won by New Zealand for the sixth time. [1]

Only three nations have won the trophy: Australia (3 times), New Zealand (6 times) and Chinese Taipei (2 times).

Australia womens national soccer team womens national association football team representing Australia

The Australian women's national soccer team is overseen by the governing body for soccer in Australia, Football Federation Australia (FFA), which is currently a member of the Asian Football Confederation (AFC) and the regional ASEAN Football Federation (AFF) since leaving the Oceania Football Confederation (OFC) in 2006. The team's official nickname is the Matildas, having been known as the Female Socceroos before 1995. Under a naming rights deal with Scentre Group and its predecessor, Westfield Group, the team has been branded as Westfield Matildas since 2008.

Chinese Taipei womens national football team womens national association football team representing Taiwan

The Chinese Taipei women's national football team is the international women's football team for Taiwan.

Australia ceased to be a member of the OFC on January 1, 2006, having elected to join the Asian Football Confederation (AFC), and hence no longer participate in the tournament.

Asian Football Confederation governing body of association football in Asia

The Asian Football Confederation (AFC) is the governing body of association football in Asia and Australia. It has 47 member countries, mostly located on the Asian and Australian continent, but excludes the transcontinental countries with territory in both Europe and Asia – Azerbaijan, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Russia, and Turkey – which are instead members of UEFA. Three other states located geographically along the western fringe of Asia – Cyprus, Armenia and Israel – are also UEFA members. On the other hand, Australia, formerly in the OFC, joined the Asian Football Confederation in 2006, and the Oceanian island of Guam, a territory of the United States, is also a member of AFC, in addition to Northern Mariana Islands, one of the Two Commonwealths of the United States. Hong Kong and Macau, although not independent countries, are also members of the AFC.

History

First Tournaments (1983–1989)

The OFC Women's Nations Cup started in 1983 (as the OFC Women's Championship). The first edition took place in New Caledonia, and was won by New Zealand, after defeating Australia 3–2 in Nouméa. New Caledonia and Fiji also participated in this edition.

New Caledonia Overseas territory of France in the southwest Pacific Ocean

New Caledonia is a special collectivity of France, currently governed under the Nouméa Accord, located in the southwest Pacific Ocean, to the south of Vanuatu, about 1,210 km (750 mi) east of Australia and 20,000 km (12,000 mi) from Metropolitan France. The archipelago, part of the Melanesia subregion, includes the main island of Grande Terre, the Loyalty Islands, the Chesterfield Islands, the Belep archipelago, the Isle of Pines, and a few remote islets. The Chesterfield Islands are in the Coral Sea. French people, and especially locals, refer to Grande Terre as Le Caillou.

Nouméa Commune in New Caledonia, France

Nouméa is the capital and largest city of the French special collectivity of New Caledonia. It is situated on a peninsula in the south of New Caledonia's main island, Grande Terre, and is home to the majority of the island's European, Polynesian, Indonesian, and Vietnamese populations, as well as many Melanesians, Ni-Vanuatu and Kanaks who work in one of the South Pacific's most industrialised cities. The city lies on a protected deepwater harbour that serves as the chief port for New Caledonia.

New Zealand hosted the second edition in 1986, won by guests Chinese Taipei, after beating Australia 4–1. A second New Zealand team also played in this tournament.

Chinese Taipei won again in 1989, on Australian soil, against New Zealand. This edition marked the debut of Papua New Guinea, who lost all of its games.

First World Cup qualifiers (1991–1995)

The tournament returned in 1991, again in Australia; with only three teams: the hosts, New Zealand and Papua New Guinea. This competition also served as the qualifying process for the 1991 FIFA Women's World Cup. New Zealand finished first and qualified for the World Cup.

In 1995, Papua New Guinea was the host. This edition featured the same teams from the previous edition. Australia won the tournament this time and qualified for the 1995 FIFA Women's World Cup in Sweden.

1998 to today

The American Samoa and Samoa made their debuts in 1998. This time, the competition took place in Australia, and was won by them. The country won again in 2003. This was their last participation on the championship before moving to the Asian Football Confederation in 2006.

The following editions were all won by New Zealand, with Papua New Guinea in the second place.

Results

The top four placed teams so far were: [2]

YearHostFinalThird place play-offNumber of teams
WinnerScoreRunner-up3rd placeScore4th place
1983 Flag of France (1794-1815, 1830-1958).svg  New Caledonia Flag of New Zealand.svg
New Zealand
3–2Flag of Australia (converted).svg
Australia
Flag of France (1794-1815, 1830-1958).svg
New Caledonia
Round robin Flag of Fiji.svg
Fiji
4
1986 Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand Flag of Chinese Taipei (FIFA).svg
Chinese Taipei
4–1Flag of Australia (converted).svg
Australia
Flag of New Zealand.svg
New Zealand
0–0( a.e.t. )
(3–1 p )
Flag of New Zealand.svg
New Zealand B
4
1989 Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia Flag of Chinese Taipei (FIFA).svg
Chinese Taipei
1–0Flag of New Zealand.svg
New Zealand
Flag of Australia (converted).svg
Australia [upper-alpha 1]
Round robin [upper-alpha 1] Flag of Australia (converted).svg
Australia B [upper-alpha 1]
5
1991 Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia Flag of New Zealand.svg
New Zealand
Round robin Flag of Australia (converted).svg
Australia
Flag of Papua New Guinea.svg
Papua New Guinea
N/A3
1994 Flag of Papua New Guinea.svg  Papua New Guinea Flag of Australia (converted).svg
Australia
Round robin Flag of New Zealand.svg
New Zealand
Flag of Papua New Guinea.svg
Papua New Guinea
N/A3
1998 Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand Flag of Australia (converted).svg
Australia
3–1Flag of New Zealand.svg
New Zealand
Flag of Papua New Guinea.svg
Papua New Guinea
7–1Flag of Fiji.svg
Fiji
6
2003 Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia Flag of Australia (converted).svg
Australia
Round robin Flag of New Zealand.svg
New Zealand
Flag of Papua New Guinea.svg
Papua New Guinea
Round robin Flag of Samoa.svg
Samoa
5
2007 Flag of Papua New Guinea.svg  Papua New Guinea Flag of New Zealand.svg
New Zealand
Round robin Flag of Papua New Guinea.svg
Papua New Guinea
Flag of Tonga.svg
Tonga
Round robin Flag of the Solomon Islands.svg
Solomon Islands
4
2010 Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand Flag of New Zealand.svg
New Zealand
11–0Flag of Papua New Guinea.svg
Papua New Guinea
Flag of the Cook Islands.svg
Cook Islands
2–0Flag of the Solomon Islands.svg
Solomon Islands
8
2014 Flag of Papua New Guinea.svg  Papua New Guinea Flag of New Zealand.svg
New Zealand
Round robin Flag of Papua New Guinea.svg
Papua New Guinea
Flag of the Cook Islands.svg
Cook Islands
Round robin Flag of Tonga.svg
Tonga
4
2018 New Caledonia flags merged (2017).svg  New Caledonia Flag of New Zealand.svg
New Zealand
8–0Flag of Fiji.svg
Fiji
Flag of Papua New Guinea.svg
Papua New Guinea
7–1New Caledonia flags merged (2017).svg
New Caledonia
8

Notes

  1. 1 2 3 The third place play-off scheduled to take place between Australia and Australia B was cancelled due to waterlogged pitch, so their group standings are used. [3]

Teams reaching the top four

TeamChampionsRunners-upThird-placeFourth-place
Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand 6 (1983, 1991, 2007, 2010, 2014, 2018)4 (1989, 1994, 1998, 2003)1 (1983)
Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia 13 (1994, 1998, 2003)3 (1983, 1986, 1991)1 (1989)
Flag of Chinese Taipei (FIFA).svg  Chinese Taipei 2 (1986, 1989)
Flag of Papua New Guinea.svg  Papua New Guinea 3 (2007, 2010, 2014)5 (1991, 1994, 1998, 2003, 2018)
Flag of Fiji.svg  Fiji 1 (2018)2 (1983, 1998)
Flag of the Cook Islands.svg  Cook Islands 2 (2010, 2014)
Flag of Tonga.svg  Tonga 1 (2007)1 (2014)
New Caledonia flags merged (2017).svg  New Caledonia 1 (1983)1 (2018)
Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia B1 (1989)
Flag of the Solomon Islands.svg  Solomon Islands 2 (2007, 2010)
Flag of Samoa.svg  Samoa 1 (2003)
Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand B1 (1986)

Participating nations

A total of 15 teams have participated in the tournament, including all 11 current full OFC members (associate members are not allowed entry). Additionally, former OFC members Australia and Chinese Taipei previously participated. The secondary teams of Australia and New Zealand also each participated once.

India were set to enter the 1989 tournament as invited guests, but withdrew after being refused permission to participate by the Indian government.

Legend
Team Flag of France (1794-1815, 1830-1958).svg
1983
Flag of New Zealand.svg
1986
Flag of Australia (converted).svg
1989
Flag of Australia (converted).svg
1991
Flag of Papua New Guinea.svg
1994
Flag of New Zealand.svg
1998
Flag of Australia (converted).svg
2003
Flag of Papua New Guinea.svg
2007
Flag of New Zealand.svg
2010
Flag of Papua New Guinea.svg
2014
New Caledonia flags merged (2017).svg
2018
Total
Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand 1st3rd2nd1st2nd2nd2nd1st1st1st1st11
Flag of Papua New Guinea.svg  Papua New Guinea ×5th3rd3rd3rd3rd2nd2nd2nd3rd9
Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia [lower-alpha 1] 2nd2nd3rd [lower-alpha 2] 2nd1st1st1st7
Flag of the Cook Islands.svg  Cook Islands 5th×3rd3rdGS4
Flag of Fiji.svg  Fiji 4th4th××GS2nd4
Flag of Tonga.svg  Tonga ×3rdGS4thGS4
Flag of Samoa.svg  Samoa GS4th×GS3
Flag of Chinese Taipei (FIFA).svg  Chinese Taipei [lower-alpha 1] 1st1st2
New Caledonia flags merged (2017).svg  New Caledonia 3rd [lower-alpha 3] ×4th2
Flag of the Solomon Islands.svg  Solomon Islands 4th4th2
Flag of French Polynesia.svg  Tahiti ××GSGS2
Flag of American Samoa.svg  American Samoa GS×1
Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia B [lower-alpha 1] [lower-alpha 4] 4th [lower-alpha 2] 1
Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand B [lower-alpha 4] 4th1
Flag of Vanuatu.svg  Vanuatu ××GS1

Notes

  1. 1 2 3 Former OFC member, but now a member of the Asian Football Confederation.
  2. 1 2 The third place play-off scheduled to take place between Australia and Australia B was cancelled due to waterlogged pitch, so their group standings are used.
  3. New Caledonia participated and hosted the tournament in 1983, but were not a member of the OFC or FIFA until 2004.
  4. 1 2 Secondary national team.

Records and statistics

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References

  1. "New Zealand collect Canada 2015 ticket". FIFA. 29 October 2014. Retrieved 29 October 2014.
  2. "Oceania Cup (Women)". RSSSF. Retrieved 26 January 2013.
  3. http://www.rsssf.com/tableso/oc-women89.html