Division of Newcastle

Last updated

Newcastle
Australian House of Representatives Division
Division of NEWCASTLE 2016.png
Division of Newcastle in New South Wales, as of the 2016 federal election.
Created1901
MP Sharon Claydon
Party Labor
Namesake Newcastle
Electors 117,746 (2019)
Area171 km2 (66.0 sq mi)
DemographicProvincial

The Division of Newcastle is an Australian electoral division in the state of New South Wales.

Divisions of the Australian House of Representatives federal electorates in Australia

In Australia, electoral districts for the Australian House of Representatives are called divisions or more commonly referred to as electorates or seats. There are currently 151 single-member electorates for the Australian House of Representatives.

States and territories of Australia first-level subdivision of Australia

Government in the Commonwealth of Australia is exercised on three levels: federal, states and territories, and local government.

New South Wales State of Australia

New South Wales is a state on the east coast of Australia. It borders Queensland to the north, Victoria to the south, and South Australia to the west. Its coast borders the Coral and Tasman Seas to the east. The Australian Capital Territory is an enclave within the state. New South Wales' state capital is Sydney, which is also Australia's most populous city. In March 2019, the population of New South Wales was over 8 million, making it Australia's most populous state. Just under two-thirds of the state's population, 5.1 million, live in the Greater Sydney area. Inhabitants of New South Wales are referred to as New South Welshmen.

Contents

History

The city of Newcastle, the division's namesake Newcastle view.jpg
The city of Newcastle, the division's namesake

The division was proclaimed in 1900, and was one of the original 65 divisions to be contested at the first federal election. The division was named after the city of Newcastle, around which the division is centred.

1901 Australian federal election

The 1901 Australian federal election for the inaugural Parliament of Australia was held in Australia on Friday 29 March and Saturday 30 March 1901. The elections followed Federation and the establishment of the Commonwealth of Australia on 1 January 1901. All 75 seats in the Australian House of Representatives, six of which were uncontested, as well as all 36 seats in the Australian Senate, were up for election.

Newcastle, New South Wales City in New South Wales, Australia

The Newcastle metropolitan area is the second most populated area in the Australian state of New South Wales and includes the Newcastle and Lake Macquarie local government areas. It is the hub of the Greater Newcastle area which includes most parts of the local government areas of City of Newcastle, City of Lake Macquarie, City of Cessnock, City of Maitland and Port Stephens Council.

It has been held by the Australian Labor Party for its entire existence. Historically, it has been one of that party's safest non-metropolitan seats; the Hunter Region is one of the few country regions where Labor consistently does well. Labor has never tallied less than 58 percent of the Two-party-preferred vote in a general election, and has only come close to losing it once, when it tallied 53 percent in a 1935 by-election. It is the only original division to be held by just one party since the first federal election.

Hunter Region Region in New South Wales, Australia

The Hunter Region, also commonly known as the Hunter Valley, is a region of New South Wales, Australia, extending from approximately 120 km (75 mi) to 310 km (193 mi) north of Sydney. It contains the Hunter River and its tributaries with highland areas to the north and south. Situated at the northern end of the Sydney Basin bioregion, the Hunter Valley is one of the largest river valleys on the NSW coast, and is most commonly known for its wineries and coal industry.

Two-party-preferred vote

In Australian politics, the two-party-preferred vote is the result of an election or opinion poll after preferences have been distributed to the highest two candidates, who in some cases can be independents. For the purposes of TPP, the Liberal/National Coalition is usually considered a single party, with Labor being the other major party. Typically the TPP is expressed as the percentages of votes attracted by each of the two major parties, e.g. "Coalition 50%, Labor 50%", where the values include both primary votes and preferences. The TPP is an indicator of how much swing has been attained/is required to change the result, taking into consideration preferences, which may have a significant effect on the result.

A by-election was held for the Australian House of Representatives seat of Newcastle on 1 June 1935. This was triggered by the death of long-serving Labor MP David Watkins. Following Watkins' death, only Billy Hughes and Senator George Pearce remained of those elected at the first federal election in 1901.

The Division of Newcastle has had just six members since 1901, the fewest of any of the original divisions. From 1901 to 1958, the seat was held by the Watkins family. The seat's first member, David Watkins, held the seat until his death in 1935. The ensuing by-election was won by his son, David Oliver. Allan Morris' brother Peter Morris was also a Member of the House, holding the Division of Shortland, which lies immediately to the south. Charles Jones' brother Sam was the member for Waratah in the New South Wales Legislative Assembly for much of the time that he was the member. The electoral district of Waratah lay within the boundaries of the Division of Newcastle.

David Watkins (Australian politician) Australian politician

David Watkins was an Australian politician and Member of the Australian House of Representatives for Newcastle from Federation in 1901 until his death in 1935. His death left former Prime Minister Billy Hughes as the only remaining member of the First Parliament still in the House.

David Oliver Watkins Australian politician

David Oliver Watkins was an Australian politician. Born in Wallsend, New South Wales, he attended public schools in Newcastle before becoming a storeman. He served in the military from 1915–17. In 1935, following the death of his father, politician David Watkins, Watkins succeeded him as the Labor member for Newcastle in the Australian House of Representatives. He held the seat until his retirement in 1958; he died in 1971.

Allan Agapitos Morris is a former Australian politician. Born in Waratah, New South Wales, he was educated at the University of Newcastle and became a computer programmer. He served on Newcastle City Council and Shortland County Council; his brother, Peter Morris, was a Labor member of the Australian House of Representatives, representing the seat of Shortland. In 1983, Allan too was elected to the House as the Labor member for Newcastle. He held the seat until his retirement in 2001.

The seat's most prominent members were David Watkins, the second-longest serving member of the First Parliament, and Charles Jones, a minister in the Whitlam Government. The current Member, since the 2013 federal election, is Sharon Claydon.

Charles Jones (Australian politician) Australian politician and government minister

Charles Keith Jones AO was an Australian politician and government minister.

Whitlam Government federal executive government of Australia led by Prime Minister Gough Whitlam

The Whitlam Government was the federal executive government of Australia led by Prime Minister Gough Whitlam. It was made up of members of the Australian Labor Party. The government commenced when it defeated the McMahon Government in the 1972 federal election after a record 23 years of Coalition government. It concluded in historic circumstances, when it was dismissed by Governor-General Sir John Kerr as a result of the 1975 constitutional crisis and was succeeded by the Fraser Government. The Whitlam Government remains the only federal government in Australian history to be dismissed by either a monarch or viceregal representative.

2013 Australian federal election Election held on 7 September 2013

The 2013 Australianfederal election to elect the members of the 44th Parliament of Australia took place on 7 September 2013. The centre-right Liberal/National Coalition opposition led by Opposition leader Tony Abbott of the Liberal Party of Australia and Coalition partner the National Party of Australia, led by Warren Truss, defeated the incumbent centre-left Labor Party government of Prime Minister Kevin Rudd by a 18-seat 3.6 percentage point two-party swing resulting in a landslide win for the Coalition. Labor had been in government for 6 years since first being elected in the 2007 election .This election marked the end of the 6 year Rudd-Gillard Labor government and the start of the current Abbott-Turnbull-Morrison Liberal-National Coalition government. Abbott was sworn in by the Governor-General, Quentin Bryce, as Australia's new Prime Minister on 18 September 2013, along with the Abbott Ministry and the members of the House of Representatives. The 44th Parliament of Australia opened on 12 November 2013, which is taken to be the commencement of the term of members of the House of Representatives. The new senators were sworn in by the next Governor-General Peter Cosgrove on 7 July 2014, with their six-year terms commencing on 1 July.

Members

ImageMemberPartyTermNotes
  David Watkins - T. Humphrey & Co. (cropped).jpg David Watkins
(1865–1935)
Labor 29 March 1901
8 April 1935
Previously held the New South Wales Legislative Assembly seat of Wallsend. Served as Chief Government Whip in the House under Fisher. Died in office. Son was David Oliver Watkins
  David Oliver Watkins.jpg David Oliver Watkins
(1896–1971)
Labor 1 June 1935
14 October 1958
Retired. Father was David Watkins
  CharlesJones1967.jpg Charles Jones
(1917–2003)
Labor 22 November 1958
4 February 1983
Served as minister under Whitlam. Retired
  No image.svg Allan Morris
(1940–)
Labor 5 March 1983
8 October 2001
Retired
  No image.svg Sharon Grierson
(1951–)
Labor 10 November 2001
5 August 2013
Retired
  No image.svg Sharon Claydon
(1964–)
Labor 7 September 2013
present
Incumbent

Election results

2019 Australian federal election: Newcastle [1]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Labor Sharon Claydon 47,13745.73−1.39
Liberal Katrina Wark30,10729.21−0.71
Greens John Mackenzie16,03815.56+1.90
United Australia Geoffrey Scully3,4713.37+3.37
Animal Justice Darren Brollo3,3003.20+3.20
Christian Democrats Pam Wise1,9281.87−0.28
Great Australian B. J. Futter1,0861.05+1.05
Total formal votes103,06794.49−0.77
Informal votes6,0145.51+0.77
Turnout 109,08192.72+0.80
Two-party-preferred result
Labor Sharon Claydon 65,78463.83−0.01
Liberal Katrina Wark37,28336.17+0.01
Labor hold Swing −0.01

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References

  1. Newcastle, NSW, Tally Room 2019, Australian Electoral Commission.

Coordinates: 32°50′28″S151°45′11″E / 32.841°S 151.753°E / -32.841; 151.753