American Society of Cinematographers

Last updated
American Society of Cinematographers
American Society of Cinematographers
ASC-logo.png
AbbreviationASC
MottoLoyalty, Progress, Artistry
FormationJanuary 8, 1919;102 years ago (1919-01-08)
TypeProfessional Organization
PurposeAdvancing the art and science of cinematography and bringing cinematographers together to exchange ideas, discuss techniques and promote the motion picture as an art form.
Headquarters Hollywood, California
Membership
380 [1]
Official language
English
Key people
Stephen Lighthill - President
Main organ
Board
Website https://theasc.com/

The American Society of Cinematographers (ASC), founded in Hollywood in 1919, is a cultural, educational, and professional organization that is neither a labor union nor a guild. [2] The society was organized to advance the science and art of cinematography and gather a wide range of cinematographers to discuss techniques and ideas and to advocate for motion pictures as a type of art form. [2] Currently, the president of the ASC is Stephen Lighthill. [1]

Contents

Members use the post-nominal letters "ASC". On the 1920 film titled Sand, cinematographer Joseph H. August, who was an original member of the ASC, became the first individual to have the "ASC" appear after his name on the onscreen credit. [3]

Only film cinematographers and special effect supervisors can become an ASC member. [2] Basic requirements include being a director of photography for a minimum five out of the last eight years, having a high professional reputation and being recommended by three active or retired ASC members. [4]

History

In the beginning of cinema, directors and photographers in the United States had a similar problem: they had "big, ugly white streaks" that resulted from static electricity discharged from the cameras. Two separate groups in the United States worked together to find a solution to this problem. [2] The two groups were the Cinema Camera Club and the Static Club of America. [2]

A precursor to the ASC, the Cinema Camera Club in New York City was founded in 1913 by Arthur Miller, Phil Rosen, and Frank Kugler. [2] Arthur and his brother, William Miller, both filmmakers in New York City, worked together and established a union for cinematography workers called the Motion Picture Industry Union. Miller left to work in Hollywood, California, one year after the Motion Picture Industry Union was formed.

In 1918, Phil Rosen asked the president of the Cinema Camera Club of California, Charles Rosher, whether he could help reorganize the association by creating a national organization with "membership by invitation and a strong educational component". This reorganisation and the setup of the bylaws occurred on December 21, 1918. The ASC was officially authorized by the State of California on January 8, 1919. [2]

In 2014, the ASC admitted its first member with no background in live action feature film, Pixar's Sharon Calahan, who had worked entirely in computer animation. [5] [6] [7] The society started the ASC Master Class education program in the same year (2014). This program allows members of the ASC and other professionals to teach students from all walks of life on various subjects including composition, lighting, angles, creating mood among other techniques of visual storytelling. [2]

In 2017, John Bailey, an ASC member, was elected as the president of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, making him the first cinematographer to take up such a position. [2]

Publications

In the 1920s, the ASC began printing a four-page newsletter titled The American Cinematographer in 1920. According to the ASC, "The American Cinematographer covers the technology and artistry of visual storytelling, offering print and digital editions." [2] Within this publication a wide range of cinematographer and technical information was produced through a variety of means such as interviews, articles, blogs and podcasts. [8]

Other than the magazine, the ASC also publishes the American Cinematographer Manual . The first edition was published in 1935 by Jackson J. Rose as The American Cinematographer Hand Book and Reference Guide. The Hand Book evolved from the Cinematographic Annual only published twice, in 1930 and 1931. Rose's handbook went through nine editions by the middle of the 1950s, and it was from this book that the modern American Cinematographer Manual originated. The first edition of the new manual was published in 1960 and is now in its 10th edition, published in 2016. [2]

Founding members

Award categories

Film

Television

Lifetime Achievement

See also

Related Research Articles

Cinematographer Chief over the camera and lighting crews working on a film

A cinematographer or director of photography is the chief over the camera and light crews working on a film, television production or other live action piece and is responsible for making artistic and technical decisions related to the image. The study and practice of this field is referred to as cinematography.

László Kovács (cinematographer) Hungarian cinematographer

László KovácsASC was a Hungarian cinematographer who was influential in the development of American New Wave films in the 1970s, collaborating with directors like Peter Bogdanovich, Richard Rush, Dennis Hopper, Norman Jewison, and Martin Scorsese. Most famous for his work on Easy Rider (1969) and Five Easy Pieces (1970), Kovács was the recipient of numerous awards, including three Lifetime Achievement Awards. He was an active member of the American Society of Cinematographers and was member of the organization's board of directors.

Roy Henry Wagner III, ASC is an American cinematographer known for dramatic, dark imagery. Named by Kodak as one of the "Top 100 Directors of Photography in the World" Wagner's career has spanned 35 years in the motion picture and television industries. He has also received the ASC Award for Outstanding Achievement in Cinematography for a Miniseries, and is a two-time Primetime Emmy Award nominee.

American Cinematographer is a magazine published monthly by the American Society of Cinematographers. It focuses on the art and craft of cinematography, covering domestic and foreign feature productions, television productions, short films, music videos and commercials. The emphasis is on interviews with cinematographers, but directors and other filmmakers are often featured as well. Articles include technical how-to pieces, discussions of tools and technologies that affect cinematography, and historical features.

Philip H. Lathrop

Philip H. Lathrop, A.S.C. was an American cinematographer noted for his skills with wide screen technology and detailed approach to lighting and camera placement. He spent most of his life in movie studios. Lathrop was known for such films as Touch of Evil (1958), Lonely Are the Brave (1962), The Americanization of Emily (1964), The Cincinnati Kid (1965), Point Blank (1967), Finian's Rainbow (1968), The Traveling Executioner (1970), Portnoy's Complaint (1972), Earthquake (1974), Swashbuckler (1976), The Driver (1978), Moment by Moment (1978), A Change of Seasons (1980), Foolin' Around (1980), Loving Couples (1980), and Deadly Friend (1986).

Frederick Elmes, ASC is an American cinematographer, known for his association with the independent film movement. He is a long-time collaborator of directors David Lynch, Ang Lee, Charlie Kaufman, Jim Jarmusch, and Todd Solondz. He has won the Independent Spirit Award for Best Cinematography twice, for Wild at Heart and Night on Earth, and a Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Cinematography for a Limited Series for The Night Of.

Frederick James Koenekamp, A.S.C. was an American cinematographer. He was the son of cinematographer Hans F. Koenekamp.

Russell Paul Carpenter, ASC is an internationally acclaimed American cinematographer and photographer with a long career as Director of Photography of theatrical motion pictures. He was honored with the Lifetime Achievement Award from the American Society of Cinematographers.

Jordan Scott Cronenweth, ASC was an American cinematographer based in Los Angeles, California. A contemporary of Conrad Hall, he was recognized for his distinctive style of heavily textured, film noir-inspired photography, seen in numerous classic films, including Zandy's Bride, Gable and Lombard, Altered States, and Peggy Sue Got Married. He is perhaps best remembered for his BAFTA Award-winning work on the groundbreaking science fiction film Blade Runner, which is credited as codifying the cyberpunk aesthetic, and is lauded by some as among the best cinematography of all time.

Stephen Goldblatt

Stephen Goldblatt, A.S.C., B.S.C. is a South African-born British cinematographer, noted for his work on numerous high-profile action films, including the first two entries in the Lethal Weapon series, as well as for his recent collaborations with director Mike Nichols and Tate Taylor.

Richard Pope, B.S.C. is a British cinematographer who has worked with British film director Mike Leigh. He has twice been nominated for an Academy Award, for The Illusionist and Mr. Turner.

David Gribble is an Australian cinematographer and director of photography based in New South Wales. He has also worked in the United States, filming TV movies and other works.

John Newton Green, ASC, is an American cinematographer and film director best known for his Oscar-nominated collaborations with actor/director Clint Eastwood, taking over from Eastwood's previous collaborator Bruce Surtees.

Larry Fong is an American cinematographer born in Los Angeles, California.

Jerzy Karol Zieliński is a Polish cinematographer.

Robert Kurrle American cinematographer

Robert Kurrle, also known as Robert B. Kurrle, was an American cinematographer during the silent and early talking film eras. Prior to entering the film industry, he was already experimenting with aerial photography. Considered a very prominent cinematographer, even his early work received notice and praise from both critics and other industry professionals. The advent of sound film did not abate his continued rise, and he became the top director of photography at Warner Brothers by 1932.

Nancy Schreiber

Nancy Schreiber is an American cinematographer known for her work on Chain of Desire, Dead Beat, The Celluloid Closet, November, and The Nines.

The Pierre Angénieux ExcelLens in Cinematography is an annual award that pays tribute to a prominent international director of photography at the Cannes Film Festival. The award originated in 2013.

Sharon Calahan American cinematographer

Sharon Calahan is an American cinematographer who was director of photography on the Pixar films A Bug's Life (1998), Toy Story 2 (1999), and Finding Nemo (2003), and was lighting director for Ratatouille (2007), Cars 2 (2011), and The Good Dinosaur (2015). She took part in the early rise of computer animated feature filmmaking and the acceptance of that medium as cinematography. Calahan is the first member of the American Society of Cinematographers who was invited to join on the basis of a career entirely in animated film. She was nominated, with Bill Reeves, Eben Ostby, and Rick Sayre, for a 2000 BAFTA Award for Best Achievement in Special Visual Effects for A Bug's Life.

References

  1. 1 2 "Members - The American Society of Cinematographers". theasc.com. Retrieved 2020-10-26.
  2. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 "About - The American Society of Cinematographers". theasc.com. Retrieved 2018-09-19.
  3. Sand (1920), IMDb , retrieved 2018-09-19
  4. Marine, Joe (2015-08-06). "How to Become a Member of the American Society of Cinematographers". No Film School. Retrieved 2018-09-19.
  5. Giardina, Carolyn (2014-01-31). "Pixar's Sharon Calahan on Animation, Live Action Convergence". The Hollywood Reporter . Retrieved 2018-09-16.
  6. Workman, Matt (2014-08-24). "First CG Director of Photography joins the ASC Q/A with Sharon Calahan, ASC". Archived from the original on 2017-09-13.
  7. Wolff, Ellen (December 21, 2014). "The Evolving Role of the CG Director of Photography". Animation Magazine . Retrieved 2018-09-16.
  8. "The American Society of Cinematographers". ascmag.com. Retrieved 2018-09-19.