Tiles of the Dragon

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Tiles of the Dragon
Tiles of the Dragon Title.png
Title screen
Developer(s) id Software
Publisher(s) Softdisk
Director(s) Tom Hall
Programmer(s) Jason Blochowiak
Artist(s) Adrian Carmack
Platform(s) DOS
Release 1993
Genre(s) Mahjong solitaire
Mode(s) Single-player

Tiles of the Dragon is a 1993 mahjong solitaire video game for DOS developed by id Software and published by Softdisk. It is one of eleven games id Software created for Softdisk, who paid $5000 for it as part of id Software's contractual obligation to them. [1] Tiles of the Dragon was later included by Softdisk as part of "The Lost Game Collection of ID Software." [2]

Contents

Gameplay

Like Mahjong Solitaire itself, the object of the game is to remove as many tiles from the board as possible. Two tiles that are on top can be selected and any matching pairs will be removed from the board. The game has two modes: Solitary and Tournament. The Tournament mode has a time limit for an increased difficulty.

Development

Tiles of the Dragon was created as a Mahjong clone to buy id Software more time to continue with their own projects. [3]

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References

  1. John Romero (February 1, 2011). "id Software: 20 Years Old Today!". Squarespace . Retrieved December 12, 2017.
  2. Fahs, Travis (1992). "Gamer's Edge Electronic Catalog - Volume 1". Softdisk . Retrieved December 12, 2017.
  3. "The Early Years of id Software". IGN. September 23, 2008. Retrieved December 12, 2017.