Steve Fuller (American football)

Last updated

Steve Fuller
No. 4
Position: Quarterback
Personal information
Born: (1957-01-05) January 5, 1957 (age 65)
Enid, Oklahoma
Height:6 ft 4 in (1.93 m)
Weight:198 lb (90 kg)
Career information
High school: Spartanburg (SC)
College: Clemson
NFL Draft: 1979  / Round: 1 / Pick: 23
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
TDINT:28–41
Yards:7,156
Passer rating:70.1
Player stats at NFL.com  ·  PFR

Stephen Ray Fuller (born January 5, 1957) is a former American football quarterback who played in the National Football League (NFL) for eight seasons. He is best known as the backup quarterback of Chicago Bears from 1984 to 1986, including during their Super Bowl-winning season in 1985. Fuller also played for the Kansas City Chiefs and Los Angeles Rams.

Contents

Early life

Fuller was born in Enid, Oklahoma and graduated from Spartanburg High School in Spartanburg, South Carolina. [1]

College career

Fuller played college football at Clemson University in Clemson, South Carolina from 1975-1978. [2] He was a member of the Sigma Alpha Epsilon fraternity, [3] Fuller was a football and academic All-America at Clemson University.

1975 season

In 1975, Fuller was 22-of-46 for 354 yards with two touchdowns and three interceptions. In addition, he had 47 carries for 148 yards as Clemson finished with a 2-9 record.

1976 season

In 1976, Fuller was 58-of-116 for 835 yards with five touchdowns and six interceptions. In addition, he had 157 carries for 503 yards with six touchdowns as Clemson finished with a 3-6-2 record.

1977 season

In 1977, Fuller was 106-of-205 for 1,655 yards with eight touchdowns and eight interceptions. In addition, he had 178 carries for 437 yards with six touchdowns as Clemson finished with an 8-3-1 record.

1978 season

In 1978, Fuller was 101-of-187 for 1,515 yards with seven touchdowns and four interceptions. In addition, he had 153 carries for 649 yards and ten touchdowns as Clemson finished with an 11-1 record.

College statistics

Legend
Led the ACC
ACC record
Led the NCAA
NCAA Record
BoldCareer high
College passing & rushing statistics* [4]
SeasonSchoolGamesCmpAttYdsPctTDINTQBRCarYdsAvgTD
TeamPassingRushing
1975 Clemson 11224635447.8%23113.8471483.10
1976 Clemson 115811683550.0%56114.31575033.26
1977 Clemson 11961821,49752.7%84131.91654032.46
1978 Clemson 121011871,51554.0%74130.11536494.210
Career Clemson 452775314,20152.2%2217125.95221,7033.322

* Includes bowl games.

Professional career

Fuller was selected by the Kansas City Chiefs in the first round with the 23rd overall pick in the 1979 NFL Draft. [2] He played in the National Football League for seven years, most notably with the Chicago Bears as their backup quarterback from 1984–1986, including the Super Bowl XX championship season in 1985. [2] Fuller was named by Sports Illustrated as one of the top fifteen backup quarterbacks of all-time, based on his 1985 season with the Chicago Bears. [5]

After not throwing a single pass during the entire 1983 NFL season, Fuller came in for the Chicago Bears in Week 10 of the 1984 NFL season against the Los Angeles Raiders after an injury to starting quarterback Jim McMahon halfway through the game. McMahon missed the rest of the 1984 season and Fuller became the Bears starter, all the way to the 1984 NFC Championship game against the eventual Super Bowl champion San Francisco 49ers.

Fuller was awarded a gold record and a platinum video award for the 1985 "Super Bowl Shuffle", for which he was the sixth of the ten solo singers. [6] In 2010, during Super Bowl XLIV, Fuller joined other members of the 1985 Chicago Bears in recreating the Super Bowl Shuffle in a Boost Mobile commercial. [7]

Personal life

Fuller and his wife, Anna, have two children. The couple live in South Carolina where Fuller was a high school football coach at Hilton Head Prep School. Fuller currently works as offensive coordinator for the Hilton Head Island High School football team. [8]

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References

  1. "Steve Fuller". databaseFootball.com. Archived from the original on October 20, 2012. Retrieved November 10, 2012.
  2. 1 2 3 "Steve Fuller profile". pro-football-reference.com. Retrieved April 11, 2010.
  3. "SC Nu Athletics". Sigma Alpha Epsilon. Archived from the original on July 31, 2009. Retrieved April 11, 2010.
  4. "Steve Fuller college statistics". College Football at Sports-Reference.com. Retrieved July 14, 2019.
  5. "Backup plan saved Bears". ESPN Chicago. Retrieved November 10, 2012.
  6. "The Greatest Kansas City Chiefs, By The Numbers: #4". Arrowhead Pride. Retrieved November 10, 2012.
  7. Jon GreenbergColumnist, ESPNChicago.comFollowArchive (January 15, 2010). "Chicago Bears' "Super Bowl Shuffle" an enduring, endearing sports moment - ESPN Chicago". Sports.espn.go.com. Retrieved July 6, 2012.
  8. "Hilton Head Island High School Boys Varsity Football Fall 2016 Coaches". www.hiltonheadhighsports.org. Retrieved February 20, 2017.