Thomas R. Carskadon House

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Thomas R. Carskadon House
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Thomas R. Carskadon House
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Thomas R. Carskadon House
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Thomas R. Carskadon House
Location Carskadon Rd., Keyser, West Virginia
Coordinates 39°25′53″N78°59′17″W / 39.43139°N 78.98806°W / 39.43139; -78.98806 Coordinates: 39°25′53″N78°59′17″W / 39.43139°N 78.98806°W / 39.43139; -78.98806
Area 1 acre (0.40 ha)
Architectural style Italianate, Second Empire
NRHP reference # 02000900 [1]
Added to NRHP August 22, 2002

Thomas R. Carskadon House also known as the Carskadon Mansion and "Radical Hill," is a historic home located on Radical Hill overlooking Mineral Street (US 220), in Keyser, Mineral County, West Virginia. It is the former residence of Thomas R. Carskadon, an influential Mineral County farmer and political leader. It was built about 1886, and has two sections: a 2 1/2-story rectangular, brick main block and a two-story rear ell. It features a hip-on-mansard roof and two one-story, brick polygonal bays. It combines features of the Italianate and French Second Empire styles. Also on the property are the ruins of a brick dairy, the cement foundations of a silo, and the stone foundations of another outbuilding. [2]

Keyser, West Virginia City in West Virginia, United States

Keyser is a city in and the county seat of Mineral County, West Virginia, United States. It is part of the Cumberland, MD-WV Metropolitan Statistical Area. The population was 5,439 at the 2010 census.

Mineral County, West Virginia County in the United States

Mineral County is a county in the U.S. state of West Virginia. It is part of the Cumberland, MD-WV Metropolitan Statistical Area. As of the 2010 census, the population was 28,212. Its county seat is Keyser. The county was founded in 1866.

Thomas Rosabaum Carskadon from Keyser, West Virginia, U.S. had a national reputation as a Prohibition Party leader. He was the Prohibition candidate for Governor of West Virginia in 1884 and again in 1888. He was an influential Mineral County farmer and political leader.

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It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2002. [1]

National Register of Historic Places federal list of historic sites in the United States

The National Register of Historic Places (NRHP) is the United States federal government's official list of districts, sites, buildings, structures, and objects deemed worthy of preservation for their historical significance. A property listed in the National Register, or located within a National Register Historic District, may qualify for tax incentives derived from the total value of expenses incurred preserving the property.

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References

  1. 1 2 National Park Service (2010-07-09). "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places . National Park Service.
  2. Geoffrey B. Henry (March 2002). "National Register of Historic Places Inventory Nomination Form: Thomas R. Carskadon House" (PDF). State of West Virginia, West Virginia Division of Culture and History, Historic Preservation. Retrieved 2011-08-18.