Tunbridge (UK Parliament constituency)

Last updated

Tunbridge
Former County constituency
for the House of Commons
18851918
Number of membersone
Created from Mid Kent

Tunbridge was a parliamentary constituency in Kent, centred on the town of Tonbridge. It returned one Member of Parliament (MP) to the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom.

United Kingdom constituencies electoral area in the UK (do not use in P31; use subclasses of this instead)

In the United Kingdom (UK), each of the electoral areas or divisions called constituencies elects one member to the House of Commons.

Kent County of England

Kent is a county in South East England and one of the home counties. It borders Greater London to the north-west, Surrey to the west and East Sussex to the south-west. The county also shares borders with Essex along the estuary of the River Thames, and with the French department of Pas-de-Calais through the Channel Tunnel. The county town is Maidstone.

Tonbridge Market town in Kent, England

Tonbridge is a market town in Kent, England, on the River Medway, 4 miles (6 km) north of Royal Tunbridge Wells, 12 miles (19 km) south west of Maidstone and 29 miles (47 km) south east of London. In the administrative borough of Tonbridge and Malling, it had a population of 40,356 in 2015.

Contents

It was created for the 1885 general election, and abolished for the 1918 general election, when it was replaced by the new Tonbridge constituency.

1885 United Kingdom general election nationwide election to the House of Commons

The 1885 United Kingdom general election was held from 24 November to 18 December 1885. This was the first general election after an extension of the franchise and redistribution of seats. For the first time a majority of adult males could vote and most constituencies by law returned a single member to Parliament fulfilling one of the ideals of Chartism to provide direct single-member, single-electorate accountability. It saw the Liberals, led by William Ewart Gladstone, win the most seats, but not an overall majority. As the Irish Nationalists held the balance of power between them and the Conservatives who sat with an increasing number of allied Unionist MPs, this exacerbated divisions within the Liberals over Irish Home Rule and led to a Liberal split and another general election the following year.

1918 United Kingdom general election

The 1918 United Kingdom general election was called immediately after the Armistice with Germany which ended the First World War, and was held on Saturday, 14 December 1918. The governing coalition, under Prime Minister David Lloyd George, sent letters of endorsement to candidates who supported the coalition government. These were nicknamed "Coalition Coupons", and led to the election being known as the "coupon election". The result was a massive landslide in favour of the coalition, comprising primarily the Conservatives and Coalition Liberals, with massive losses for Liberals who were not endorsed. Nearly all the Liberal MPs without coupons were defeated, although party leader H. H. Asquith managed to return to Parliament in a by-election.

Tonbridge was a parliamentary constituency in Kent, centred on the town of Tonbridge. It returned one Member of Parliament to the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom.

Boundaries

The Sessional Divisions of Tunbridge and Tunbridge Wells, and part of the Sessional Division of Malling.

Members of Parliament

ElectionMemberParty
1885 Robert Norton Conservative
1892 Arthur Griffith-Boscawen Conservative
1906 Alfred Paget Hedges Liberal
1910 Herbert Spender-Clay Conservative
1918 constituency abolished: see Tonbridge

Elections

Elections in the 1880s

Verney 1898 Frederick Verney.jpg
Verney
General election 1885: Tunbridge [1]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Conservative Robert Norton 4,53351.8N/A
Liberal Frederick Verney 4,21048.2N/A
Majority3233.6N/A
Turnout 8,74381.7N/A
Registered electors 10,703
Conservative win (new seat)
General election 1886: Tunbridge [1]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Conservative Robert Norton Unopposed
Conservative hold

Elections in the 1890s

Frederick Pavy Frederick William Pavy.jpg
Frederick Pavy
General election 1892: Tunbridge [1]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Conservative Arthur Griffith-Boscawen 4,82155.4N/A
Liberal Frederick William Pavy 3,88844.6N/A
Majority93310.8N/A
Turnout 8,70969.7N/A
Registered electors 12,494
Conservative hold Swing N/A
General election 1895: Tunbridge [1]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Conservative Arthur Griffith-Boscawen Unopposed
Conservative hold

Elections in the 1900s

Griffith-Boscawen Arthur Griffith-Boscawen Westminster1899.jpg
Griffith-Boscawen
General election 1900: Tunbridge [1]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Conservative Arthur Griffith-Boscawen 5,57661.5N/A
Liberal C Cory3,49438.5N/A
Majority2,08223.0N/A
Turnout 9,07067.1N/A
Registered electors 13,519
Conservative hold Swing N/A
Alfred Hedges Alfred Paget Hedges.jpg
Alfred Hedges
General election 1906: Tunbridge [1]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Liberal Alfred Paget Hedges 7,17054.9+16.4
Conservative Arthur Griffith-Boscawen 5,88745.116.4
Majority1,2839.8N/A
Turnout 13,05784.2+17.1
Registered electors 15,500
Liberal gain from Conservative Swing +16.4

Elections in the 1910s

General election January 1910: Tunbridge [1]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Conservative Herbert Spender-Clay 9,24060.5+15.4
Liberal Alfred Paget Hedges 6,03039.5-15.4
Majority3,21021.030.8
Turnout 89.2+5.0
Conservative gain from Liberal Swing +15.4
General election December 1910: Tunbridge [1]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Conservative Herbert Spender-Clay 8,28657.4
Liberal Alfred Paget Hedges 6,15942.6
Majority2,12714.8
Turnout 84.4
Conservative hold Swing

General Election 1914/15:

Another General Election was required to take place before the end of 1915. The political parties had been making preparations for an election to take place and by the July 1914, the following candidates had been selected;

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References

  1. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Craig, F. W. S., ed. (1974). British Parliamentary Election Results: 1885-1918. London: Macmillan Press. p. 309. ISBN   9781349022984.