Sin (1915 film)

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Sin
Theda Bara in Sin.jpg
Theda Bara, photograph by Jack Freulich
Directed by Herbert Brenon
Written byHerbert Brenon
Story byHerbert Brenon
Starring Theda Bara
William E. Shay
Cinematography Phil Rosen
Distributed by Fox Film Corporation
Release date
  • October 3, 1915 (1915-10-03)
Running time
50 minutes
CountryUnited States
Language Silent (English intertitles)

Sin is a 1915 American silent drama film written and directed by Herbert Brenon and starring Theda Bara. It was produced by Fox Film Corporation and shot at the Fox Studio in Fort Lee, New Jersey. [1] The film is now considered to be lost. [2]

Contents

Cast

Reception

In order to underscore and further enhance Theda Bara's image as a "vamp", Fox Film Corporation publicized the film with the tagline "Sin With Theda Bara!". [3] Upon its release, Sin was an enormous hit with audiences and Bara earned generally good reviews for her performance. Despite its success in other locations, the film was banned in Ohio and Georgia due to its themes of suicide, lust, Roman Catholic sacrilege, and love triangles. The Pittsburgh Board of Welfare condemned the film as did the Kansas Board of Censorship, although the latter apparently still allowed the film's presentation in Kansas theaters. [4] [5]

See also

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References

  1. Fort Lee: Birthplace of the Motion Picture Industry. Arcadia Publishing. 2006. p. 64. ISBN   0-738-54501-5.
  2. "Progressive Silent Film List: Sin". silentera.com. Retrieved June 28, 2008.
  3. Melton, J. Gordon (2010). The Vampire Book: The Encyclopedia of the Undead (3 ed.). Visible Ink Press. p.  39. ISBN   978-1-578-59281-4.
  4. Fort Lee: Birthplace of the Motion Picture Industry. Arcadia Publishing. 2006. p. 34. ISBN   0-738-54501-5.
  5. Butters, Gerald R. (2007). Banned in Kansas: Motion Picture Censorship, 1915-1966. University of Missouri Press. pp. 66–67. ISBN   978-0-826-26603-3.