Korean era name

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  1. Juche (주체, 主體 : 1912-)

The North Korean government and associated organizations use a variation of the Gregorian calendar with a Juche year based on April 15, 1912 CE, the date of birth of Kim Il-sung, as year 1. There is no Juche year 0. The calendar was introduced in 1997. Months are unchanged from those in the standard Gregorian calendar. In many instances, the Juche year is given after the CE year, for example, 26 December2021 Juche 110. But in North Korean publications, the Juche year is usually placed before the corresponding CE year, as in Juche 110 (2021).

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References

  1. Lü, Zongli (2003). Power of the words: Chen prophecy in Chinese politics, AD 265-618. ISBN   9783906769561.
  2. 1 2 Sogner, Sølvi (2001). Making Sense of Global History: The 19th International Congress of the Historical Sciences, Oslo 2000, Commemorative Volume. ISBN   9788215001067.
  3. "International Congress of Historical Sciences". International Congress of Historical Sciences. 19. 2000. ISBN   9788299561419 . Retrieved 29 December 2019.
  4. "Ancient tradition carries forward with Japan's new era" . Retrieved 29 December 2019.
  5. Kim Haboush, JaHyun (2005), "Contesting Chinese Time, Nationalizing Temporal Space: Temporal Inscription in Late Chosǒn Korea", in Lynn A. Struve (ed.), Time, Temporality, and Imperial Transition, Honolulu: University of Hawai'i Press, pp. 115–141, ISBN   0-8248-2827-5 .

Bibliography

Korean era name