Cabinet of Fiji

Last updated
Politics of Fiji
Coat of arms of Fiji.svg
Polity type Parliamentary Representative Democratic Republic
Constitution Constitution of Fiji
Legislative branch
Name Parliament of Fiji
Type Unicameral
Presiding officer Epeli Nailatikau, Honorable Speaker
Executive branch
Head of State
Title President
Currently Jioji Konrote
Appointer Parliament
Head of Government
Title Prime Minister
Currently Frank Bainimarama
Appointer President
Cabinet
NameCabinet of Fiji
Current cabinetCabinet of Frank Bainimarama
LeaderPrime Minister
Judicial branch
Courts The Supreme Court, The High Court, Court of Appeal, and The Magistrates Court

The Cabinet of Fiji is a Government body of Ministers appointed by the Prime Minister of Fiji and responsible to the Parliament of Fiji. The Cabinet's constitutional basis is sections 90 to 96 of the 2013 Constitution of Fiji. [1]

Cabinet consists of the Prime Minister as chair and a number of Ministers. [2] With the exception of the Attorney-General, they must be members of Parliament. Ministers hold office at the pleasure of the Prime Minister, or until they resign or cease to be MPs. [3]

The cabinet is responsible to Parliament. Ministers must provide regular reports to Parliament on their areas of responsibility and must appear before Parliament or any committee on a request to answer questions about their areas of responsibility. [4]

Prior to the 2006 Fijian coup d'état and the 2009 Fijian constitutional crisis, Fiji's Cabinet was governed by the 1997 Constitution. An unusual feature of the constitution was to require a compulsory coalition cabinet, with every political party with more than 8 seats in the 71-member parliament required to be offered a proportionate number of cabinet posts. The model was not successfully implemented for nearly a decade, with the governments of both Mahendra Chaudhry and Laisenia Qarase refusing to offer Cabinet seats to their political opponents. It was only after the 2006 election that a full multi-party Cabinet was appointed. The multi-party model was not continued in the 2013 constitution.

Current cabinet

After the 2018 General elections:

Party key FijiFirst
Cabinet of Fiji: November 2018 – present
PortraitPortfolioIncumbent
Frank Bainimarama November 2014.jpg Prime Minister
Minister for iTaukei Affairs
Minister for Sugar
Foreign Affairs
Frank Bainimarama
Aiyaz Sayed-Khaiyum May 2020.jpg Attorney-General
Minister for Justice,Economy, Civil Service, Communications and Public Enterprises
Aiyaz Sayed-Khaiyum
Premila Kumar.jpg Minister for Local Government
Housing and Commercial Development
Premila Kumar
Inia Seruiratu March 2016.jpg Minister for National Security and Defence Inia Seruiratu
Semi Koroilavesau.jpg Minister for Fisheries Semi Koroilavesau
Mereseini Vuniwaqa 2018.jpg Minister for Women, Children and Poverty Alleviation Mereseini Vuniwaqa
Parveen Bala May 2016.jpg Minister for Employment, Productivity
Industrial Relations
Youth and Sports
Parveen Bala
Rosy Sofia Akbar 2014.jpg Minister for Education and Heritage, Arts Rosy Akbar
Mahendra Reddy April 2015.jpg Minister of Agriculture
Environment, Rural and Maritime Development
Waterways
Mahendra Reddy
Ifereimi Waqainabete 2019.jpg Minister for Health and Medical Services Ifereimi Waqainabete
Jone Usamate 2016.jpg Minister for Infrastructure
Transport
Disaster Management and Meteorological services
Jone Usamate
Osea Naiqamu 2018.jpg Minister for Forestry Osea Naiqamu
Faiyaz Koya May 2020.jpg Minister for Commerce, Trade, Tourism and Transport Faiyaz Koya
Assistant Ministers
No image.svg Assistant Minister for Education, Heritage & Arts Joseph Nand
Viam Pillay 2017.jpg Assistant Minister for Agriculture
Environment, Rural and Maritime Development
Waterways
Viam Pillay
Veena Bhatnagar June 2015.jpg Assistant Minister for Women, Children and Poverty Alleviation
Deputy Speaker of the House
Veena Bhatnagar
No image.svg Assistant Minister for Agriculture
Environment, Rural and Maritime Development
Waterways
Jale Sigarara
No image.svg Assistant Minister for Health Alexander O'Connor
Vijay Nath 2016.jpg Assistant Minister for Local Government, Housing & Community Development Vijay Nath
No image.svg Assistant Minister for Employment, Productivity
Industrial Relations
Youth and Sports
Alvikh Maharaj
No image.svg Assistant Minister for Sugar George Vegnathan
Others
Epeli Nailatikau 2012.jpg Speaker of the House Epeli Nailatikau
Sitiveni Rabuka July 2016.jpg Leader of Opposition Sitiveni Rabuka
Jioji Konrote 2017.jpg Former FijiFirst cabinet minister, now President of Fiji Jioje Konrote

Related Research Articles

Politics of the Czech Republic Political system of the Czech Republic

The Czech Republic is a unitary parliamentary constitutional republic, in which the President is the head of state and the Prime Minister is the head of government.
Executive power is exercised by the Government of the Czech Republic which reports to the Chamber of Deputies. The Legislature is exercised by the Parliament. Czech Parliament is bicameral, the upper house of the Parliament is the Senate, the lower house of the Parliament is the Chamber of Deputies. The Senate consists of 81 members who are elected for six years. The Chamber of Deputies consists of 200 members who are elected for four years. The Judiciary system is topped by the trio of Constitutional Court, Supreme Court and Supreme Administrative Court.
The highest legal document is the Constitution of the Czech Republic, complemented by constitutional laws and the Charter of Fundamental Rights and Freedoms. The current constitution went in effect on 1st January 1993, after the Dissolution of Czechoslovakia.

Politics of Lithuania

Politics of Lithuania takes place in a framework of a unitary semi-presidential representative democratic republic, whereby the President of Lithuania is the head of state and the Prime Minister of Lithuania is the head of government, and of a multi-party system.

Politics of Malta Political system of Malta

The politics of Malta takes place within a framework of a parliamentary representative democratic republic, whereby the President of Malta is the constitutional head of state. Executive Authority is vested in the President of Malta with the general direction and control of the Government of Malta remaining with the Prime Minister of Malta who is the head of government and the cabinet. Legislative power is vested in the Parliament of Malta which consists of the President of Malta and the unicameral House of Representatives of Malta with the Speaker presiding officer of the legislative body. Judicial power remains with the Chief Justice and the Judiciary of Malta. Since Independence, the party electoral system has been dominated by the Christian democratic Nationalist Party and the social democratic Labour Party.

Prime minister Most senior minister of cabinet in the executive branch of government in a parliamentary system

A prime minister is the head of the cabinet and the leader of the ministers in the executive branch of government, often in a parliamentary or semi-presidential system. Under those systems, a prime minister is not the head of state of their respective state nor a monarch; rather the prime minister is the head of government, serving typically under a monarch in a hybrid of aristocratic and democratic government forms or a president in a republican form of government.

Westminster system Democratic parliamentary system of government

The Westminster system or Westminster model is a type of parliamentary government that incorporates a series of procedures for operating a legislature. This concept was first developed in England.

Politics of Fiji Political system of Fiji

The politics of Fiji take place within the framework of a parliamentary representative democratic republic. Fiji has a multiparty system with the Prime Minister of Fiji as head of government. The executive power is exercised by the government. Legislative power is vested in both the government and the Parliament of Fiji. The judiciary is mostly independent of the executive and the legislature.

Albania is a unitary parliamentary constitutional republic, where the President of Albania is the head of state and the Prime Minister of Albania the head of government in a multi-party system. The executive power is exercised by the Government and the Prime Minister with its Cabinet. Legislative power is vested in the Parliament of Albania. The judiciary is independent of the executive and the legislature. The political system of Albania is laid out in the 1998 constitution. The Parliament adopted the current constitution on 28 November 1998. Due to political instability, the country has had many constitutions during its history. Albania was initially constituted as a monarchy in 1913, briefly a republic in 1925, then it returned to a democratic monarchy in 1928. It later became a socialist republic until the restoration of capitalism and democracy in 1992.

In a parliamentary or semi-presidential system of government, a reserve power is a power that may be exercised by the head of state without the approval of another branch or part of the government. Unlike in a presidential system of government, the head of state is generally constrained by the cabinet or the legislature in a parliamentary system, and most reserve powers are usable only in certain exceptional circumstances. In some countries, reserve powers go by another name; for instance, the reserve powers of the President of Ireland are called discretionary powers.

Prime Minister of Denmark Head of government in the Kingdom of Denmark

The prime minister of Denmark is the head of government in the Kingdom of Denmark comprising the three constituent countries: Denmark, Greenland and the Faroe Islands. Before the creation of the modern office, the kingdom did not initially have a head of government separate from its head of state, namely the monarch, in whom the executive authority was vested. The Constitution of 1849 established a constitutional monarchy by limiting the powers of the monarch and creating the office of premierminister. The inaugural holder of the office was Adam Wilhelm Moltke.

Prime Minister of Fiji Head of the government of Fiji

The prime minister of the Republic of Fiji is the head of government of Fiji. The prime minister is appointed by the president under the terms of the 2013 Constitution of Fiji. He is the head of the cabinet and appoints and dismiss ministers.

Chapter 6: The Parliament.Chapter 6 of the Fiji Constitution is titled The Parliament. The five Parts, further subdivided into forty sections making up this chapter, set out the composition, functions, and powers of Fiji's bicameral legislature.

Chapter 7: Executive Government.Chapter 7 of the 1997 Constitution is titled Executive Government. There are five Parts, further subdivided into thirty sections, which set out the organization, functions, and responsibilities of the executive branch of government. Modeled on the Westminster system, Fiji's constitution does not separate the Executive and Legislative branches of government as strictly as do many democracies, but despite considerable overlap, the branches of government are nevertheless constitutionally distinct.

Chapter 10: State Services.Chapter 10 of the 1997 Constitution of Fiji is titled State Services. Its fifteen sections establish certain civil service offices, specify their functions and jurisdictions, set out the qualifications and preconditions required of persons holding such offices, and prescribes the manner of their appointment.

Leader of the Opposition (Fiji) Parliamentary position of Fiji

In Fiji, the Leader of the Opposition is a senior politician who commands the support of the Official Opposition. The Leader of the Opposition is, by convention, the leader of the largest political party in the Parliament of Fiji that is not in government. This is usually this is the parliamentary leader of the second-largest caucus in Parliament. It did not originate in Fiji but has a long tradition; in British constitutional theory, the Leader of the Opposition must pose a formal alternative to the government, ready to form a government himself should the Prime Minister lose the confidence of the parliament.

Prime Minister of Georgia

The Prime Minister of Georgia is the head of government and chief executive of Georgia.

Cabinet collective responsibility, also known as collective ministerial responsibility, is a constitutional convention in Parliamentary systems that members of the cabinet must publicly support all governmental decisions made in Cabinet, even if they do not privately agree with them. This support includes voting for the government in the legislature. Some Communist political parties apply a similar convention of democratic centralism to their central committee.

National Assembly (Mauritius)

The National Assembly is Mauritius's unicameral legislature, which was called the Legislative Assembly until 1992, when the country became a republic. The Constitution of Mauritius provides for the parliament of Mauritius to consist of the President and the National Assembly. The parliament of Mauritius is modelled after the Westminster system of parliamentary democracy, where members of parliament are voted in at regular general elections, on the basis of a first past the post system. The working language of the National Assembly is English.

Government of Georgia (country) Decision-making body in Georgia

The Government of Georgia is the supreme body of executive power in Georgia that implements the domestic and foreign policies of the country. It consists of Prime Minister—the head of the government—and ministers and is accountable and responsible to the Parliament of Georgia. The current powers and responsibilities of the Government are governed by the amendments of the Constitution of Georgia passed in 2017 and 2018. From 14 May 1991 to 9 November 1996, the executive government of Georgia was referred to as the Cabinet of Ministers of the Republic of Georgia.

Politics of Denmark

The politics of Denmark take place within the framework of a parliamentary representative democracy, a constitutional monarchy and a decentralised unitary state in which the monarch of Denmark, Queen Margrethe II, is the head of state. Denmark is described as a nation state. Danish politics and governance are characterized by a common striving for broad consensus on important issues, within both the political community and society as a whole.

Constitutional Government of East Timor

The Constitutional Government is the administration or cabinet under the Constitution of East Timor, which refers to it simply as "The Government".

References

  1. Constitution of the Republic of Fiji, chapter 4, part B.
  2. Constitution of the Republic of Fiji, section 91.
  3. Constitution of the Republic of Fiji, section 95.
  4. Constitution of the Republic of Fiji, section 95.