Thoressa

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Thoressa
Kochabaneseseri 08a9463.jpg
Thoressa varia
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Arthropoda
Class: Insecta
Order: Lepidoptera
Family: Hesperiidae
Subfamily: Hesperiinae
Tribe: Astictopterini
Genus:Thoressa
Swinhoe, 1913
Species

See text

Thoressa is a genus of skipper butterflies. They are (like some other skippers) commonly known as "aces" or "ace butterflies". The genus is endemic to Southeast Asia with many species endemic to China.

A genus is a taxonomic rank used in the biological classification of living and fossil organisms, as well as viruses, in biology. In the hierarchy of biological classification, genus comes above species and below family. In binomial nomenclature, the genus name forms the first part of the binomial species name for each species within the genus.

Southeast Asia Subregion of Asia

Southeast Asia or Southeastern Asia is a subregion of Asia, consisting of the countries that are geographically south of Japan, Korea and China, east of India, west of Papua New Guinea, and north of Australia. Southeast Asia is bordered to the north by East Asia, to the west by South Asia and the Bay of Bengal, to the east by Oceania and the Pacific Ocean, and to the south by Australia and the Indian Ocean. The region is the only part of Asia that lies partly within the Southern Hemisphere, although the majority of it is in the Northern Hemisphere. In contemporary definition, Southeast Asia consists of two geographic regions:

  1. Mainland Southeast Asia, also known historically as Indochina, comprising parts of Northeast India, Vietnam, Laos, Cambodia, Thailand, Myanmar, and West Malaysia.
  2. Maritime Southeast Asia, also known historically as Nusantara, the East Indies and Malay Archipelago, comprises the Andaman and Nicobar Islands of India, Indonesia, East Malaysia, Singapore, Philippines, East Timor, Brunei, Christmas Island, and the Cocos (Keeling) Islands. Taiwan is also included in this grouping by many anthropologists.
Endemism ecological state of being unique to a defined geographic location or habitat

Endemism is the ecological state of a species being unique to a defined geographic location, such as an island, nation, country or other defined zone, or habitat type; organisms that are indigenous to a place are not endemic to it if they are also found elsewhere. The extreme opposite of endemism is cosmopolitan distribution. An alternative term for a species that is endemic is precinctive, which applies to species that are restricted to a defined geographical area.

Contents

Species include:

<i>Thoressa astigmata</i> species of insect

Thoressa astigmata, the southern spotted ace, is a butterfly belonging to the family Hesperiidae. It is endemic to Western ghats and found in Kerala and Karnataka.

<i>Thoressa decorata</i> species of insect

Thoressa decorata, the decorated ace, is a butterfly belonging to the family Hesperiidae. It was first described by Frederic Moore in 1881 and is endemic to Sri Lanka in the Indomalayan realm.

<i>Thoressa evershedi</i> species of insect

Thoressa evershedi, the Evershed's ace, is a butterfly belonging to the family Hesperiidae.W. H. Evans described it from Palni Hills in 1910 and named it after Evershed as he was the first person to collect it.

Biology

The larvae feed on Gramineae including Sasa [1]

Related Research Articles

<i>Ochlodes</i> genus of insects

Ochlodes is a Holarctic genus in the skipper butterfly family, Hesperiidae. The genus is placed in the tribe Hesperiini.

<i>Celaenorrhinus</i> genus of insects

Celaenorrhinus is a genus of skipper butterflies which are commonly termed sprites. An alternate name is flats, for their habit of holding their wings flat when resting, but this is also used for related genera. They belong to the spread-winged skipper subfamily (Pyrginae), and therein are the type genus of tribe Celaenorrhini.

<i>Caltoris</i> genus of insects

Caltoris is a genus of skipper butterflies. Like several related genera, they are called "swifts".It is found in the Indomalayan realm and the Australasian realm.

<i>Ampittia</i> genus of insects

Ampittia is the genus of bush hoppers in the skipper butterfly family, Hesperiidae. It is the only member of the tribe Ampittiini, but many skipper butterflies are yet to be assigned to tribes, so this might change eventually.

<i>Cigaritis</i> Genus of butterflies

Cigaritis is a genus of butterflies in the family Lycaenidae. Its species are found in the Afrotropical realm, the Indomalayan realm and adjacent regions of Asia.

<i>Aeromachus</i> genus of insects

Aeromachus is a genus of grass skippers in the family Hesperiidae. The species are known by the common name of scrub hoppers. They are found in the eastern Palearctic and the Indomalayan ecozone.

<i>Coladenia</i> genus of insects

Coladenia is an Oriental genus of spread-winged skippers in the family Hesperiidae. They are found throughout most of Southern, Southeastern, and Eastern Asia. The genus contains the following fifteen species:

<i>Erionota</i> genus of insects

Erionota is a genus of skippers in the family Hesperiidae. It is found in the Indomalayan realm

<i>Halpe</i> genus of insects

Halpe is a genus of grass skippers in the family Hesperiidae. It is found in the Indomalayan realm

<i>Scobura</i> genus of insects

Scobura is an Indomalayan genus of grass skippers in the family Hesperiidae.

<i>Sovia</i> genus of insects

Sovia is a genus of grass skipper butterflies in the family Hesperiidae. The species are found in the Indomalayan realm The genus was erected by William Harry Evans in 1949

<i>Neope</i> genus of insects

Neope is a genus of butterflies of the family Nymphalidae found in Asia.

<i>Loxerebia</i> genus of insects

Loxerebia is a butterfly genus of the Satyrinae subfamily. The genus is confined to China, Mongolia, Burma, Thailand and Laos. Most species are endemic to China.

References

  1. Robinson, G. S., P. R. Ackery, I. J. Kitching, G. W. Beccaloni & L. M. Hernández, 2010. HOSTS - A Database of the World's Lepidopteran Hostplants. Natural History Museum, London. nhm hosts

The Consortium for the Barcode of Life (CBOL) is an international initiative dedicated to supporting the development of DNA barcoding as a global standard for species identification. CBOL's Secretariat Office is hosted by the National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution, in Washington, DC. Barcoding was proposed in 2003 by Prof. Paul Hebert of the University of Guelph in Ontario as a way of distinguishing and identifying species with a short standardized gene sequence. Hebert proposed the 648 bases of the Folmer region of the mitochondrial gene cytochrome-C oxidase-1 as the standard barcode region. Dr. Hebert is the Director of the Biodiversity Institute of Ontario, the Canadian Centre for DNA Barcoding, and the International Barcode of Life Project (iBOL), all headquartered at the University of Guelph. The Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) is also located at the University of Guelph.