Thomas Widdrington

Last updated

Sir Thomas Widdrington. SirThomasWiddrington.jpg
Sir Thomas Widdrington.

Sir Thomas Widdrington SL (died 13 May 1664) was an English judge and politician who sat in the House of Commons at various times between 1640 and 1664. He was speaker of the House of Commons in 1656.

English people Nation and ethnic group native to England

The English people are a nation and an ethnic group native to England who speak the English language. The English identity is of early medieval origin, when they were known in Old English as the Angelcynn. Their ethnonym is derived from the Angles, one of the Germanic peoples who migrated to Great Britain around the 5th century AD. England is the largest and most populous country of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, and the majority of people living there are British citizens.

Judge official who presides over court proceedings

A judge is a person who presides over court proceedings, either alone or as a part of a panel of judges. The powers, functions, method of appointment, discipline, and training of judges vary widely across different jurisdictions. The judge is supposed to conduct the trial impartially and, typically, in an open court. The judge hears all the witnesses and any other evidence presented by the barristers or solicitors of the case, assesses the credibility and arguments of the parties, and then issues a ruling on the matter at hand based on his or her interpretation of the law and his or her own personal judgment. In some jurisdictions, the judge's powers may be shared with a jury. In inquisitorial systems of criminal investigation, a judge might also be an examining magistrate.

A politician is a person active in party politics, or a person holding or seeking office in government. Politicians propose, support and create laws or policies that govern the land and, by extension, its people. Broadly speaking, a "politician" can be anyone who seeks to achieve political power in any bureaucratic institution.

Contents

Life

Widdrington was the son of Lewis Mauntlaine, alias Widdrington of Cheeseburn Grange, near Stamfordham, Northumberland. He was a student at Christ's College, Cambridge in 1617 and was awarded BA in 1621. He entered Gray's Inn in 1619 and was called to the bar in 1625. He succeeded to the estated of his father in 1630. He was Recorder of Berwick from 1631 to 1658 and Recorder of York from 1638 to 1658. He was knighted at York on 1 April 1639. [1]

Northumberland County of England

Northumberland is a unitary authority and a Historic County in North East England. The northernmost county of England, the unitary authority borders Cumbria to the west, County Durham and Tyne and Wear to the south and the Scottish Borders to the north. To the east is the North Sea coastline with a path 103 kilometres (64 mi) long. The county town is Alnwick, although the county council is based in Morpeth.

Christs College, Cambridge college of the University of Cambridge

Christ's College is a constituent college of the University of Cambridge. The college includes the Master, the Fellows of the College, and about 450 undergraduate and 170 graduate students. The college was founded by William Byngham in 1437 as God's House. In 1505, the college was granted a new royal charter, was given a substantial endowment by Lady Margaret Beaufort, and changed its name to Christ's College, becoming the twelfth of the Cambridge colleges to be founded in its current form. The college is renowned for educating some of Cambridge's most famous alumni, including Charles Darwin and John Milton.

Grays Inn one of the four Inns of Court in London, England

The Honourable Society of Gray's Inn, commonly known as Gray's Inn, is one of the four Inns of Court in London. To be called to the bar and practise as a barrister in England and Wales, a person must belong to one of these Inns. Located at the intersection of High Holborn and Gray's Inn Road in Central London, the Inn is both a professional body and a provider of office accommodation (chambers) for many barristers. It is ruled by a governing council called "Pension", made up of the Masters of the Bench, and led by the Treasurer, who is elected to serve a one-year term. The Inn is known for its gardens, or Walks, which have existed since at least 1597.

In April 1640 Widdrington was elected Member of Parliament for Berwick [2] in the Short Parliament. He was re-elected MP for Berwick for the Long Parliament in November 1640. As a barrister, his legal knowledge was useful during the English Civil War. In 1651 he was chosen a member of the Council of State, although he had declined to have any share in the trial of the king. [2] He was elected MP for York in 1654 for the First Protectorate Parliament. In 1656 he was elected MP for Northumberland in the Second Protectorate Parliament and was chosen as Speaker in September 1656, and in June 1658, he was appointed Lord Chief Baron of the Exchequer. In 1659 and again in 1660, he was a member of the Council of State, and on three occasions he was one of the Commissioners of the Great Seal. He lost some of his offices when Charles II was restored. [2] In 1660, he was elected MP for York in the Convention Parliament. He was elected MP for Berwick again in 1661 for the Cavalier Parliament. [1]

Short Parliament Parliament of England that was summoned by King Charles I of England

The Short Parliament was a Parliament of England that was summoned by King Charles I of England on 20 February 1640 and sat from 13 April to 5 May 1640. It was so called because of its short life of only three weeks.

Long Parliament English Parliament which lasted from 1640 until 1660

The Long Parliament was an English Parliament which lasted from 1640 until 1660. It followed the fiasco of the Short Parliament which had convened for only three weeks during the spring of 1640, and which in turn had followed an 11-year parliamentary absence. In September 1640, King Charles I issued writs summoning a parliament to convene on 3 November 1640. He intended it to pass financial bills, a step made necessary by the costs of the Bishops' Wars in Scotland. The Long Parliament received its name from the fact that, by Act of Parliament, it stipulated it could be dissolved only with agreement of the members; and, those members did not agree to its dissolution until 16 March 1660, after the English Civil War and near the close of the Interregnum.

Barrister lawyer specialized in court representation in Wales, England and some other jurisdictions

A barrister is a type of lawyer in common law jurisdictions. Barristers mostly specialise in courtroom advocacy and litigation. Their tasks include taking cases in superior courts and tribunals, drafting legal pleadings, researching the philosophy, hypothesis and history of law, and giving expert legal opinions.

Widdrington founded a school at Stamfordham, Northumberland, He wrote Analecta Eboracensia; some Remaynes of the city of York which was not published until 1877, when it was edited with introduction and notes by the Rev. Caesar Caine. [2]

Widdrington died in 1664. [1]

Family

Cheeseburn Grange today Cheeseburn Grange, Stamfordham (geograph 4206339).jpg
Cheeseburn Grange today

Widdrington married Frances Fairfax, a daughter of Ferdinando Fairfax, 2nd Lord Fairfax of Cameron and had five daughters, including Ursula, who married Thomas Hickman-Windsor, 1st Earl of Plymouth, and a son. However his son Thomas died in 1660 when MP for Morpeth. The estate at Cheeseburn Grange passed briefly to Widdrington's brother Henry and then to their brother Ralph. [1]

Ferdinando Fairfax, 2nd Lord Fairfax of Cameron English politician

Ferdinando Fairfax, 2nd Lord Fairfax of Cameron MP was an English nobleman and politician who sat in the House of Commons at various times between 1614 and 1648. He was a commander in the Parliamentary army in the English Civil War.

Thomas Hickman-Windsor, 1st Earl of Plymouth, PC was the son of Dixie Hickman and his wife Elizabeth Windsor, sister and heiress of Thomas, 6th Baron Windsor. He assumed the additional surname of Windsor and succeeded to the Windsor family's estate around Hewell Grange near Redditch in 1645. The same year he distinguished himself in the Battle of Naseby. Hickman-Windsor impressed King Charles I by relieving his garrison at High Ercall.

Thomas Widdrington was an English politician who sat in the House of Commons in 1660.

Notes

  1. 1 2 3 4 History of Parliament Widdrington, Sir Thomas (c. 1600–64) of Cheeseburn Grange, Stamfordham, Northumberland
  2. 1 2 3 4 Wikisource-logo.svg One or more of the preceding sentences incorporates text from a publication now in the public domain : Chisholm, Hugh, ed. (1911). "Widdrington, Barons". Encyclopædia Britannica . 28 (11th ed.). Cambridge University Press. p. 620.
Parliament of England
Preceded by
No Parliament
Member of Parliament for Berwick
1640–1653
With: Hugh Potter 1640/ Robert Scawen 1640–1653
Succeeded by
Berwick not represented
Preceded by
Thomas St. Nicholas
Member of Parliament for York
1654–1656
With: Thomas Dickinson 1654–1656
Succeeded by
Thomas Dickinson
John Geldert
Preceded by
William Fenwick
Robert Fenwick
Henry Ogle
Member of Parliament for Northumberland
1656–1659
With: William Fenwick
Robert Fenwick
Succeeded by
Sir William Fenwick, Bt
Robert Fenwick
Preceded by
John Rushworth
George Payler
Member of Parliament for Berwick
Apr 1660
With: John Rushworth
Succeeded by
John Rushworth
Edward Grey
Preceded by
Sir William Allanson
Thomas Hoyle
Member of Parliament for York
Jun 1660 1661
With: Sir Metcalfe Robinson, Bt
Succeeded by
Sir Metcalfe Robinson, Bt
John Scott
Preceded by
John Rushworth
Edward Grey
Member of Parliament for Berwick
1661
With: Edward Grey
Succeeded by
Edward Grey
Daniel Collingwood
Political offices
Preceded by
William Lenthall
Speaker of the House of Commons
1656–1658
Succeeded by
Sir Bulstrode Whitelocke
Legal offices
Preceded by
Sir William Steele
Lord Chief Baron of the Exchequer
1658–1660
Succeeded by
Sir John Wilde

Related Research Articles

Sir Harbottle Grimston, 2nd Baronet English lawyer and politician

Sir Harbottle Grimston, 2nd Baronet was an English lawyer and politician who sat in the House of Commons at various times between 1640 and 1685 and was Speaker in 1660. During the English Civil War he remained a Parliamentarian but was sympathetic to the Royalists.

John Rushworth English lawyer, historian and politician

John Rushworth was an English lawyer, historian and politician who sat in the House of Commons at various times between 1657 and 1685. He compiled a series of works covering the English Civil Wars throughout the 17th century called Historical Collections and also known as the Rushworth Papers.

William Widdrington, 1st Baron Widdrington was an English landowner and politician who sat in the House of Commons from 1640 to 1642 and was created a peer in 1643. He fought in the Royalist army in the English Civil War and was killed in battle in 1651.

The Ogle family was prominent landed gentry in Northumberland from before the time of the Norman Conquest. The earliest appearances of the family name were written Hoggel, Oggehill, Ogille and Oghill.

Thomas Bampfield or Bampfylde was an English lawyer and politician who sat in the House of Commons between 1654 and 1660. He was Speaker of the House of Commons in 1659.

Sir Philip Wodehouse, 3rd Baronet was an English politician who sat in the House of Commons at various times between 1654 and 1660.

Anthony Nicholl was an English politician who sat in the House of Commons, variously between 1640 and 1656. He supported the Parliamentary side in the English Civil War.

William Jephson (died 1658) English diplomat

William Jephson was an English politician who sat in the House of Commons from 1640 to 1648. He served in the Parliamentary army and was Cromwell's envoy to Sweden.

William Carnaby (1595–1645) was an English politician who sat in the House of Commons in 1640. He fought on the Royalist side in the English Civil War.

Thomas Gorges was an English lawyer and politician who sat in the House of Commons between 1654 and 1660. He was a colonial governor of the Province of Maine from 1640 to 1643 and served as an officer in the Parliamentary Army during the English Civil War.

Sir Henry Peckham (1615–1673) was an English politician who sat in the House of Commons at various times between 1654 and 1673.

Henry Widdrington (died 1665) English politician

Henry Widdrington of Stamfordham, Northumberland was an English politician.

Henry Arthington was an English politician who sat in the House of Commons at various times between 1646 and 1660.

Sir Richard Grobham Howe, 2nd Baronet was an English politician who sat in the House of Commons at various times between 1656 and 1695.

Robert Scawen (1602–1670) was an English politician who sat in the House of Commons at various times between 1640 and 1670. He supported the Parliamentary cause in the English Civil War.

Richard Croke was an English lawyer and politician who sat in the House of Commons in 1654.

Jeremiah Tolhurst was an English tailor, soldier, businessman and politician who sat in the House of Commons at various times between 1654 and 1660. He fought in the Parliamentary army in the English Civil War.

Richard Lucy English politician

Richard Lucy of Charlecote Park, Warwickshire was an English landowner and politician who sat in the House of Commons from 1653.

Edward Grey of Ulgham Grange, Northumberland was an English politician who sat in the House of Commons from 1660 to 1676. He fought in the Royalist army in the English Civil War.