Division of Dalley

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Dalley
Australian House of Representatives Division
Created1901
Abolished1969
Namesake William Dalley

The Division of Dalley was an Australian Electoral Division in New South Wales. The division was created in 1900 and was one of the original 75 divisions contested at the first federal election. It was named for the colonial politician William Dalley and was located in the inner suburbs of Sydney, including Balmain, Glebe and Leichhardt. It was abolished in 1969.

For most of its history it was a safe seat for the Australian Labor Party, which held it without interruption from 1910 onward. In the 1930s it was a stronghold of the radical Premier of New South Wales, Jack Lang. Its most prominent member was Ted Theodore, who was deputy prime minister and treasurer in the Scullin government, having previously been Premier of Queensland. He was defeated in 1931 by the Lang follower and later Deputy Leader of Australian Labor Party (Non-Communist) Sol Rosevear, who was Speaker during the Curtin and Chifley governments.

Members

ImageMemberPartyTermNotes
  William Henry Wilks.jpg William Wilks
(1863–1940)
Free Trade 29 March 1901
1906
Previously held the New South Wales Legislative Assembly seat of Balmain North. Served as Chief Government Whip in the House under Reid. Lost seat
  Anti-Socialist 1906 –
26 May 1909
  Commonwealth Liberal 26 May 1909 –
13 April 1910
  Robert Howe.jpg Robert Howe
(1861–1915)
Labor 13 April 1910
2 April 1915
Died in office
  William Mahony.jpg William Mahony
(1877–1962)
Labor 6 May 1915
18 January 1927
Resigned in order to retire from politics
  Ted Theodore 1931.jpg Ted Theodore
(1884–1950)
Labor 26 February 1927
19 December 1931
Previously held the Legislative Assembly of Queensland seat of Woothakata and Queensland Premier. Served as deputy prime minister under Scullin. Lost seat
  Sol Rosevear.jpg Sol Rosevear
(1892–1953)
Labor (NSW) 19 December 1931
February 1936
Served as Speaker during the Curtin, Forde and Chifley Governments. Died in office
  Labor February 1936 –
2 May 1940
  Labor (Non-Communist) 2 May 1940 –
February 1941
  Labor February 1941 –
21 March 1953
  Arthur Greenup.jpg Arthur Greenup
(1902-1980)
Labor 9 May 1953
4 November 1955
Previously held the New South Wales Legislative Assembly seat of Newtown-Annandale. Lost preselection and retired
  WilliamO'Connor1962.jpg William O'Connor
(1910–1987)
Labor 10 December 1955
29 September 1969
Previously held the Division of Martin. Retired after Dalley was abolished in 1969

Election results

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