Thorley Wash nature reserve

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Thorley Flood Pound
Site of Special Scientific Interest
Thorley Wash 9.JPG
Channel of the River Stort before it was canalised to become the Stort Navigation [1]
Area of Search Hertfordshire
Grid reference TL490183
InterestBiological
Area17.3 hectares
Notification 1986
Location map Magic Map
Water vole sculpture by Daniel Cordell Thorley Wash water vole sculpture.JPG
Water vole sculpture by Daniel Cordell

Thorley Wash or Thorley Flood Pound is a 17.3 hectare biological Site of Special Scientific Interest in Thorley, south of Bishop's Stortford in Hertfordshire. [3] [4] It was formerly a flood pound for the Stort Navigation, which was decommissioned in 2004 and converted to a more natural state. It was purchased by the Herts and Middlesex Wildlife Trust from the Environment Agency in 2011. [5] [6]

Site of Special Scientific Interest conservation designation denoting a protected area in the United Kingdom

A Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI) in Great Britain or an Area of Special Scientific Interest (ASSI) in the Isle of Man and Northern Ireland is a conservation designation denoting a protected area in the United Kingdom and Isle of Man. SSSI/ASSIs are the basic building block of site-based nature conservation legislation and most other legal nature/geological conservation designations in the United Kingdom are based upon them, including national nature reserves, Ramsar sites, Special Protection Areas, and Special Areas of Conservation. The acronym "SSSI" is often pronounced "triple-S I".

Thorley, Hertfordshire village in Hertfordshire

Thorley is a village and civil parish in East Hertfordshire district of Hertfordshire, England. The parish includes the hamlets of Thorley Street, Thorley Wash and Old Thorley, and is bordered at the north to the market town of Bishop's Stortford.

Bishops Stortford town in Hertfordshire, England

Bishop's Stortford is a historic English market town and civil parish in Hertfordshire, just west of the M11 motorway on the county boundary with Essex. It is the closest sizeable town to London Stansted Airport, 27 miles (43 km) north-east of Charing Cross in central London, and 35 miles (56 km) by rail from Liverpool Street station, the London terminus of the line to Cambridge that runs through the town. Bishop's Stortford had a population of 38,202 in 2001, easing to 37,838 at the 2011 Census.

Habitats include tall wash grassland, which is now rare, marsh and waterlogged grassland. It has a wide variety of plant species, including reed sweet-grass and meadowsweet. There are flowers such as fen bedstraw and early marsh orchid. Breeding birds include snipe and water rails. [3] The site also has the endangered Desmoulin's whorl snail, which is in the Red Date Book, together with diverse dragonflies, damselflies, birds, bats, small mammals and reptiles. [5]

<i>Galium uliginosum</i> species of plant

Galium uliginosum or fen bedstraw is a plant species of the genus Galium. It is widespread across most of Europe as well as Morocco, Western Siberia, Turkey, Kazakhstan and Xinjiang. It is reportedly naturalized in New Zealand, Greenland and the Crozet Islands.

Desmoulins whorl snail species of mollusc

Desmoulin's whorl snail is a species of minute air-breathing land snail, a terrestrial pulmonate gastropod mollusc or micromollusc in the family Vertiginidae, the whorl snails.

IUCN Red List inventory of the global conservation status of biological species

The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species, founded in 1965, has evolved to become the world's most comprehensive inventory of the global conservation status of biological species. It uses a set of criteria to evaluate the extinction risk of thousands of species and subspecies. These criteria are relevant to all species and all regions of the world, With its strong scientific base, the IUCN Red List is recognized as the most authoritative guide to the status of biological diversity. A series of Regional Red List are produced by countries or organizations, which assess the risk of extinction to species within a political management unit.

There are five wooden sculptures by Daniel Cordell, commissioned by the Wildlife Trust in 2012. [2]

The Stort Navigation forms the boundary between Hertfordshire and Essex, and the site is on the Hertfordshire bank, but access is by a bridge from the towpath on the eastern Essex side. Access is restricted to footpaths due to the dangerous deep silt on the site.

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References

  1. Thorley Wash Nature Reserve, leaflet published by the Herts and Middlesex Wildlife Trust
  2. 1 2 "Thorley Wash Nature reserve". Daniel Cordell. Retrieved 11 March 2015.
  3. 1 2 "Thorley Flood Pound citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 11 March 2015.
  4. "Map of Thorley Flood Pound". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 11 March 2015.
  5. 1 2 "Thorley Wash". Herts and Middlesex Wildlife Trust. Retrieved 11 March 2015.
  6. Lester, Ahren (28 February 2011). "Herts and Middlesex Wildlife Trust Secure Thorley Wash Site for Public". Bishop's Stortford Town Ward Times.

Coordinates: 51°50′36″N0°09′41″E / 51.8434°N 0.1615°E / 51.8434; 0.1615

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