Adamstown, Pitcairn Islands

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Adamstown

Adamstaun (Pitkern)
Adamstown1.jpg
View of Adamstown
Map of Pitcairn Islands 2.png
Location of Adamstown
Coordinates: 25°4′S130°6′W / 25.067°S 130.100°W / -25.067; -130.100 Coordinates: 25°4′S130°6′W / 25.067°S 130.100°W / -25.067; -130.100
Overseas territory Pitcairn Islands
Sovereign StateUnited Kingdom
Island Pitcairn
Government
  TypeNo local government. Administered by government of the Pitcairn Islands
   Mayor of the Pitcairn Islands Charlene Warren-Peu
Area
[1]
  Total4.6 km2 (1.8 sq mi)
  Land4.6 km2 (1.8 sq mi)
Elevation
330 m (1,080 ft)
Population
 (2021)
  Total40
  Density8.7/km2 (23/sq mi)
Climate Tropical rainforest climate (Af)

Adamstown is the capital of, and the only settlement on, the Pitcairn Islands.

Contents

Overview

Adamstown has a population of 40, which is the entire population of the Pitcairn Islands. All the other islands in the group are uninhabited. Adamstown is where most residents live, while they grow food in other areas of the island. [2]

Adamstown is the third smallest capital in the world by population. It has access to television, satellite Internet, and a telephone; however, the main means of communication remains ham radio. The "Hill of Difficulty" connects the island's jetty to the town.

History

The history of the Pitcairn Islands begins with the settlement of the islands by Polynesians in the 11th century. The Polynesians established a culture that flourished for four centuries and then vanished. Pitcairn was settled again in 1790 by a group of British mutineers on HMS Bounty and Tahitians. Adamstown is named for the last surviving mutineer, John Adams.

Geography

The settlement is located on the central-north side of the island of Pitcairn, facing the Pacific Ocean and close to the Bounty Bay, the only seaport of the island.

Climate

Adamstown has a tropical rainforest climate (Af) under the Köppen climate classification system. The hamlet features a wet, warm climate averaging 1,700 mm (67 in) of rain a year. The wettest month is December and temperatures do not vary significantly throughout the year.

Climate data for Adamstown
MonthJanFebMarAprMayJunJulAugSepOctNovDecYear
Record high °C (°F)31.7
(89.1)
32.4
(90.3)
33.3
(91.9)
30.7
(87.3)
29.1
(84.4)
31.3
(88.3)
26.7
(80.1)
26.7
(80.1)
25.7
(78.3)
27.2
(81.0)
27.6
(81.7)
29.3
(84.7)
33.3
(91.9)
Average high °C (°F)28
(82)
28
(82)
28
(82)
26
(79)
25
(77)
23
(73)
22
(72)
22
(72)
23
(73)
24
(75)
26
(79)
27
(81)
27.4
(81.3)
Daily mean °C (°F)25.0
(77.0)
25.5
(77.9)
25.0
(77.0)
23.5
(74.3)
22.5
(72.5)
21.0
(69.8)
20.0
(68.0)
20.0
(68.0)
20.5
(68.9)
21.0
(69.8)
22.5
(72.5)
24.0
(75.2)
22.5
(72.6)
Average low °C (°F)22
(72)
23
(73)
22
(72)
21
(70)
20
(68)
19
(66)
18
(64)
18
(64)
18
(64)
18
(64)
19
(66)
21
(70)
19.7
(67.5)
Record low °C (°F)20
(68)
20
(68)
20
(68)
18
(64)
17
(63)
14
(57)
14
(57)
14
(57)
15
(59)
15
(59)
17
(63)
18
(64)
14
(57)
Average rainfall mm (inches)120
(4.7)
140
(5.5)
120
(4.7)
155
(6.1)
130
(5.1)
155
(6.1)
150
(5.9)
125
(4.9)
140
(5.5)
135
(5.3)
120
(4.7)
165
(6.5)
1,655
(65)
Average rainy days141313121111111212131414150
Source: [3]

Personalities

See also

Notes and references

  1. Area of the island of Pitcairn
  2. www.lareau.org/pitc.html Archived July 25, 2006, at the Wayback Machine
  3. "Climate - Pitcairn Islands" . Retrieved 22 September 2018.

Related Research Articles

Pitcairn Islands British overseas territory in the South Pacific

The Pitcairn Islands, officially the Pitcairn, Henderson, Ducie and Oeno Islands, is a group of four volcanic islands in the southern Pacific Ocean that form the sole British Overseas Territory in the Pacific Ocean. The four islands — Pitcairn proper, Henderson, Ducie, and Oeno — are scattered across several hundred kilometres of ocean and have a combined land area of about 18 square miles (47 km2). Henderson Island accounts for 86% of the land area, but only Pitcairn Island is inhabited. The islands nearest to the Pitcairn Islands are Mangareva to the west and Easter Island to the east.

Mutiny on the <i>Bounty</i> 1789 mutiny aboard the British Royal Navy ship HMS Bounty

The mutiny on the Royal Navy vessel HMS Bounty occurred in the South Pacific Ocean on 28 April 1789. Disaffected crewmen, led by acting-Lieutenant Fletcher Christian, seized control of the ship from their captain, Lieutenant William Bligh, and set him and 18 loyalists adrift in the ship's open launch. The mutineers variously settled on Tahiti or on Pitcairn Island. Bligh navigated more than 3,500 nautical miles in the launch to reach safety, and began the process of bringing the mutineers to justice.

John Adams (mutineer)

John Adams, known as Jack Adams, was the last survivor of the Bounty mutineers who settled on Pitcairn Island in January 1790, the year after the mutiny. His real name was John Adams, but he used the name Alexander Smith until he was discovered in 1808 by Captain Mayhew Folger of the American whaling ship Topaz. His children used the surname "Adams".

History of the Pitcairn Islands

The history of the Pitcairn Islands begins with the colonization of the islands by Polynesians in the 11th century. Polynesian people established a culture that flourished for four centuries and then vanished. They lived on Pitcairn and Henderson Islands, and on Mangareva Island 540 kilometres (340 mi) to the northwest, for about 400 years.

Fletcher Christian Mutineer on HMS Bounty (1764–1793)

Fletcher Christian was master's mate on board HMS Bounty during Lieutenant William Bligh's voyage to Tahiti during 1787–1789 for breadfruit plants. In the mutiny on the Bounty, Christian seized command of the ship from Bligh on 28 April 1789. Some of the mutineers were left on Tahiti, while Christian, eight other mutineers, six Tahitian men and eleven Tahitian women settled on isolated Pitcairn Island, and Bounty was burned. After the settlement was discovered in 1808, the sole surviving mutineer gave conflicting accounts of how Christian died.

HMS <i>Pandora</i> (1779)

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Ducie Island Atoll in the Pitcairn Islands, British Overseas Territories

Ducie Island is an uninhabited atoll in the Pitcairn Islands. It lies east of Pitcairn Island, and east of Henderson Island, and has a total area of 1.5 square miles (3.9 km2), which includes the lagoon. It is 1.5 miles (2.4 km) long, measured northeast to southwest, and about 1 mile (1.6 km) wide. The island is composed of four islets: Acadia, Pandora, Westward and Edwards.

Meralda Elva Junior Warren is an artist and poet of the Pitcairn Islands, a remote British Overseas Territory in the South Pacific. She works in both English and Pitkern, the island's distinctive creole language. Her book, Mi Bas Side Orn Pitcairn, written with the island's six children, is the first to be written and published in both English and Pitkern. As an artist, she works with tapa cloth, a Polynesian tradition. She has also published a cookbook featuring Pitcairn Island cuisine.

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HMS <i>Bounty</i> 18th-century Royal Navy vessel

HMS Bounty, also known as HM Armed Vessel Bounty, was a small merchant vessel that the Royal Navy purchased in 1787 for a botanical mission. The ship was sent to the South Pacific Ocean under the command of William Bligh to acquire breadfruit plants and transport them to the West Indies. That mission was never completed owing to a 1789 mutiny led by acting lieutenant Fletcher Christian, an incident now popularly known as the mutiny on the Bounty. The mutineers later burned Bounty while she was moored at Pitcairn Island. An American adventurer rediscovered the remains of the Bounty in 1957; various parts of it have been salvaged since then.

<i>Bounty</i> Bible

The Bounty Bible is a Bible that is thought to have been used on HMS Bounty, the ship famed for the Mutiny on the Bounty.

Complement of HMS <i>Bounty</i>

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