Division of Hunter

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Hunter
Australian House of Representatives Division
Division of HUNTER 2016.png
Division of Hunter in New South Wales, as of the 2016 federal election.
Created1901
MP Joel Fitzgibbon
Party Labor
Namesake John Hunter
Electors 121,560 (2019)
Area10,640 km2 (4,108.1 sq mi)
DemographicRural

The Division of Hunter is an Australian electoral division in the state of New South Wales. The division was proclaimed in 1900, and was one of the original 65 divisions to be contested at the first federal election. The division was named after Captain John Hunter, the second Governor of New South Wales. It covers rural, regional and suburban areas centred on the Hunter Region, including the towns of Singleton, Muswellbrook and Cessnock. It also extends into parts of Greater Newcastle, covering suburbs such as Cameron Park, Edgeworth, Toronto and Morisset.

Divisions of the Australian House of Representatives federal electorates in Australia

In Australia, electoral districts for the Australian House of Representatives are called divisions or more commonly referred to as electorates or seats. There are currently 151 single-member electorates for the Australian House of Representatives.

States and territories of Australia first-level subdivision of Australia

The states and territories are the first-level administrative divisions of the Commonwealth of Australia. They are the second level of government in Australia, located between the federal and local government tiers.

New South Wales State of Australia

New South Wales is a state on the east coast of Australia. It borders Queensland to the north, Victoria to the south, and South Australia to the west. Its coast borders the Tasman Sea to the east. The Australian Capital Territory is an enclave within the state. New South Wales' state capital is Sydney, which is also Australia's most populous city. In September 2018, the population of New South Wales was over 8 million, making it Australia's most populous state. Just under two-thirds of the state's population, 5.1 million, live in the Greater Sydney area. Inhabitants of New South Wales are referred to as New South Welshmen.

Contents

The current member since the 1996 federal election, is Joel Fitzgibbon, a member of the Australian Labor Party.

1996 Australian federal election election

The 1996 Australian federal election was held to determine the members of the 38th Parliament of Australia. It was held on 2 March 1996. All 148 seats of the House of Representatives and 40 seats of the 76-seat Senate were up for election. The centre-right Liberal/National Coalition led by Opposition Leader John Howard of the Liberal Party and coalition partner Tim Fischer of the National Party defeated the incumbent centre-left Australian Labor Party government led by Prime Minister Paul Keating.

Joel Fitzgibbon Australian politician

Joel Andrew Fitzgibbon is an Australian politician and Australian Labor Party (ALP) member of the Australian House of Representatives since March 1996, representing the Division of Hunter in New South Wales. Fitzgibbon is aligned with the ALP's Centre Unity faction in NSW. From December 2007 to June 2009 he was the Minister for Defence in the First Rudd Ministry. He resigned from cabinet in June 2009, following a series of controversies. In July 2013, following Kevin Rudd's election as Labor Leader, he was appointed the Minister for Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry in the Second Rudd Ministry.

Australian Labor Party Political party in Australia

The Australian Labor Party is a major centre-left political party in Australia. The party has been in opposition at the federal level since the 2013 election. The party is a federal party with branches in each state and territory. Labor is in government in the states of Victoria, Queensland, Western Australia, and in both the Australian Capital Territory and Northern Territory. The party competes against the Liberal/National Coalition for political office at the federal and state levels. It is the oldest political party in Australia.

History

The seat has been in Labor hands since 1910, and for most of that time has been reasonably safe for that party. The Hunter Region has been one of the few areas outside of capital cities where Labor has consistently done well. Among its notable members have been first Prime Minister, Sir Edmund Barton, former Labor Leaders Matthew Charlton and Dr H. V. Evatt, and Joel Fitzgibbon, who was a minister in the first and second Rudd governments.

1910 Australian federal election

Federal elections were held in Australia on 13 April 1910. All 75 seats in the House of Representatives, and 18 of the 36 seats in the Senate were up for election. The incumbent Commonwealth Liberal Party led by Prime Minister Alfred Deakin was defeated by the opposition Labour Party, led by Andrew Fisher.

Prime Minister of Australia executive head of the Government of Australia

The Prime Minister of Australia is the head of government of Australia. The individual who holds the office is the most senior Minister of State, the leader of the Federal Cabinet. The Prime Minister also has the responsibility of administering the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet, and is the chair of the National Security Committee and the Council of Australian Governments. The office of Prime Minister is not mentioned in the Constitution of Australia but exists through Westminster political convention. The individual who holds the office is commissioned by the Governor-General of Australia and at the Governor-General's pleasure subject to the Constitution of Australia and constitutional conventions.

Edmund Barton Australian politician, first Prime Minister of Australia and founding justice of the High Court of Australia

Sir Edmund "Toby" Barton, was an Australian politician and judge who served as the first Prime Minister of Australia, in office from 1901 to 1903. He resigned to become a founding member of the High Court of Australia, where he served until his death.

The seat has been held by two father-son combinations. Rowley James held the seat from 1928 to 1958 before giving it up for Evatt, who was in danger of losing his Sydney-area seat of Barton and wanted a friendlier seat in which to run. Evatt was succeeded after one term by Rowley James' son, Bert, who held it until 1980. Eric Fitzgibbon won the seat in 1984, handing it to his son and current member, Joel, in 1996.

Rowley James Australian politician

Rowland "Rowley" James was an Australian politician and coalminer. Born at Lambton, New South Wales, the son of a Welshman, he was educated at a government school and worked in the mines for twenty-five years. On 24 July 1912, he married Gladys Mary Davies. Having served the Collie River District Miners' Union of Workers, he returned to New South Wales to become part of the Australian Coal and Shale Employees' Federation.

1928 Australian federal election

Federal elections were held in Australia on 17 November 1928. All 75 seats in the House of Representatives and 19 of the 36 seats in the Senate were up for election. The incumbent Nationalist–Country coalition, led by Prime Minister Stanley Bruce, defeated the opposition Labor Party led by James Scullin.

1958 Australian federal election

Federal elections were held in Australia on 22 November 1958. All 122 seats in the House of Representatives and 32 of the 60 seats in the Senate were up for election. The incumbent Liberal–Country coalition led by Prime Minister Robert Menzies defeated the opposition Labor Party, led by H. V. Evatt.

Two-party vote count

Hunter had became somewhat marginal in the 1980's when much of its territory was shifted to the newly created Charlton. Since 1990, Labor has never tallied less than 53 percent of the two-party-preferred vote. Labor's worst two-party-preferred vote was 2.4% in 1984 and best result when challenged by an opposing center-right candidate was 80.6% in 1961.

Division of Charlton Australian federal electoral division

The Division of Charlton was an Australian electoral division in the state of New South Wales. The division was created in 1984 and is named for Matthew Charlton, who was Leader of the Australian Labor Party 1922–28.

1990 Australian federal election election

Federal elections were held in Australia on 24 March 1990. All 148 seats in the House of Representatives and 40 seats in the 76-member Senate were up for election. The incumbent Australian Labor Party led by Bob Hawke defeated the opposition Liberal Party of Australia led by Andrew Peacock with coalition partner the National Party of Australia led by Charles Blunt. The election saw the reelection of a Hawke government, the fourth successive term.

Two-party-preferred vote

In Australian politics, the two-party-preferred vote is the result of an election or opinion poll after preferences have been distributed to the highest two candidates, who in some cases can be independents. For the purposes of TPP, the Liberal/National Coalition is usually considered a single party, with Labor being the other major party. Typically the TPP is expressed as the percentages of votes attracted by each of the two major parties, e.g. "Coalition 45%, Labor 55%", where the values include both primary votes and preferences. The TPP is an indicator of how much swing has been attained/is required to change the result, taking into consideration preferences, which may have a significant effect on the result.

First-preference vote count

Labor's worst first-preference vote was in 2019, when the current member won only 37.5% of the primary vote; the previous 100-year worst being 44.5% in 2013, again by the incumbent member. Labor's best primary vote was a thumping 76.9% in 1946. As of 2019, the Division of Hunter is considered a marginal seat.

First-preference votes

In certain ranked-voting systems, a first-preference vote is the individual voter's first choice amongst (possibly) many. In certain ranked systems such as Instant-Runoff Voting or Single Transferable Vote, the first-preference for candidate(s)/option(s) are initially counted, and then, if necessary, this criterion is altered to allow for proportionality, and to carry surplus and/or ineffective votes to second and subsequent options depending on the system involved.

2019 Australian federal election Election for the 46th Parliament of Australia

The 2019 Australian federal election was held on Saturday 18 May 2019 to elect members of the 46th Parliament of Australia. The election had been called following the dissolution of the 45th Parliament as elected at the 2016 double dissolution federal election. All 151 seats in the House of Representatives and 40 of the 76 seats in the Senate were up for election.

2013 Australian federal election Election held on 7 September 2013

A federal election to determine the members of the 44th Parliament of Australia took place on 7 September 2013. The centre-right Liberal/National Coalition opposition led by Opposition leader Tony Abbott of the Liberal Party of Australia and Coalition partner the National Party of Australia, led by Warren Truss, defeated the incumbent centre-left Labor Party government of Prime Minister Kevin Rudd by a 17-seat 3.6 percentage point two-party swing. Labor had been in government since the 2007 election. Abbott was sworn in by the Governor-General, Quentin Bryce, as Australia's 28th Prime Minister on 18 September 2013, along with the Abbott Ministry and the members of the House of Representatives. The 44th Parliament of Australia opened on 12 November 2013, which is taken to be the commencement of the term of members of the House of Representatives. The new senators were sworn in by the next Governor-General Peter Cosgrove on 7 July 2014, with their six-year terms commencing on 1 July.

2015 proposed abolition

In 2015 the Australian Electoral Commission announced plans to abolish the federation seat of Hunter. Due to changing populations, overall, New South Wales was to lose a seat while Western Australia was to gain an extra seat. Electors in the north of Hunter were to join New England. The roughly 40 percent remainder were to become part of Paterson, with the Liberal margin calculated to be notionally reduced from 9.8 percent to just 0.5 percent as a result. Since the Commission's guidelines require it to preserve the names of original electorates where possible, the commission proposed renaming Charlton to Hunter. [1] [2] [3]

The final plan, however, saw Charlton abolished, with Hunter pushed slightly eastward to absorb much of Charlton's former territory. [4] While most of the new Hunter's voters come from the old Charlton, as previously mentioned, Commission guidelines required the name of Hunter to be retained. [5] The Labor incumbent for Charlton, Pat Conroy, brokered a factional deal to contest neighbouring Shortland in order to allow Fitzgibbon to continue to represent Hunter.

Members

MemberPartyTerm
  (Sir) Edmund Barton Protectionist 1901–1903
  Frank Liddell Free Trade 1903–1906
  Anti-Socialist 1906–1909
  Commonwealth Liberal 1909–1910
  Matthew Charlton Labor 1910–1928
  Rowley James Labor 1928–1931
  Lang Labor 1931–1936
  Labor 1936–1958
  H. V. Evatt Labor 1958–1960
  Bert James Labor 1960–1980
  Bob Brown Labor 1980–1984
  Eric Fitzgibbon Labor 1984–1996
  Joel Fitzgibbon Labor 1996–present

Election results

2019 Australian federal election: Hunter [6]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Labor Joel Fitzgibbon 38,33137.57−14.22
National Josh Angus23,94223.47−2.87
One Nation Stuart Bonds22,02921.59+21.59
Greens Janet Murray7,0076.87−0.22
United Australia Paul Davies4,4074.32+4.32
Animal Justice James Murphy3,2673.20+3.20
Christian Democrats Richard Stretton2,3562.31−1.07
Socialist Equality Max Boddy6870.67+0.67
Total formal votes102,02691.03−1.09
Informal votes10,0498.97+1.09
Turnout 112,07592.29−0.04
Two-party-preferred result
Labor Joel Fitzgibbon 54,05052.98−9.48
National Josh Angus47,97647.02+9.48
Labor hold Swing −9.48

Results are not final. Last updated 5:45pm AEST on 14 June 2019.

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References

  1. "Australian Electoral Commission to abolish Federal NSW seat of Hunter". ABC News . Australia. 16 October 2015.
  2. "Draft federal redistribution of New South Wales". Poll Bludger, Crikey . 16 October 2015.
  3. "Labor's Joel Fitzgibbon loses his seat in redistribution by Australian Electoral Commission". The Age . 16 October 2015.
  4. Green, Antony. "Hunter". ABC Election Guide 2016. Australian Broadcasting Corporation.
  5. "NSW federal redistribution 2015". ABC News . Australia.
  6. Hunter, NSW, Tally Room 2019, Australian Electoral Commission.

Coordinates: 32°22′30″S150°46′41″E / 32.375°S 150.778°E / -32.375; 150.778