Assyrian calendar

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The Assyrian calendar (Assyrian Neo-Aramaic : ܣܘܼܪܓܵܕ݂ܵܐ ܐܵܬ݂ܘܼܪܵܝܵܐsūrgāḏā ʾĀṯūrāyā) is a solar calendar used by modern Assyrian people. The year begins with the first sight of Spring.

Contents

4750 BC was set as its first year in the 1950s, [1] based on a series of articles published in the Assyrian nationalist magazine Gilgamesh; the first came in 1952 and written by Nimrod Simono and dealt with the Akitu festival, then an article by Jean Alkhas in 1955 (April, issue 34) fixed the year 4750 BC as the starting point. [2] Alkhas referenced his information to a French archaeologist, whom he did not name, as stating that a cuneiform tablet dating to 4750 BC mentioned the year of the calming of the great flood and beginning of life. [3]

The Assyrian new year is still celebrated every year with festivals and gatherings. As of July2020 AD, it is the 6770th year of the Assyrian calendar, and this calendar is used among many Assyrian communities. It begins 4,750 years before the Gregorian calendar; to calculate the current year (after April 1) in the Assyrian calendar, add 4750 to the current Georgian calendar year (4750 + 2020 = Assyrian year 6770).

The Assyrian month names are also used in the Arabic Gregorian solar calendar in the Levant and Mesopotamia (Iraq, Syria, Jordan, Lebanon and Palestine).

Months

Assyrian calendar [4] [ unreliable source? ]
Season Syriac Transliteration Levantine Arabic DescriptionBlessed byDaysGregorian calendar
SpringܢܝܣܢNīsānنَيْسَان
Naysān
Month of Happiness Enlil 31April
ܐܝܪʾĪyārأَيَّار
ʾAyyār
Month of Love Haya 31May
ܚܙܝܪܢḤzīrānحَزِيرَان
Ḥazīrān
Month of Building Sin 31June
SummerܬܡܘܙTammūzتَمُّوز
Tammūz
Month of Harvesting Tammuz 31July
ܐܒ\ܛܒܚʾĀb/Ṭabbāḥآب
ʾĀb
Month of Ripening of Fruits Shamash 31August
ܐܝܠܘܠʾĪlūlأَيْلُول
ʾAylūl
Month of Sprinkling of Seeds Ishtar 31September
Autumnܬܫܪܝܢ ܐTešrīn Qḏīmتِشْرِين ٱلْأَوَّل
Tišrīn al-ʾAwwal
Month of Giving Anu 30October
ܬܫܪܝܢ ܒTešrīn [ʾ]Ḥrāyتِشْرِين ٱلثَّانِي
Tišrīn aṯ-Ṯānī
Month of Awakening of Buried Seeds Marduk 30November
ܟܢܘܢ ܐKānōn Qḏīmكَانُون ٱلْأَوَّل
Kānūn al-ʾAwwal
Month of Conceiving Nergal 30December
Winterܟܢܘܢ ܒKānōn [ʾ]Ḥrāyكَانُون ٱلثَّانِي
Kānūn aṯ-Ṯānī
Month of RestingNasho30January
ܫܒܛŠḇāṭشُبَاط
Šubāṭ
Month of Flooding Raman 30February
ܐܕܪʾĀḏarآذَار
ʾĀḏār
Month of Evil SpiritsRokhaty29March

See also

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References

  1. Wozniak, Marta (2012). "Far from Aram-Nahrin: The Suryoye Diaspora Experience". In Eamer, Allyson (ed.). Border Terrains: World Diasporas in the 21st Century. Inter-Disciplinary Press, Oxford. p. 78. ISBN   978-1-84888-117-4.
  2. Paulissian, Robert (1999). "Tasheeta d'zoyakha d'rish sheta Khatta d'Atoraye w'Bawlaye (Part II) [Assyrian and Babylonian New Year Celebrations (Part II)]". Journal of Assyrian Academic Studies. 13 (2): 35. ISSN   1055-6982.
  3. Daniel, Sennacherib (2001). "Modern Festival, Ancient Tradition" (PDF). Nakosha. 39: 3. OCLC   49885037.
  4. "The True Assyrian Calendar - Assyrian Knowledge". Archived from the original on 2010-07-28. Retrieved 2012-11-25.