Timeline of battleships of the United States Navy

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This is a bar graph showing a Timeline of battleships of the United States Navy. The ships are listed in order of hull number.

Contents

Notes

In general, labels for ships of a single class are aligned vertically with the topmost ship in a column carrying the class name.

In an attempt to show the full timeline of the actual existence of each ship, the final dates on each bar may variously be the date struck, sold, scrapped, scuttled, sunk as a reef, etc., as appropriate to show last time it existed as a floating object.

Timeline

USS Wisconsin (BB-64)USS Missouri (BB-63)USS New Jersey (BB-62)USS Iowa (BB-61)USS Alabama (BB-60)USS Massachusetts (BB-59)USS Indiana (BB-58)USS South Dakota (BB-57)USS Washington (BB-56)USS North Carolina (BB-55)USS West Virginia (BB-48)USS Washington (BB-47)USS Maryland (BB-46)USS Colorado (BB-45)USS California (BB-44)USS Tennessee (BB-43)USS Idaho (BB-42)USS Mississippi (BB-41)USS New Mexico (BB-40)USS Arizona (BB-39)USS Pennsylvania (BB-38)USS Oklahoma (BB-37)USS Nevada (BB-36)USS Texas (BB-35)USS New York (BB-34)USS Arkansas (BB-33)USS Wyoming (BB-32)USS Utah (BB-31)USS Florida (BB-30)USS North Dakota (BB-29)USS Delaware (BB-28)USS Michigan (BB-27)USS South Carolina (BB-26)USS New Hampshire (BB-25))Greek battleship LemnosUSS Idaho (BB-24)Greek battleship KilkisUSS Mississippi (BB-23)USS Minnesota (BB-22)USS Kansas (BB-21)USS Vermont (BB-20)USS Louisiana (BB-19)USS Connecticut (BB-18))USS Rhode Island (BB-17)USS New Jersey (BB-16)USS Georgia (BB-15)USS Nebraska (BB-14)USS Virginia (BB-13)USS Ohio (BB-12)USS Missouri (BB-11)USS Maine (BB-10)USS Wisconsin (BB-9)USS Alabama (BB-8)USS Illinois (BB-7)USS Kentucky (BB-6)USS Kearsarge (BB-5)USS Iowa (BB-4)USS Oregon (BB-3)USS Massachusetts (BB-2)USS Indiana (BB-1)USS Maine (ACR-1)USS Texas (1892)Timeline of battleships of the United States Navy

See also

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References