1980 Australian federal election

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1980 Australian federal election
Flag of Australia (converted).svg
  1977 18 October 1980 1983  

All 125 seats in the House of Representatives
63 seats were needed for a majority in the House
34 (of the 64) seats in the Senate
 First partySecond party
  MalcolmFraser1982.JPEG Bill Hayden on 29.5.1990.jpg
Leader Malcolm Fraser Bill Hayden
Party Liberal/NCP coalition Labor
Leader since 21 March 1975 22 December 1977
Leader's seat Wannon (Vic.) Oxley (Qld.)
Last election86 seats38 seats
Seats won74 seats51 seats
Seat changeDecrease2.svg12Increase2.svg13
Percentage50.37%49.63%
SwingDecrease2.svg4.23%Increase2.svg4.23%

Australia 1980 federal election.png
Popular vote by state and territory with graphs indicating the number of seats won. As this is an IRV election, seat totals are not determined by popular vote by state or territory but instead via results in each electorate.

Prime Minister before election

Malcolm Fraser
Liberal/NCP coalition

Subsequent Prime Minister

Malcolm Fraser
Liberal/NCP coalition

The 1980 Australian federal election was held in Australia on 18 October 1980. All 125 seats in the House of Representatives and 34 of the 64 seats in the Senate were up for election. The incumbent Liberal–NCP coalition government, led by Prime Minister Malcolm Fraser, was elected to a third term with a much reduced majority, defeating the opposition Labor Party led by Bill Hayden. This was the last federal election victory for the Coalition until the 1996 election

Contents

Future Prime Minister Bob Hawke and future opposition leader and future Deputy Prime Minister Kim Beazley entered parliament at this election.

Issues and significance

The Fraser Government had lost a degree of popularity within the electorate by 1980. The economy had been performing poorly since the 1973 oil shock. However, Hayden was not seen as having great electoral prospects. [1] Perhaps as evidence of this, then ACTU President Bob Hawke (elected to Parliament in the election as the Member for Wills) and then Premier of New South Wales Neville Wran featured heavily in the campaign, almost as heavily as Hayden.

Results

House of Representatives

Government (74)
Coalition
Liberal (54)
NCP (19)
CLP (1)

Opposition (51)
Labor (51) Australian House of Representatives elected members, 1980.svg
Government (74)
Coalition
     Liberal (54)
     NCP (19)
     CLP (1)

Opposition (51)
     Labor (51)
    House of Reps (IRV) — 1980–83—Turnout 94.35% (CV) — Informal 2.45%
    PartyVotes%SwingSeatsChange
      Liberal–NCP coalition 3,853,58546.40–1.7174–12
      Liberal 3,108,51737.43−0.6654−13
      National Country  726,2638.74−1.0719+1
      Country Liberal 18,8050.23+0.0210
      Labor 3,749,56545.15+5.5051+13
      Democrats 546,0326.57−2.8100
      Democratic Labor 25,4560.31−1.1200
      Progress 17,0400.21−0.3900
      Socialist Workers 16,9200.20+0.2000
      Communist 11,3180.14−0.0400
      Socialist Labour 10,0510.12+0.1200
      NPWA 8,9150.11+0.1100
      Progressive Conservative 3,6200.04+0.0400
      United Christian 2,0500.02+0.0200
      Imperial British Conservative 1,5150.02+0.0200
      Australia 7010.01+0.0100
      Marijuana 4860.01+0.0100
      Independent 58,3380.70+0.0700
     Total8,305,633  125+1
    Two-party-preferred (estimated)
      Coalition WIN50.40−4.2074−12
      Labor  49.60+4.2051+13
    Popular Vote
    Labor
    45.15%
    Liberal
    37.43%
    National
    8.97%
    Democrats
    6.57%
    Other
    1.88%
    Two Party Preferred Vote
    Coalition
    50.40%
    Labor
    49.60%
    Parliament Seats
    Coalition
    59.20%
    Labor
    40.80%

    Senate

    Government (31)
Coalition
Liberal (27)
NCP (3)
CLP (1)

Opposition (27)
Labor (27)

Crossbench (6)
Democrats (5)
Independent (1) Australian Senate elected members, 1980.svg
    Government (31)
    Coalition
         Liberal (27)
         NCP (3)
         CLP (1)

    Opposition (27)
         Labor (27)

    Crossbench (6)
         Democrats (5)
         Independent (1)
      Senate (STV) — 1980–83—Turnout 94.35% (CV) — Informal 9.65%
      PartyVotes%SwingSeats WonSeats HeldChange
        Liberal–NCP coalition 3,352,52143.58–1.981531–3
       Liberal–NCP joint ticket1,971,52825.63−8.634**
        Liberal 1,011,28913.15+2.559270
        National Country 341,9784.45+3.9513–3
        Country Liberal 19,1290.25+0.04110
        Labor 3,250,18742.25+5.4915270
        Democrats 711,8059.25−1.8835+3
        Call to Australia 118,5351.54+0.42000
        Democratic Labor 31,7660.41–1.26000
        Marijuana 28,3370.37–0.23000
        Australia 27,4040.36+0.25000
        Socialist 15,4120.20–0.38000
        Progress 8,2520.11–1.08000
        NPWA 7,5970.10+0.10000
       Other56,1280.73+0.73000
        Independent 86,7701.13–0.60110
       Total7,692,364  3464
      Notes

        Seats changing hands

        SeatPre-1980SwingPost-1980
        PartyMemberMarginMarginMemberParty
        Ballarat, Vic  Liberal Jim Short 7.58.20.7 John Mildren Labor 
        Brisbane, Qld  Liberal Peter Johnson 3.25.01.8 Manfred Cross Labor 
        Canberra, ACT  Liberal John Haslem 1.06.75.7 Ros Kelly Labor 
        Henty, Vic  Liberal Ken Aldred 2.75.52.8 Joan Child Labor 
        Holt, Vic  Liberal William Yates 1.88.76.9 Michael Duffy Labor 
        Hotham, Vic  Liberal Roger Johnston 1.75.74.0 Lewis Kent Labor 
        Isaacs, Vic  Liberal Bill Burns 7.39.11.8 David Charles Labor 
        Kalgoorlie, WA  Liberal Mick Cotter 8.58.10.6 Graeme Campbell Labor 
        La Trobe, Vic  Liberal Marshall Baillieu 0.83.12.3 Peter Milton Labor 
        Lilley, Qld  Liberal Kevin Cairns 6.06.80.8 Elaine Darling Labor 
        Macquarie, NSW  Liberal Reg Gillard 1.74.52.8 Ross Free Labor 
        McMillan, Vic  Liberal Barry Simon 4.86.21.4 Barry Cunningham Labor 
        Riverina, NSW  Labor John FitzPatrick 0.10.60.5 Noel Hicks National Country 
        St George, NSW  Liberal Maurice Neil 2.08.16.1 Bill Morrison Labor 
        Swan, WA  Liberal John Martyr 0.58.17.6 Kim Beazley Labor 

        Aftermath

        The Gallagher Index result: 8.61 1980 Election Australia Gallagher Index.png
        The Gallagher Index result: 8.61

        In the election, Labor finished only 0.8 percent behind the Coalition on the two-party vote—a four-percent swing from 1977. However, due to the uneven nature of the swing, Labor came up 12 seats short of a majority, giving the Coalition a third term in government. Hayden, however, did manage to regain much of what Labor had lost in the previous two elections. Notably, he managed to more than halve Fraser's majority, from 48 seats at dissolution to 23.

        In the subsequent term, the government delivered budgets significantly in deficit, and Fraser was challenged for the Liberal leadership by Andrew Peacock. The Australian Democrats made further gains, winning the balance of power in the Senate. From July 1981 (when those senators elected at the 1980 election took up their positions) no Federal Government in Australia had a Senate majority until the Howard Government won such a majority in 2004.

        See also

        Notes

        1. "australianpolitics.com". australianpolitics.com. Retrieved 30 July 2016.

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        References