1970 Australian Senate election

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Elections were held on 21 November 1970 to elect 32 of the 60 seats in the Australian Senate. This is the most recent occasion on which a Senate election was held with no accompanying election to the House of Representatives; the two election cycles had been out of synchronisation since 1963. The governing Coalition and the opposition Australian Labor Party won 13 and 14 seats respectively, resulting in a total of 26 seats each, while the Democratic Labor Party and three independents (two newly elected) held the remaining seats.

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Senate (STV) — 1970–74—Turnout 93.98% (CV) — Informal 9.41%
PartyVotes%SwingSeats WonSeats HeldChange
  Labor 2,376,21542.22–2.811426–1
  Liberal–Country coalition (total)2,149,02338.18–4.591326–2
 Liberal–Country joint ticket1,098,13419.51–14.314**
  Liberal 991,47317.61+9.478210
  Country 59,4161.06+0.2415–2
  Democratic Labor 625,14211.11+1.3435+1
  Australia 163,3432.90+2.90000
  Pensioner Power 28,9830.51+0.51000
  Defence of Government Schools 27,7960.49+0.49000
  National Socialist 24,0170.43+0.43000
  Independent / Other 234,3144.16+2.4623+2
 Total5,628,833  3260
Notes

See also

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