86 BC

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Millennium: 1st millennium BC
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
86 BC in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 86 BC
LXXXV BC
Ab urbe condita 668
Ancient Egypt era XXXIII dynasty, 238
- Pharaoh Ptolemy IX Lathyros, 3
Ancient Greek era 173rd Olympiad, year 3
Assyrian calendar 4665
Balinese saka calendar N/A
Bengali calendar −678
Berber calendar 865
Buddhist calendar 459
Burmese calendar −723
Byzantine calendar 5423–5424
Chinese calendar 甲午(Wood  Horse)
2611 or 2551
     to 
乙未年 (Wood  Goat)
2612 or 2552
Coptic calendar −369 – −368
Discordian calendar 1081
Ethiopian calendar −93 – −92
Hebrew calendar 3675–3676
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat −29 – −28
 - Shaka Samvat N/A
 - Kali Yuga 3015–3016
Holocene calendar 9915
Iranian calendar 707 BP – 706 BP
Islamic calendar 729 BH – 728 BH
Javanese calendar N/A
Julian calendar N/A
Korean calendar 2248
Minguo calendar 1997 before ROC
民前1997年
Nanakshahi calendar −1553
Seleucid era 226/227 AG
Thai solar calendar 457–458
Tibetan calendar 阳木马年
(male Wood-Horse)
41 or −340 or −1112
     to 
阴木羊年
(female Wood-Goat)
42 or −339 or −1111

Year 86 BC was a year of the pre-Julian Roman calendar. At the time it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Cinna and Marius/Flaccus (or, less frequently, year 668 Ab urbe condita ). The denomination 86 BC for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

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Aristion was a philosopher who became tyrant of Athens from c. 88 BC until his death in 86 BC. Aristion joined forces with king Mithridates VI of Pontus against Greece’s overlords, the Romans, fighting alongside Pontic forces during the First Mithridatic War, but to no avail. On 1 March 86 BC, after a long and destructive siege, Athens was taken by the Roman general Lucius Cornelius Sulla who had Aristion executed.

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