Sepo County

Last updated
Sep'o County
세포군
County
세포군 · Sepo County
Korean transcription(s)
   Chosŏn'gŭl
   Hancha
   McCune–Reischauer Sep'o-gun
   Revised Romanization Sepo-gun
NK-Gangwon-Seipo.png
Country North Korea
Province Kangwŏn Province
Administrative divisions 1 ŭp, 1 workers' district, 24 ri
Area
  Total 969 km2 (374 sq mi)
Population (1991 est.)
  Total 100,000

Sep'o County is a kun, or county, in Kangwŏn province, North Korea. It was created as a separate entity following the division of Korea.

Administrative divisions of North Korea

The administrative divisions of North Korea are organized into three hierarchical levels. These divisions were discovered in 2002. Many of the units have equivalents in the system of South Korea. At the highest level are nine provinces, two directly governed cities, and three special administrative divisions. The second-level divisions are cities, counties, wards, and districts. These are further subdivided into third-level entities: towns, neighborhoods, villages, and workers' districts.

Kangwon Province (North Korea) Province in North Korea

Kangwon Province is a province of North Korea, with its capital at Wŏnsan. Before the division of Korea in 1945, Kangwŏn Province and its South Korean neighbour Gangwon Province formed a single province that excluded Wŏnsan.

North Korea Sovereign state in East Asia

North Korea, officially the Democratic People's Republic of Korea, is a country in East Asia constituting the northern part of the Korean Peninsula, with Pyongyang the capital and the largest city in the country. The name Korea is derived from Goguryeo which was one of the great powers in East Asia during its time, ruling most of the Korean Peninsula, Manchuria, parts of the Russian Far East and Inner Mongolia, under Gwanggaeto the Great. To the north and northwest, the country is bordered by China and by Russia along the Amnok and Tumen rivers; it is bordered to the south by South Korea, with the heavily fortified Korean Demilitarized Zone (DMZ) separating the two. Nevertheless, North Korea, like its southern counterpart, claims to be the legitimate government of the entire peninsula and adjacent islands. Both North Korea and South Korea became members of the United Nations in 1991.

Contents

Physical features

The county is primarily mountainous, and is traversed by the Masingryŏng and Kwangju ranges. There are numerous mountains outside of these two ranges as well. The chief streams include the Namdaech'ŏn, Yongjich'ŏn, and Komitanch'ŏn (고미탄천). 75% of the county's area is occupied by forestland.

Administrative divisions

Sep'o county is divided into 1 ŭp (town), 1 rodongjagu (workers' district) and 24 ri (villages):

  • Sep'o-ŭp
  • Changch'ol-lodongjagu
  • Chŏngdong-ri
  • Chungp'yŏng-ri
  • Chungsam-ri
  • Ch'ŏn'gi-ri
  • Ch'up'yŏng-ri
  • Kisal-li
  • Naep'yŏng-ri
  • Paeksal-li
  • Pokmal-li
  • Pukp'yŏng-ri
  • Rimong-ri
  • Sambang-ri
  • Sangsul-li
  • Sindong-ri
  • Sinsaeng-ri
  • Sŏha-ri
  • Songp'o-ri
  • Sŏngp'yŏng-ri
  • Sŏngsal-li
  • Taegong-ri
  • Taemul-li
  • Wŏnnam-ri
  • Yaksu-ri
  • Yuyŏl-li

Economy

Sep'o is host to deposits of molybdenum, silver, zinc, and fluorite. Agriculture also contributes to the local economy; Sepo is particularly known for its radishes. In addition, livestock raising and orcharding play a role, and there is some small-scale manufacturing as well.

Molybdenum Chemical element with atomic number 42

Molybdenum is a chemical element with symbol Mo and atomic number 42. The name is from Neo-Latin molybdaenum, from Ancient Greek Μόλυβδος molybdos, meaning lead, since its ores were confused with lead ores. Molybdenum minerals have been known throughout history, but the element was discovered in 1778 by Carl Wilhelm Scheele. The metal was first isolated in 1781 by Peter Jacob Hjelm.

Silver Chemical element with atomic number 47

Silver is a chemical element with symbol Ag and atomic number 47. A soft, white, lustrous transition metal, it exhibits the highest electrical conductivity, thermal conductivity, and reflectivity of any metal. The metal is found in the Earth's crust in the pure, free elemental form, as an alloy with gold and other metals, and in minerals such as argentite and chlorargyrite. Most silver is produced as a byproduct of copper, gold, lead, and zinc refining.

Zinc Chemical element with atomic number 30

Zinc is a chemical element with symbol Zn and atomic number 30. It is the first element in group 12 of the periodic table. In some respects zinc is chemically similar to magnesium: both elements exhibit only one normal oxidation state (+2), and the Zn2+ and Mg2+ ions are of similar size. Zinc is the 24th most abundant element in Earth's crust and has five stable isotopes. The most common zinc ore is sphalerite (zinc blende), a zinc sulfide mineral. The largest workable lodes are in Australia, Asia, and the United States. Zinc is refined by froth flotation of the ore, roasting, and final extraction using electricity (electrowinning).

Transport

Sep'o county is served by several stations on the Kangwŏn and Ch'ŏngnyŏn Ich'ŏn lines of the Korean State Railway, including Sep'o Ch'ŏngnyŏn station in Sep'o-ŭp, which is the junction point of the two lines.

Kangwon Line railway line

The Kangwŏn Line is a 145.8 km (90.6 mi) electrified standard-gauge trunk line of the Korean State Railway of North Korea, connecting Kowŏn on the P'yŏngra Line to P'yŏnggang, providing an east–west connection between the P'yŏngra and Ch'ŏngnyŏn Ich'ŏn lines.

Chongnyon Ichon Line railway line

The Ch'ŏngnyŏn Ich'ŏn Line is an electrified standard-gauge secondary mainline of the Korean State Railway running from P'yŏngsan on the P'yŏngbu Line to Sep'o on the Kangwŏn Line. The 141.3 km (87.8 mi) line is the southernmost of the three east-west transversal mainlines in North Korea.

Korean State Railway

The Korean State Railway is the operating arm of the Ministry of Railways of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea and has its headquarters at P'yŏngyang. The current Minister of Railways is Chon Kil-su, who has held the position since 2009.

See also

Geography of North Korea

North Korea is located in east Asia on the northern half of the Korean Peninsula.

Related Research Articles

Munchon Municipal City in Kangwon Province, North Korea

Munch'ŏn is a North Korean city located in Kangwŏn Province. It lies on the coast of the Sea of Japan and borders Wonsan.

Kowon County County in South Hamgyong Province, North Korea

Kowŏn County is a county in South Hamgyŏng province, North Korea. It lies at the southern tip of the province.

Kosong County County in Kangwŏn Province, North Korea

Kosŏng County is a kun, or county, in Kangwŏn province, North Korea. It lies in the southeasternmost corner of North Korea, immediately north of the Korean Demilitarized Zone. Prior to the end of the Korean War in 1953, it made up a single county, together with what is now the South Korean county of the same name. In a subsequent reorganization, the county absorbed the southern portion of Tongch'ŏn county.

Anbyon County County in Kangwon Province, North Korea

Anbyŏn is a kun, or county, in Kangwŏn province, North Korea. Originally included in South Hamgyŏng province, it was transferred to Kangwŏn province in a September 1946 reshuffling of local government.

Chonnae County County in Kangwŏn Province, North Korea

Ch'ŏnnae County is a kun, or county, in Kangwŏn province, North Korea. Originally part of Munch'ŏn, it was made a separate county as part of the general reorganization of local government in December 1952.

Hoeyang County County in Kangwŏn Province, North Korea

Hoeyang County is a kun, or county, in Kangwŏn province, North Korea. It was established in a general reorganization of local government in 1952.

Ichon County County in Kangwŏn Province, North Korea

Ich'ŏn County is a kun, or county, in northern Kangwŏn province, North Korea. The terrain is predominantly high and mountainous; the highest point is Myongidoksan, 1,585 meters above sea level. The county's borders run along the Masingryong and Ryongam ranges. The chief stream is the Rimjin River.

Kosan County County in Kangwŏn Province, North Korea

Kosan County is a kun, or county, in Kangwŏn province, North Korea.

Poptong County County in Kangwŏn Province, North Korea

Pŏptong County is a kun in the Kangwŏn province, North Korea.

Pangyo County County in Kangwŏn Province, North Korea

P'an'gyo County is a kun, or county, in Kangwŏn province, North Korea. In December 1952, during the Korean War, P'an'gyo was formed as a separate county from five myŏn of Ichŏn-gun and Yujin-myŏn of P'yŏnggang-gun. Myŏn were administrative units below county (kun) level and are no longer used in North Korea.

Kumgang County County in Kangwŏn Province, North Korea

Kŭmgang County is a kun, or county, in Kangwŏn province, North Korea. Kŭmgang lies immediately north of the Korean Demilitarized Zone. It was formed in 1952 from a portion of Hoeyang County and from those sections of Yanggu, and Rinje counties that remained under Northern control after the armistice. The county takes its name from the Mount Kŭmgang, which is partially located there. The county seat, Kŭmgang-ŭp, was formerly called Malhwi-ri.

Tongchon County County in Kangwŏn Province, North Korea

T'ongch'ŏn County is a kun, or county, in Kangwŏn province, North Korea. It abuts the Sea of Japan to the north and east. Famous people from T'ongch'ŏn include former Hyundai chairman Chung Ju-yung, who is believed to have been born there.

Pyonggang County County in Kangwŏn, North Korea

P'yŏnggang County is a kun, or county, in Kangwŏn province, North Korea. It borders Sep'o to the north, Ch'ŏrwŏn to the south, Ich'ŏn to the west, and Kimhwa to the east.

Unhung County County in Ryanggang, North Korea

Unhŭng County is a kun, or county, in Ryanggang Province, North Korea. It was created following the division of Korea from portions of Hyesan and Kapsan.

Kujang County County in North Pyŏngan, North Korea

Kujang County is a kun, or county, in southeastern North P'yŏngan province, North Korea. It was created in 1952 from part of Nyŏngbyŏn county, as part of a nationwide reorganization of local government. It borders Nyŏngbyŏn on the west, Hyangsan and Unsan counties on the north, Nyŏngwŏn on the east, and Kaech'ŏn and Tŏkch'ŏn cities to the south.

Taechon County County in North Pyŏngan, North Korea

T'aechŏn County is a kun, or county, in central North P'yŏngan province, North Korea. It borders Taegwan and Tongch'ang to the north, Unsan and Nyŏngbyŏn to the east, Pakch'ŏn and Unjŏn to the south, and Kusŏng to the west.

P'yŏngsan Station is a railway station located in P'yŏngsan-ŭp P'yŏngsan County, North Hwanghae province, North Korea. It serves as the junction point of two railway lines - the P'yŏngbu Line, which connects P'yŏngyang to Kaesŏng and the Ch'ŏngnyŏn Ich'ŏn Line, which runs from P'yŏngsan to Sep'ŏ where it connects to the Kangwŏn Line.

Sep'o Ch'ŏngnyŏn Station is a railway station in Sep'o-ŭp, Sep'o county, Kangwŏn province, North Korea; it is the junction point of the Kangwŏn and Ch'ŏngnyŏn Ich'ŏn lines of the Korean State Railway.