Tibetan astrology

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Tibetan astrology (Tibetan : དཀར་རྩིས, Wylie : dkar rtsis) is a traditional discipline of the Tibetan peoples that has influence from both Chinese astrology and Hindu astrology. Tibetan astrology is one of the 'Ten Sciences' (Wylie: rig-pa'i gnas bcu; Sanskrit: daśavidyā) in the enumeration honoured by this cultural tradition. [1]

Contents

In the Tibetan Buddhist medical and tantric traditions, astrology is not regarded as superstition but rather as a practical tool to understand and heal our body and mind on the gross, subtle and very subtle levels. One can experience many sicknesses and misfortunes due to outer, inner and secret astrological reactions and malevolent celestial influences. [2]

Year-signs

The Year-signs cycle in an archetypal progression or continuüm:

Tibetan Astrological Animal Sign & Element

Source: https://kunpen.ngalso.org/
YearAnimalElementStart Date
1912MouseWater21-Dec-1911
1913OxWater9-Dec-1912
1914TigerWood28-Dec-1913
1915RabbitWood17-Dec-1914
1916DragonFire7-Dec-1915
1917SnakeFire25-Dec-1916
1918HorseEarth15-Dec-1917
1919SheepEarth4-Dec-1918
1920MonkeyIron23-Dec-1919
1921BirdIron11-Dec-1920
1922DogWater30-Dec-1921
1923BoarWater19-Dec-1922
1924MouseWood8-Dec-1923
1925OxWood26-Dec-1924
1926TigerFire16-Dec-1925
1927RabbitFire6-Dec-1926
1928DragonEarth24-Dec-1927
1929SnakeEarth12-Dec-1928
1930HorseIron31-Dec-1929
1931SheepIron20-Dec-1930
1932MonkeyWater10-Dec-1931
1933BirdWater28-Dec-1932
1934DogWood18-Dec-1933
1935BoarWood7-Dec-1934
1936MouseFire26-Dec-1935
1937OxFire14-Dec-1936
1938TigerEarth2-Jan-1938
1939RabbitEarth22-Dec-1938
1940DragonIron11-Dec-1939
1941SnakeIron29-Dec-1940
1942HorseWater19-Dec-1941
1943SheepWater8-Dec-1942
1944MonkeyWood28-Dec-1943
1945BirdWood16-Dec-1944
1946DogFire5-Dec-1945
1947BoarFire24-Dec-1946
1948MouseEarth13-Dec-1947
1949OxEarth31-Dec-1948
1950TigerIron20-Dec-1949
1951RabbitIron10-Dec-1950
1952DragonWater29-Dec-1951
1953SnakeWater17-Dec-1952
1954HorseWood7-Dec-1953
1955SheepWood26-Dec-1954
1956MonkeyFire15-Dec-1955
1957BirdFire1-Jan-1957
1958DogEarth22-Dec-1957
1959BoarEarth11-Dec-1958
1960MouseIron30-Dec-1959
1961OxIron19-Dec-1960
1962TigerWater8-Dec-1961
1963RabbitWater27-Dec-1962
1964DragonWood16-Dec-1963
1965SnakeWood4-Dec-1964
1966HorseFire23-Dec-1965
1967SheepFire12-Dec-1966
1968MonkeyEarth31-Dec-1967
1969BirdEarth20-Dec-1968
1970DogIron10-Dec-1969
1971BoarIron29-Dec-1970
1972MouseWater18-Dec-1971
1973OxWater6-Dec-1972
1974TigerWood25-Dec-1973
1975RabbitWood14-Dec-1974
1976DragonFire2-Jan-1976
1977SnakeFire21-Dec-1976
1978HorseEarth11-Dec-1977
1979SheepEarth30-Dec-1978
1980MonkeyIron20-Dec-1979
1981BirdIron8-Dec-1980
1982DogWater27-Dec-1981
1983BoarWater16-Dec-1982
1984MouseWood4-Jan-1984
1985OxWood23-Dec-1984
1986TigerFire12-Dec-1985
1987RabbitFire1-Jan-1987
1988DragonEarth21-Dec-1987
1989SnakeEarth10-Dec-1988
1990HorseIron28-Dec-1989
1991SheepIron18-Dec-1990
1992MonkeyWater7-Dec-1991
1993BirdWater24-Dec-1992
1994DogWood14-Dec-1993
1995BoarWood2-Jan-1995
1996MouseFire22-Dec-1995
1997OxFire11-Dec-1996
1998TigerEarth30-Dec-1997
1999RabbitEarth19-Dec-1998
2000DragonIron8-Dec-1999
2001SnakeIron26-Dec-2000
2002HorseWater15-Dec-2001
2003SheepWater3-Jan-2003
2004MonkeyWood24-Dec-2003
2005BirdWood13-Dec-2004
2006DogFire1-Jan-2006
2007BoarFire21-Dec-2006
2008MouseEarth10-Dec-2007
2009OxEarth8-Jan-2008
2010TigerIron
2011RabbitIron
2012DragonWater
2013SnakeWater
2014HorseWood
2015SheepWood
2016MonkeyFire
2017BirdFire
2018DogEarth
2019BoarEarth
2020MouseIron
* Note: The start date of Losar depends on what time zone one is in. For example, in 2005, Losar started on February 8 in U.S. time zones and February 9 in Asia time zones. Some people began celebrating Losar on February 9 in the US. The Tibetan new year is based on a fluctuating point that marks the New Moon that is nearest to the beginning of February. It is important to note that, despite their apparent similarities, the start of the Tibetan and Chinese New Years can sometimes differ by a whole month.


Favourable & Non Favourable Day by Animal Sign

This calendar is based on Tibetan Astrology and is calculated for midday in European Std Time ( GMT+2)

Table below show the days of the weeks (and corresponding planets) that are considered generally favourable or not favourable for the 12 Tibetan astrological signs. [5]

For the start of new or important activities it is advisable to avoid the unfavourable week days in the calendar.

Animal SignFavourableNon Favourable
MouseWednesday (Mercury)Saturday (Saturn)
OxSaturday (Saturn)Thursday (Jupiter)
TigerThursday (Jupiter)Friday (Venus)
RabbitThursday (Jupiter)Friday (Venus)
DragonSunday (Sun)Thursday (Jupiter)
SnakeTuesday (Mars)Wednesday (Mercury)
HorseTuesday (Mars)Wednesday (Mercury)
SheepFriday (Venus)Thursday (Jupiter)
MonkeyFriday (Venus)Tuesday (Mars)
BirdFriday (Venus)Tuesday (Mars)
DogMonday (Moon)Thursday (Jupiter)
BoarWednesday (Mercury)Saturday (Saturn)

Vaiḍūrya dKar-po (White Beryl)

The names of the chapters of the Vaiḍūrya dKar-po (the premier Tibetan text on astrological divination) are :

See also

Notes

  1. Dudjom Rinpoche and Jikdrel Yeshe Dorje. The Nyingma School of Tibetan Buddhism: its Fundamentals and History. Two Volumes. 1991. Translated and edited by Gyurme Dorje with Matthew Kapstein. Wisdom Publications, Boston. ISBN   0-86171-087-8; Enumerations p.167
  2. "Self-Healing II – NgalSo – LGPP" . Retrieved 2022-08-29.
  3. "Tibetan Astrology – Table of Year-Animal-Element | Albagnano Healing Meditation Centre". ahmc.ngalso.net. Archived from the original on 2014-11-11.
  4. "Tibetan Astrology – Table of Year-Animal-Element | Albagnano Healing Meditation Centre". ahmc.ngalso.net. Archived from the original on 2014-11-11.
  5. "Tibetan Astrology – Calendar Introduction | Kunpen Lama Gangchen - NgalSo Dharma Centre". kunpen.ngalso.org. Retrieved 2022-08-29.

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