1934 Australian federal election

Last updated

1934 Australian federal election
Flag of Australia (converted).svg
  1931 15 September 1934 1937  

All 74 seats of the Australian House of Representatives
38 seats were needed for a majority in the House
18 (of the 36) seats of the Australian Senate
 First partySecond party
  Joseph Lyons.jpg James H. Scullin.jpg
Leader Joseph Lyons James Scullin
Party United Australia Labor
Leader since7 May 1931 26 April 1928
Leader's seat Wilmot (Tas.) Yarra (Vic.)
Last election39 seats14 seats
Seats won33 seats18 seats
Seat changeDecrease2.svg6Increase2.svg4
Percentage53.50%46.50%
SwingDecrease2.svg5.00%Increase2.svg5.00%

 Third partyFourth party
  Earle Page - Falk Studios (cropped).jpg JackLang.jpg
Leader Earle Page Jack Lang
PartyCountry Labor (NSW)
Leader since5 April 192131 July 1923
Leader's seat Cowper (NSW)Did not run
Last election16 seats4 seats
Seats won14 seats9 seats
Seat changeDecrease2.svg2Increase2.svg5
Percentage12.61%14.37%
SwingIncrease2.svg0.36%Increase2.svg3.80%

Australia 1934 federal election.png
Popular vote by state with graphs indicating the number of seats won. As this is an IRV election, seat totals are not determined by popular vote by state but instead via results in each electorate.

Prime Minister before election

Joseph Lyons
United Australia

Subsequent Prime Minister

Joseph Lyons
United Australia

The 1934 Australian federal election was held in Australia on 15 September 1934. All 74 seats in the House of Representatives, and 18 of the 36 seats in the Senate were up for election. The incumbent United Australia Party led by Prime Minister of Australia Joseph Lyons formed a minority government, with 33 out of 74 seats in the House.

Contents

The opposition Australian Labor Party (ALP) led by James Scullin saw its share of the primary vote fall to an even lower number than in the 1931 election, due to the Lang Labor split. However, it was able to pick up an extra four seats on preferences and therefore improve on its position.

Almost two months after the election, the UAP entered into a coalition with the Country Party, led by Earle Page.

Future Prime Ministers Robert Menzies and John McEwen both entered parliament at this election.

Results

House of Representatives

House of Reps (IRV) — 1934–37—Turnout 95.17% (CV) — Informal 3.44%
PartyVotes%SwingSeatsChangeNote
  United Australia Party 1,170,97832.973.13286
  Australian Labor Party 952,25126.810.2818+4(1 elected
unopposed)
  Australian Labor Party (NSW) 510,48014.37+3.809+5
  Country Party 447,96812.61+0.36142
  Social Credit Party 166,5894.69*00
  Liberal & Country League (SA)142,5834.01*5+5
  Communist Party of Australia 47,4991.3400
 Independents113,0373.185.0401
 Total3,551,385  741

The member for Northern Territory, Adair Blain (Independent), had voting rights only for issues affecting the Territory, and so is not included in this table.

Popular Vote
United Australia
33.17%
Labor
26.81%
Labor (NSW)
14.37%
Country
12.61%
Social Credit
4.69%
LCL
4.01%
Independent
3.18%
Communist
1.34%
Parliament Seats
Coalition
56.76%
Labor
24.32%
Labor (NSW)
12.16%
LCL
6.76%

Senate

Senate (P BV) — 1934–37—Turnout 95.03% (CV) — Informal 11.35%
PartyVotes%SwingSeats WonSeats HeldChange
  Australian Labor Party 923,15128.081.18037
  United Australia Party 679,42220.664.591026+5
 UAP/Country (Joint Ticket)599,72318.2411.926
  Country Party 470,28314.30*27+2
  Australian Labor Party (NSW) 435,04513.23+1.12000
  Social Credit Party 91,5962.79*000
  Communist Party of Australia 73,5062.24+1.30000
  Independents 15,1050.461.81000
 Total3,287,831  1836

Seats changing hands

SeatPre-1934SwingPost-1934
PartyMemberMarginMarginMemberParty
Barker, SA  United Australia Malcolm Cameron N/A6.418.7 Archie Cameron Country 
Bass, Tas  United Australia Allan Guy 14.514.80.3 Claude Barnard Labor 
Batman, Vic  United Australia Samuel Dennis 14.514.80.3 Frank Brennan Labor 
Corangamite, Vic  Country William Gibson N/A7.215.7 Geoffrey Street United Australia 
Darling, NSW  Labor Arthur Blakeley N/A63.513.5 Joe Clark Labor (NSW) 
Denison, Tas  United Australia Arthur Hutchin 5.05.30.3 Gerald Mahoney Labor 
Franklin, Tas  United Australia Archibald Blacklow 13.015.42.4 Charles Frost Labor 
Fremantle, WA  United Australia William Watson 5.56.61.1 John Curtin Labor 
Maribyrnong, Vic  United Australia James Fenton 0.47.16.7 Arthur Drakeford Labor 
Northern Territory, NT  Labor H. G. Nelson N/A7.51.8 Adair Blain Independent 
Werriwa, NSW  Country Walter McNicoll 1.73.22.5 Bert Lazzarini Labor (NSW) 

See also

Notes

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    References