Spin (magazine)

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Spin
Spin-logo.svg
Spin Magazine Cover.png
Kurt Cobain, Courtney Love, and their daughter Frances on Spin, December 1992 [1]
CategoriesMusic
Year founded1985;37 years ago (1985)
Final issueSeptember/October 2012 (print); 9 years ago
CompanyNext Management Partners
Country United States
Based in New York City, New York, U.S.
LanguageEnglish
Website spin.com
ISSN 0886-3032

Spin was an American music magazine founded in 1985 by publisher Bob Guccione, Jr. Now owned by Next Management Partners, the magazine is an online publication since it stopped issuing a print edition in 2012. Spin releases accolades and year-end lists in the categories of Artists of the Year, Single of the Year, and Album of the Year.

Contents

History

Early history

Spin was established in 1985 by Bob Guccione, Jr. [2] [3] In August 1987, the publisher announced it would stop publishing Spin, [4] but Guccione Jr. retained control of the magazine [5] and partnered with former MTV president David H. Horowitz to quickly revive the magazine. [4] During this time, it was published by Camouflage Publishing with Guccione Jr. serving as president and chief executive and Horowitz as investor and chairman. [4]

In its early years, Spin was known for its narrow music coverage with an emphasis on college rock, grunge, indie rock, and the ongoing emergence of hip-hop, while virtually ignoring other genres, such as country and metal. It pointedly provided a national alternative to Rolling Stone's more establishment-oriented style.[ citation needed ]Spin prominently placed rising acts such as R.E.M., [6] Prince, [7] Run-D.M.C., [8] Beastie Boys, [9] and Talking Heads on its covers [10] and did lengthy features on established figures such as Duran Duran, [11] Keith Richards, [12] Miles Davis, [13] Aerosmith, [14] Tom Waits, [15] and John Lee Hooker. [16]

On a cultural level, the magazine devoted significant coverage to punk, alternative country, electronica, reggae and world music, experimental rock, jazz of the most adventurous sort, burgeoning underground music scenes, and a variety of fringe styles. Artists such as the Ramones, Patti Smith, Blondie, X, Black Flag, and the former members of the Sex Pistols, The Clash, and the early punk and New Wave movements were heavily featured in Spin's editorial mix. Spin's extensive coverage of hip-hop music and culture, especially that of contributing editor John Leland, was notable at the time.[ citation needed ]

Editorial contributions by musical and cultural figures included Lydia Lunch, Henry Rollins, David Lee Roth and Dwight Yoakam. The magazine also reported on cities such as Austin, Texas, and Glasgow, Scotland, as cultural incubators in the independent music scene. A 1990 article on the contemporary country blues scene brought R. L. Burnside to national attention for the first time.[ citation needed ] Coverage of American cartoonists, Japanese manga, monster trucks, the AIDS crisis, outsider artists, Twin Peaks , and other non-mainstream cultural phenomena distinguished the magazine's early years.[ citation needed ] In July 1986, Spin published an exposé by Robert Keating on how the funds raised at the Live Aid concert might have been inappropriately used. [17] [18] Beginning in January 1988, Spin published a monthly series of articles about the AIDS epidemic titled "Words from the Front". [19]

In 1990, Spin hired John Skipper in the new position of publishing director and president while Guccione, Jr. continued to serve as editor and publisher. [20] In the early 1990s, Spin played an influential role on the grunge era, featuring alternative rock artists such as "Nirvana and PJ Harvey on its covers when more mainstream magazines often failed to acknowledge them". [1]

In 1994, two journalists working for the magazine were killed by a landmine while reporting on the Bosnian War in Bosnia and Herzegovina. A third, William T. Vollmann, was injured. [21]

In 1997, Guccione Jr. left the magazine after selling Spin [17] to Miller Publishing for $43.3 million. The new owner appointed Michael Hirschorn as editor-in-chief. [22] [23] A partnership made up of Robert Miller, David Salzman, and Quincy Jones, Miller Publishing also owned Vibe , [22] [24] which together made up Vibe/Spin Ventures. In 1999, Alan Light, who previously served as editor of Vibe succeeded Hirschorn at Spin. [25]

Later years

Sia Michel was appointed editor-in-chief in early 2002 to succeed Light. [26] [27] With Michel as editor, according to Evan Sawdey of PopMatters , "Spin was one of the most funny, engaging music publications out there, capable of writing about everyone from the Used to [ Kanye West] with an enthusiasm and deep-seated knowledge in genre archetypes that made for page-turning reading". [28] In 2003, Spin sent Chuck Klosterman, a senior writer who joined the magazine in the 1990s, on a trip to visit the death sites of famous artists in rock music, which became the basis of his 2005 book, Killing Yourself to Live: 85% of a True Story . [29] [30] Klosterman wrote for Spin until 2006. [31]

In February 2006, Miller Publishing sold the magazine to a San Francisco-based company called the McEvoy Group LLC, which was also the owner of Chronicle Books. [32] [33] That company formed Spin Media LLC as a holding company. [34] The new owners appointed Andy Pemberton, a former editor at Blender , to succeed Michel as editor-in-chief. [35] The first and only issue to be published under Pemberton's editorship was the July 2006 issue which featured Beyoncé on the cover. [36] [37] Pemberton resigned from Spin in June 2006 and was succeeded by Doug Brod, who was executive editor during Michel's tenure. [38]

In 2008, the magazine began publishing a complete digital edition of each issue. [39] For the 25th anniversary of Prince's Purple Rain , in 2009, Spin released "a comprehensive oral history of the film and album and a free downloadable tribute that features nine bands doing song-for-song covers of the record". [40]

In March 2010, the entire collection of Spin magazine back issues became freely readable on Google Books. [41] Brod remained editor until June 2011 when he was replaced by Steve Kandell who previously served as deputy editor. [39] In July 2011, for the 20th anniversary of Nirvana's 1991 album, Nevermind , the magazine released a tribute album including all 13 songs with each covered by a different artist. The album released for free on Facebook included covers by Butch Walker, Amanda Palmer and Titus Andronicus. [42]

With the March 2012 issue, Spin relaunched the magazine in a larger, bi-monthly format and, at the same time, expanded its online presence. [43] In July 2012, Spin was sold to Buzzmedia, which eventually renamed itself SpinMedia. [44] The September/October 2012 issue was the magazine's last print edition. [45] [46] It continued to publish entirely online with Caryn Ganz as its editor-in-chief. [46] In June 2013, Ganz was succeeded by Jem Aswad, [47] who was replaced by Craig Marks in June of the following year. [48]

In 2016, Puja Patel was appointed editor [49] and Eldridge Industries acquired SpinMedia via the Hollywood Reporter-Billboard Media Group for an undisclosed amount. [50] Matt Medved became editor in December 2018. [51]

Spin was acquired in 2020 by Next Management Partners. Jimmy Hutcheson serves chief executive officer [52] with Daniel Kohn as editorial director [53] and Spin's founder, Guccione Jr., who rejoined the magazine as creative advisor. [52]

Books

In 1995, Spin produced its first book, entitled Spin Alternative Record Guide . [54] It compiled writings by 64 music critics on recording artists and bands relevant to the alternative music movement, with each artist's entry featuring their discography and albums reviewed and rated a score between one and ten. [55] [56] According to Pitchfork Media's Matthew Perpetua, the book featured "the best and brightest writers of the 80s and 90s, many of whom started off in zines but have since become major figures in music criticism," including Rob Sheffield, Byron Coley, Ann Powers, Simon Reynolds, and Alex Ross. Although the book was not a sales success, "it inspired a disproportionate number of young readers to pursue music criticism." [57] After the book was published, its entry on 1960s folk artist John Fahey, written by Byron Coley, helped renew interest in Fahey's music, leading to interest from record labels and the alternative music scene. [58]

For Spin's 20th anniversary in 2005, it published a book, Spin: 20 Years of Alternative Music, chronicling the prior two decades in music. [59] The book has essays on grunge, Britpop, and emo, among other genres of music, as well as pieces on musical acts including Marilyn Manson, Tupac Shakur, R.E.M., Nirvana, Weezer, Nine Inch Nails, Limp Bizkit, and the Smashing Pumpkins.[ citation needed ]

Year-end lists

SPIN began compiling year-end lists in 1990.

Artist of the Year

YearArtistRef.
1994 The Smashing Pumpkins [60]
1995 PJ Harvey [61]
1996 Beck [62]
1997 The Notorious B.I.G. [63]
1998 Lauryn Hill [64]
1999 Rage Against the Machine [65]
2000 Eminem [66]
2001 U2 [67]
2002 The Strokes [68]
2003 Coldplay [69]
2004 Modest Mouse [70]
2005 M.I.A. [71]
2006Artists on YouTube and MySpace [72]
2007 Kanye West and Daft Punk [73]
2008 Lil Wayne [74]
2009 Kings of Leon [75]
2010 LCD Soundsystem, Florence and the Machine, and The Black Keys [76]
2011 Fucked Up [77]
2012 Death Grips [78]
2013 Mike Will Made It [79]
2014 Sia [80]
2015 Deafheaven [81]
2019 Billie Eilish [82]
2020 Run the Jewels [83]
2021 Turnstile [84]

Single of the Year

YearArtistSongNationRef.
1994 Beck "Loser"Flag of the United States.svg  United States [85]
1995 Moby "Feeling So Real"Flag of the United States.svg  United States [86]
1996 Fugees "Ready or Not"Flag of the United States.svg  United States [87]
1997 The Notorious B.I.G. "Hypnotize"Flag of the United States.svg  United States [88]
1998 Fatboy Slim "The Rockafeller Skank"Flag of England.svg  England [89]
1999 TLC "No Scrubs"Flag of the United States.svg  United States [90]
2000 Eminem "The Real Slim Shady"Flag of the United States.svg  United States [91]
2001 Missy Elliott "Get Ur Freak On"Flag of the United States.svg  United States [92]
2002 Eminem "Cleanin' Out My Closet"Flag of the United States.svg  United States [93]
2003 50 Cent "In da Club"Flag of the United States.svg  United States [94]
2004 Green Day "American Idiot"Flag of the United States.svg  United States [95]
2005 Gorillaz "Feel Good Inc."Flag of England.svg  England [96]
2006 Gnarls Barkley "Crazy"Flag of the United States.svg  United States [97]
2007 Kanye West "Stronger"Flag of the United States.svg  United States [98]
2008 M.I.A. "Paper Planes"Flag of England.svg  England [99]
2009 Yeah Yeah Yeahs "Zero"Flag of the United States.svg  United States [100]
2010 CeeLo Green "Fuck You"Flag of the United States.svg  United States [101]
2011 Adele "Rolling in the Deep"Flag of England.svg  England [102]
2012 GOOD Music "Mercy"Flag of the United States.svg  United States [103]
2013 Daft Punk "Get Lucky"Flag of France.svg  France [104]
2014 Future Islands "Seasons (Waiting on You)"Flag of the United States.svg  United States [105]
2015 Justin Bieber "What Do You Mean?"Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada [106]
2016 Rae Sremmurd "Black Beatles"Flag of the United States.svg  United States [107]
2017 Calvin Harris, Frank Ocean, and Migos "Slide"Flag of Scotland.svg  Scotland [108]
2018 Valee and Jeremih "Womp Womp"Flag of the United States.svg  United States [109]
2019 Big Thief "Orange"Flag of the United States.svg  United States [110]
2020 Bartees Strange "Boomer"Flag of England.svg  England [111]
2021 Japanese Breakfast "Be Sweet"Flag of the United States.svg  United States [112]

Album of the Year

YearArtistAlbumNationRef.
1990 Ice Cube AmeriKKKa's Most Wanted Flag of the United States.svg  United States [113]
1991 Teenage Fanclub Bandwagonesque Flag of Scotland.svg  Scotland [114]
1992 Pavement Slanted and Enchanted Flag of the United States.svg  United States [115]
1993 Liz Phair Exile in Guyville Flag of the United States.svg  United States [116]
1994 Hole Live Through This Flag of the United States.svg  United States [117]
1995 Moby Everything is Wrong Flag of the United States.svg  United States [118]
1996 Beck Odelay Flag of the United States.svg  United States [119]
1997 Cornershop When I Was Born for the 7th Time Flag of England.svg  England [120]
1998 Lauryn Hill The Miseducation of Lauryn Hill Flag of the United States.svg  United States [121]
1999 Nine Inch Nails The Fragile Flag of the United States.svg  United States [122]
2000 Radiohead Kid A Flag of England.svg  England [123]
2001 System of a Down Toxicity Flag of the United States.svg  United States [124]
2002 The White Stripes White Blood Cells Flag of the United States.svg  United States [125]
2003 Elephant [126]
2004 Kanye West The College Dropout Flag of the United States.svg  United States [127]
2005 Late Registration [128]
2006 TV on the Radio Return to Cookie Mountain Flag of the United States.svg  United States [129]
2007 Against Me! New Wave Flag of the United States.svg  United States [130]
2008 TV on the Radio Dear Science Flag of the United States.svg  United States [131]
2009 Animal Collective Merriweather Post Pavilion Flag of the United States.svg  United States [132]
2010 Kanye West My Beautiful Dark Twisted Fantasy Flag of the United States.svg  United States [133]
2011 Fucked Up David Comes to Life Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada [134]
2012 Frank Ocean Channel Orange Flag of the United States.svg  United States [135]
2013 Kanye West Yeezus Flag of the United States.svg  United States [136]
2014 The War on Drugs Lost in the Dream Flag of the United States.svg  United States [137]
2015 Kendrick Lamar To Pimp A Butterfly Flag of the United States.svg  United States [138]
2016 Solange Knowles A Seat at the Table Flag of the United States.svg  United States [139]
2017 Kendrick Lamar Damn. Flag of the United States.svg  United States [140]
2018 The 1975 A Brief Inquiry into Online Relationships Flag of England.svg  England [141]
2019 Big Thief Two Hands Flag of the United States.svg  United States [142]
2020 Fiona Apple Fetch the Bolt Cutters Flag of the United States.svg  United States [143]
2021 Turnstile Glow On Flag of the United States.svg  United States [144]

Note: The 2000 album of the year was awarded to "your hard drive", acknowledging the impact that filesharing had on the music listening experience in 2000. [145] Kid A was listed as number 2, the highest ranking given to an actual album.

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