Attercliffe railway station

Last updated

Attercliffe
Geograph-1234140-by-Martin-Speck.jpg
Attercliffe Station remains in 2009, seen from the Sheffield Canal, with the floodlights of the former Don Valley Stadium in the background.
Location Attercliffe, City of Sheffield
England
Coordinates 53°23′36″N1°25′32″W / 53.393472°N 1.425444°W / 53.393472; -1.425444 Coordinates: 53°23′36″N1°25′32″W / 53.393472°N 1.425444°W / 53.393472; -1.425444
Grid reference SK383886
Platforms2
Other information
StatusDisused
History
Original company South Yorkshire Railway
Pre-grouping Manchester, Sheffield and Lincolnshire Railway,
Great Central Railway
Post-grouping London and North Eastern Railway
Key dates
August 1871Station opened
26 September 1927Station closed

Attercliffe railway station was built to serve the Parish of Attercliffe cum Darnall, then separated from but now part of the City of Sheffield, South Yorkshire, England.

The station was situated on the Manchester, Sheffield and Lincolnshire Railway company's line between Woodburn Junction and Tinsley Junction which was served by trains between Sheffield Victoria, Barnsley and Rotherham Central. Access to the station was by a footpath from Worksop Road. At the station's opening this was the main road between Attercliffe (it left the main Sheffield-Rotherham road opposite the parish church), and Darnall. The station consisted of two platforms flanking the lines and these were linked by a subway.

History

The original station was opened in August 1871, closed on 31 December 1900 and replaced by a new structure which opened the following day. The station was closed on 26 September 1927 but is remembered by the "Station Hotel" on Attercliffe Road, a short distance away which had, and may still have, a fine pictorial sign depicting a station porter at work on the station.

MSLR was renamed the Great Central Railway in 1897. It became part of the London and North Eastern Railway during the Grouping of 1923. Attercliffe Station closed four years later.

Earthworks of the station platforms are still visible as is the subway, now bricked-up, from the towpath of the Sheffield Canal alongside which the railway runs.

Preceding station Disused railways Following station
Sheffield Victoria   LNER
Great Central Railway
Sheffield Victoria-Doncaster Line
  Broughton Lane

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References