Corunda

Last updated
Corunda
Corundas.jpg
Type Dumpling
Place of origin Mexico

Corunda is a Mexican food, similar to tamales, but wrapped in a long green corn plant leaf, and folded, making a triangular shape or spherical shape. They are typically steamed until golden and eaten with cream and red salsa. Unlike tamales, they do not always have a filling. They are usually made using cornflour, salt, sour cream, and water. Some corundas are filled with salsa on the inside. Commonly sold in 12.

It is a common food in the state of Michoacán. [1]

See also

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References

  1. Esparza, Bill (7 April 2015). "Essential T: Mole Casero con Corundas at Restaurante Las Michoacanas". Los Angeles . Retrieved 7 July 2015.