Young, New South Wales

Last updated

Young
New South Wales
YoungCourthouse.JPG
Young courthouse built in 1884 but transferred to the Department of Education in 1925 and used as the main hall of Young High School
Australia New South Wales relief location map.png
Red pog.svg
Young
Coordinates 34°18′0″S148°18′0″E / 34.30000°S 148.30000°E / -34.30000; 148.30000 Coordinates: 34°18′0″S148°18′0″E / 34.30000°S 148.30000°E / -34.30000; 148.30000
Population7,170 (2016 census) [1]
Established1826
Postcode(s) 2594
Elevation439 m (1,440 ft)
Location
LGA(s) Hilltops Council
State electorate(s) Cootamundra
Federal Division(s) Riverina
Mean max tempMean min tempAnnual rainfall
22.2 °C
72 °F
7.0 °C
45 °F
589.7 mm
23.2 in

Young is a town in the South West Slopes region of New South Wales, Australia and the largest town in the Hilltops Region. The "Lambing Flat" Post Office opened on 1 March 1861 and was renamed "Young" in 1863. [2]

New South Wales State of Australia

New South Wales is a state on the east coast of Australia. It borders Queensland to the north, Victoria to the south, and South Australia to the west. Its coast borders the Tasman Sea to the east. The Australian Capital Territory is an enclave within the state. New South Wales' state capital is Sydney, which is also Australia's most populous city. In March 2019, the population of New South Wales was over 8 million, making it Australia's most populous state. Just under two-thirds of the state's population, 5.1 million, live in the Greater Sydney area. Inhabitants of New South Wales are referred to as New South Welshmen.

Australia Country in Oceania

Australia, officially the Commonwealth of Australia, is a sovereign country comprising the mainland of the Australian continent, the island of Tasmania, and numerous smaller islands. It is the largest country in Oceania and the world's sixth-largest country by total area. The neighbouring countries are Papua New Guinea, Indonesia, and East Timor to the north; the Solomon Islands and Vanuatu to the north-east; and New Zealand to the south-east. The population of 26 million is highly urbanised and heavily concentrated on the eastern seaboard. Australia's capital is Canberra, and its largest city is Sydney. The country's other major metropolitan areas are Melbourne, Brisbane, Perth, and Adelaide.

Hilltops Council Local government area in New South Wales, Australia

Hilltops Council is a local government area in the South West Slopes region of New South Wales, Australia. This area was formed on the 12 May 2016 from the merger of Boorowa Council, Harden Shire and Young Shire. The local government area covers much the same area as the Hilltops wine region.

Contents

Young is marketed as the Cherry Capital of Australia and every year hosts the National Cherry Festival. Young is situated on the Olympic Highway and is approximately 2 hours drive from the Canberra area. It is in a valley, with surrounding hills. The town is named after Sir John Young, the governor of NSW from 1861 to 1867. [3] [4]

Olympic Highway highway in New South Wales

The Olympic Highway is a rural road in the central western and south-eastern Riverina regions of New South Wales, Australia. The 318-kilometre (198 mi) highway services rural communities and links the Hume Highway with the Mid-Western Highway and provides part of an alternate road link between Sydney and Albury via Bathurst and Cowra as well as servicing Wagga Wagga, linking with the Sturt Highway.

Canberra capital city of Australia

Canberra is the capital city of Australia. Founded following the federation of the colonies of Australia as the seat of government for the new nation, it is Australia's largest inland city and the eighth-largest city overall. The city is located at the northern end of the Australian Capital Territory; 280 km (170 mi) south-west of Sydney and 660 km (410 mi) north-east of Melbourne.

John Young, 1st Baron Lisgar Irish politician

John Young, 1st Baron Lisgar was a British diplomat and politician. He served as the second Governor General of Canada (1869–72), the 12th Governor of New South Wales (1861–67) and as Chief Secretary for Ireland (1853–55). From 1848 to 1870 he was known as Sir John Young, 2nd Baronet.

History

Brass breast plate presented to the Aboriginal leader Coborn Jackey of the Burrowmunditory tribe by the squatter James White. The artifact is held in the museum at Young. BreastplateCobornJackey.jpg
Brass breast plate presented to the Aboriginal leader Coborn Jackey of the Burrowmunditory tribe by the squatter James White. The artifact is held in the museum at Young.
St John the Evangelist's Anglican Church Young- Church-1+ (2146227780).jpg
St John the Evangelist's Anglican Church

Before European settlers arrived in Young, members of the Burrowmunditory tribe, a family group of the indigenous Wiradjuri Nation, lived in the region. [6] Descendants of the Burrowmunditory clan still live in Young. [7]

Indigenous Australians are the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples of Australia, descended from groups that existed in Australia and surrounding islands before British colonisation. The time of arrival of the first Indigenous peoples on the continent and nearby islands is a matter of debate among researchers. The earliest conclusively human remains found in Australia are those of Mungo Man LM3 and Mungo Lady, which have been dated to around 50,000 years BP. Recent archaeological evidence from the analysis of charcoal and artefacts revealing human use suggests a date as early as 65,000 BP. Luminescence dating has suggested habitation in Arnhem Land as far back as 60,000 years BP. Evidence of fires in South-West Australia suggest 'human presence in Australia 120,000 years ago', although more research is required. Genetic research has inferred a date of habitation as early as 80,000 years BP. Other estimates have ranged up to 100,000 years and 125,000 years BP.

The Wiradjuri people are a group of Indigenous Australian Aboriginal people that were united by a common language, strong ties of kinship and survived as skilled hunter–fisher–gatherers in family groups or clans scattered throughout central New South Wales.

James White was the first European settler in the district and established Burrangong Station in 1826 with a squatting claim of 260 square kilometres (100 sq mi). [5] [6] His story is told in the novel Brothers in Exile. Gold was found in the district in 1860. Until that time the area was called Lambing Flat, a reference to the grazing of sheep that was the main industry until mining. The town was gazetted in 1861. The goldfields produced 15,000 kilograms (470,000 ozt) of gold sent by escort from the fields. Up to 20,000 miners worked the fields including about 2,000 Chinese miners. [6]

From November 1860 through to June 1861, anti-Chinese miners attacked Chinese gold miners in the area, now known as the infamous Lambing Flat riots. As gold became scarce, European miners began to resent what they saw as the greater success of the more industrious Chinese, and hence many Chinese miners were attacked, robbed and killed. The anti-Chinese rebels rallied in numbers of up to 3,000. Eventually the rioters were controlled, Chinese miners had their claims restored to them, but the New South Wales Parliament passed the Chinese Immigration Bill which restricted the number of Chinese that could be brought into New South Wales on any ship and imposed a tax per head on entry.

Lambing Flat riots series of violent anti-Chinese demonstrations in Australia

The Lambing Flat Riots (1860-1861) were a series of violent anti-Chinese demonstrations that took place in the Burrangong region, in New South Wales, Australia. They occurred on the goldfields at Spring Creek, Stoney Creek, Back Creek, Wombat, Blackguard Gully, Tipperary Gully, and Lambing Flat.

In 1889 Young was the first town in Australia to install electricity into the streets and homes of the township; Tamworth NSW had installed electricity to the streets only the previous year.

The former Young Shire was acknowledged as the first Local Government Area to institute a rural school bus system in New South Wales. [6]

Young Shire Local government area in New South Wales, Australia

Young Shire was a local government area in the South West Slopes region of New South Wales, Australia. The Shire was located adjacent to the Olympic Highway.

Heritage listings

Young has a number of heritage-listed sites, including:

Climate

Young has a humid subtropical climate (Cfa)[ citation needed ], with marked continental influence. Snow falls occasionally; notwithstanding its fairly low elevation of approximately 400 m, the far inland position of Young within Western New South Wales exposes it to strong south-westerly frontal outbreaks, chiefly from May to September. Hence, places such as Canberra farther east (but higher up) receive less snowfall than Young due to more adequate sheltering from these fronts. Owing to Young's far inland location, it also yields hot, dry, stormy summers and a distinctly "continental" climate of the South West Slopes region. [11]

Climate data for Young, NSW (Young Airport [>1988]); 380 m AMSL; 34° 14' 57.48" S
MonthJanFebMarAprMayJunJulAugSepOctNovDecYear
Record high °C (°F)43.5
(110.3)
43.0
(109.4)
38.6
(101.5)
32.6
(90.7)
25.4
(77.7)
21.9
(71.4)
19.9
(67.8)
23.6
(74.5)
30.8
(87.4)
34.4
(93.9)
42.1
(107.8)
41.1
(106.0)
43.5
(110.3)
Average high °C (°F)31.8
(89.2)
30.5
(86.9)
27.2
(81.0)
22.7
(72.9)
17.8
(64.0)
13.9
(57.0)
12.8
(55.0)
14.6
(58.3)
17.9
(64.2)
22.1
(71.8)
26.1
(79.0)
29.2
(84.6)
22.2
(72.0)
Average low °C (°F)14.7
(58.5)
14.7
(58.5)
11.3
(52.3)
6.6
(43.9)
3.3
(37.9)
2.3
(36.1)
0.9
(33.6)
1.3
(34.3)
3.0
(37.4)
5.3
(41.5)
9.3
(48.7)
11.9
(53.4)
7.1
(44.7)
Record low °C (°F)1.4
(34.5)
2.3
(36.1)
0.4
(32.7)
−4.1
(24.6)
−5.8
(21.6)
−6.1
(21.0)
−7.0
(19.4)
−6.5
(20.3)
−5.5
(22.1)
−4.7
(23.5)
−2.4
(27.7)
−0.2
(31.6)
−7.0
(19.4)
Average precipitation mm (inches)40.7
(1.60)
50.6
(1.99)
46.6
(1.83)
31.7
(1.25)
40.5
(1.59)
61.6
(2.43)
59.7
(2.35)
51.1
(2.01)
52.4
(2.06)
45.6
(1.80)
64.0
(2.52)
57.9
(2.28)
602.4
(23.71)
Average precipitation days6.97.36.85.79.814.717.514.811.39.18.57.2119.6
Average afternoon relative humidity (%)31343540516363555144383145
Source: [12]

Demographics

On 2016 census night, 9 August 2016, there were 7,170 people (3,385 males and 3,783 females) counted in Young. There were 367 people (5.1%) (197 males and 172 females) who identified as being of Indigenous origin. The median age of people was 40 years. [1]

The number of people born overseas in the 2016 Census was 1023 (13.9%) compared with 650 (5.8%) in the 2001 Census, 589 (5.3%) in the 1996 Census and 549 (5.1%) in the 1991 Census. Of those born overseas, the three main countries of birth in the 2016 Census were:

In the 2016 Census, the three most common ancestries identified with were:

English was stated as the only language spoken at home by 6,413 people (89.6%) in the 2016 Census. The three most common languages spoken at home other than English in the 2016 Census were:

In the week preceding the 2016 Census, 1894 households (67.8%) had accessed the internet at home. 501 (8.9%) people held a bachelor's degree or above. 212 people were unemployed, representing 7.6% of the labour force. The median weekly individual income for people aged 15 years and over in the 2016 Census was $505. In the 2016 Census, there were 2,324 separate houses (83.2%), 202 semi-detached, row or terrace houses and townhouses (7.2%), 257 flats, units or apartments (9.2%) and 3 other dwellings (0.1%). In the 2016 Census, there were 594 couple families with children (which comprised 34.4% of all families in occupied private dwellings), 675 couple families without children (39.1%), 431 one parent families (24.9%) and 28 other families (1.6%).

The Lambing Flat Chinese Tribute Gardens

The Roll Up banner around which a mob of about 1,000 men rallied and attacked Chinese miners at Lambing Flat in June 1861. The banner is now on display in the museum at Young. LambingFlatRollUpBanner reworked.jpg
The Roll Up banner around which a mob of about 1,000 men rallied and attacked Chinese miners at Lambing Flat in June 1861. The banner is now on display in the museum at Young.

Young Shire Council established the Lambing Flat Chinese Tribute Gardens adjacent to the site of Chinamans Dam, an old railway dam approximately 4 kilometres (2.5 mi) south of Young. The gardens are intended to create an ambience similar to the Japanese Gardens at Cowra. Chinamans Dam, with an initial capacity of over 9,100 cubic metres (2×10^6 imp gal) when it was in railway use, is situated at a hamlet called Pitstone on Sawpit Gully. The dam was built in the 1860s by Dutch brothers, Herman and John Tiedemann, to provide water for the sluicing of their Victoria Hill gold claims. At some time in the 1870s, the brothers sold the area, including the dam, to a Chinese group who worked the site. [13]

The dam was used as a railway facility from 1882 when the NSW Railway Commissioners gave notice of the intention to build the first part of the Blayney-Demondrille railway. To provide water for its steam locomotives, the Commissioners decided to provide a dam and pump water from it to a facility, known as Young Tank, at the 396-kilometre (246 mi) post. It is not known whether the railways enhanced the existing dam or built a new facility. [13]

From 1885 to 1901, locomotives stopped at Young Tank to replenish their water. In 1901, watering facilities were built at Young Station. The supply of water was obtained from Chinamans Dam. The capacity of the dam was enlarged in 1911. The dam was a popular spot for swimming and, whilst officially frowned upon, was tolerated. [13]

Following the connection to the South West Tablelands Water Supply Scheme, which provided water from Burrinjuck Dam, the railways ceased to draw water from Chinamans Dam after 1936. The site was returned to the Crown in 1962 and in the following year, a 15-hectare (36-acre) reserve was established and the Shire Council were appointed as trustees. The dam has since been enlarged. [13]

Education

Young has six schools:

Sport

The town's rugby league team competed for the Maher Cup.

Media

Newspapers

Radio stations

Notable people

Related Research Articles

Cobar Town in New South Wales, Australia

Cobar is a town in central western New South Wales, Australia whose economy is based mainly upon base metals and gold mining. The town is 712 km (442 mi) by road northwest of the state capital, Sydney. It is at the crossroads of the Kidman Way and Barrier Highway. The town and the local government area, the Cobar Shire, are on the eastern edge of the outback. At the 2016 census, the town of Cobar had a population of 3,990. The Shire has a population of approximately 4,700 and an area of 44,065 square kilometres (17,014 sq mi).

Queanbeyan City in New South Wales, Australia

Queanbeyan is a city in south-eastern region of the Australian state of New South Wales, located adjacent to the Australian Capital Territory in the Southern Tablelands region. Located on the Queanbeyan River, the city is the council seat of the Queanbeyan-Palerang Regional Council. At the 2016 census, the Queanbeyan part of the Canberra–Queanbeyan built-up area had a population of 36,348.

Wellington, New South Wales Town in New South Wales, Australia

Wellington is a town in inland New South Wales, Australia, located at the junction of the Macquarie and Bell Rivers. It is within the local government area of Dubbo Regional Council. The town is 362 kilometres (225 mi) from Sydney on the Great Western Highway and Mitchell Highway.

Forbes, New South Wales Town in New South Wales, Australia

Forbes is a town in the Central West region of New South Wales, Australia, located on the Newell Highway between Parkes and West Wyalong. At the 2016 census, Forbes had a population of 8,432. Forbes is probably named after Sir Francis Forbes, first Chief Justice of NSW.

Narrandera Town in New South Wales, Australia

Narrandera until around 1949 also spelled "Narandera", is a town located in the Riverina region of southern New South Wales, Australia. The town lies on the junction of the Newell and Sturt highways, adjacent to the Murrumbidgee River, and it is considered the gateway to the Murrumbidgee Irrigation Area. At the 2016 census, Narrandera had a population of 3,746 people.

Cooma Town in New South Wales, Australia

Cooma is a town in the south of New South Wales, Australia. It is located 114 kilometres (71 mi) south of the national capital, Canberra, via the Monaro Highway. It is also on the Snowy Mountains Highway, connecting Bega with the Riverina.

Cowra Town in New South Wales, Australia

Cowra is a small town in the Central West region of New South Wales, Australia. It is the largest population centre and the council seat for the Cowra Shire, with a population of 10,063.

Gunnedah Town in New South Wales, Australia

Gunnedah is a town in north-eastern New South Wales, Australia and is the seat of the Gunnedah Shire local government area. In the 2016 census the town recorded a population of 9,726. Gunnedah is situated within the Liverpool Plains, a fertile agricultural region, with 80% of the surrounding shire area devoted to farming. The Namoi River flows west then north-west through the town providing water beneficial to agricultural operations in the area.

Boggabri Town in New South Wales, Australia

Boggabri is a small town in north-western New South Wales, Australia. It is part of Narrabri Shire and lies between Gunnedah and Narrabri on the Kamilaroi Highway. At the 2016 census, the town had a population of 856 people.

Mullumbimby Town in New South Wales, Australia

Mullumbimby is an Australian town in the Byron Shire in the Northern Rivers region of New South Wales. It promotes itself as "The Biggest Little Town in Australia". The town lies at the foot of Mount Chincogan in the Brunswick Valley about 9 kilometres by road from the coast. At the 2016 census, Mullumbimby and the surrounding area had a population of 3,596 people. Locals refer to the town as "Mullum".

Alexandria, New South Wales Suburb of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia

Alexandria is an inner-city suburb of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. Alexandria is located 4 kilometres south of the Sydney central business district and is part of the local government area of the City of Sydney. The postcode is 2015.

Grenfell, New South Wales Town in New South Wales, Australia

Grenfell is a town in Weddin Shire in the Central West of New South Wales, Australia. It is 370 km (230 mi) west of Sydney. It is close to Forbes, Cowra and Young. At the 2011 census, Grenfell had a population of 1,996. The town is served daily by connecting NSW TrainLink services from Sydney via Bathurst and Lithgow. Grenfell is approximately 5 hours from Sydney and 2 1/2 hours from Canberra.

North Parramatta Suburb of City of Parramatta, New South Wales, Australia

North Parramatta is a suburb of the City of Parramatta, in the state of New South Wales, Australia 24 kilometres north-west of the Sydney central business district in the local government area of the City of Parramatta.

Tingha, New South Wales Town in New South Wales, Australia

Tingha is a small town on the Northern Tablelands, New South Wales, Australia in Inverell Shire. Formerly part of Armidale Region, on 1 July 2019, responsibility for Tingha was transferred from Armidale Regional Council to Inverell Shire Council. The town is 30 kilometres (19 mi) south of Inverell and 629 kilometres (391 mi) north-north-east of Sydney. Tingha is an Aboriginal word for "flat or level".

Burrinjuck Dam dam in Burrinjuck, South West Slopes, New South Wales

Burrinjuck Dam is a heritage-listed major gated concrete-walled gravity dam hydro-electric dam at Burrinjuck, Yass Valley Shire, New South Wales, Australia. It has three spillways across the Murrumbidgee River located in the South West Slopes region of New South Wales, Australia. The dam's purpose includes flood mitigation, hydro-power, irrigation, water supply and conservation. The impounded reservoir is called Lake Burrinjuck. It was designed by L.A.B. Wade and built from 1907 to 1927 by Lane & Peters, Sydney. It is also known as Barren Jack Dam and Barrenjack. The property is owned by Department of Planning and Infrastructure. It was added to the New South Wales State Heritage Register on 2 April 1999.

Wollondilly Shire Local government area in New South Wales, Australia

Wollondilly Shire is a periurban local government area adjacent to the south-western fringe of Sydney, parts of which fall into the Macarthur, Blue Mountains and Central Tablelands regions in the state of New South Wales, Australia.

John George Gough, was one of the founders of the New South Wales Labour Party, initially the Labour Electoral League, the first political Labour movement in Australia. He was also one of Labour's five-member leadership group when the party first made its appearance in the New South Wales parliament in 1891. Representing Young, he was first elected in 1889 to the parliament's lower house as a member of the Protectionist Party, which produced Australia's first two prime ministers, Edmund Barton and Alfred Deakin. From 1891 to 1894 he represented Labour. Proud that his mother was Australian-born, he was a strong nationalist and republican. John Gough’s maternal grandmother was half-aboriginal. He is the only one of Labor’s founding fathers who has been found to have had aboriginal ancestry.

New South Wales experienced the first gold rush in Australia, a period generally accepted to lie between 1851 and 1880. This period in the history of New South Wales resulted in a rapid growth in the population and significant boost to the economy of the colony of New South Wales. The California Gold Rush three years prior signaled the impacts on society that gold fever would produce, both positive and negative. The New South Wales colonial government concealed the early discoveries, but various factors changed the policy.

Blackguard Gully

Blackguard Gully is a heritage-listed former Chinese mining camp and now reserve at Whiteman Avenue, Young, Hilltops Council, New South Wales, Australia. It was part of the Lambing Flat or Burragorang goldfields, and was a primary location of the anti-Chinese Lambing Flat riots of 1861. The property is owned by the Hilltops Council. It was added to the New South Wales State Heritage Register on 13 March 2009.

References

  1. 1 2 Australian Bureau of Statistics (27 June 2017). "Young (Urban Centre)". 2016 Census QuickStats. Retrieved 3 December 2017. OOjs UI icon edit-ltr-progressive.svg
  2. Premier Postal History. "Post Office List". Premier Postal Auctions. Archived from the original on 19 August 2008. Retrieved 26 May 2011.
  3. "Young". Geographical Names Register (GNR) of NSW. Geographical Names Board of New South Wales . Retrieved 30 July 2013. OOjs UI icon edit-ltr-progressive.svg
  4. Reed, A. W. (1973). Place Names of Australia (1984 ed.). Frenches Forest: Reed Books. p. 234.
  5. 1 2 "The Old Pioneering Days". The Land (1128). New South Wales, Australia. 3 February 1933. p. 24. Retrieved 27 October 2018 via National Library of Australia.
  6. 1 2 3 4 "History". visityoung.com. Archived from the original on 8 February 2007. Retrieved 9 February 2007.
  7. "New beginning". The Young Witness. Fairfax Media. 12 July 2013. Archived from the original on 25 April 2014.
  8. "Young Railway Station and yard group". New South Wales State Heritage Register . Office of Environment and Heritage. H01294. Retrieved 17 May 2018.
  9. "City Bank (former)". New South Wales State Heritage Register . Office of Environment and Heritage. H00710. Retrieved 17 May 2018.
  10. "Blackguard Gully". New South Wales State Heritage Register . Office of Environment and Heritage. H01775. Retrieved 17 May 2018.
  11. R.L. Specht; Philip Rundel; W.E. Westman; P.C. Catling; Jonathan Majer; Penelope Greenslade (6 December 2012). Mediterranean-type Ecosystems: A data source book. Springer Science & Business Media. p.  95. ISBN   978-94-009-3099-5.
  12. "Climate statistics for Young Airport". Bureau of Meteorology. Commonwealth of Australia. Archived from the original on 18 November 2017. Retrieved 18 November 2017.
  13. 1 2 3 4 Sharp, Stuart (January 2002). "Chinaman's Dam Young". Australian Railway Historical Society Bulletin : 3–8.

Commons-logo.svg Media related to Young, New South Wales at Wikimedia Commons