2001 Australian federal election

Last updated

2001 Australian federal election
Flag of Australia (converted).svg
  1998 10 November 2001 (2001-11-10) 2004  

All 150 seats in the House of Representatives
76 seats were needed for a majority in the House
40 (of the 76) seats in the Senate
Registered12,054,664
Turnout94.9%
 First partySecond party
  Howard John BANNER.jpg Kim Beazley crop.jpg
Leader John Howard Kim Beazley
Party Liberal/National coalition Labor
Leader since 30 January 1995 (1995-01-30) 19 March 1996 (1996-03-19)
Leader's seat Bennelong (NSW) Brand (WA)
Last election80 seats67 seats
Seats won82 seats65 seats
Seat changeIncrease2.svg2Decrease2.svg2
Popular vote5,846,2895,627,785
Percentage50.95%49.05%
SwingIncrease2.svg1.93Decrease2.svg1.93

Australia 2001 federal election.png
Popular vote by state and territory with graphs indicating the number of seats won. As this is an IRV election, seat totals are not determined by popular vote by state or territory but instead via results in each electorate.

Prime Minister before election

John Howard
Liberal/National coalition

Subsequent Prime Minister

John Howard
Liberal/National coalition

The 2001 Australian federal election was held in Australia on 10 November 2001. All 150 seats in the House of Representatives and 40 seats in the 76-member Senate were up for election. The incumbent Liberal Party of Australia led by Prime Minister of Australia John Howard and coalition partner the National Party of Australia led by John Anderson defeated the opposition Australian Labor Party led by Kim Beazley.

Contents

Results

House of Representatives results

Government (82)
Coalition

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Liberal (68)

National (13)

CLP (1)

Opposition (65)

Labor (65)

Crossbench (3)

Independent (3)
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Government (82)
Coalition
  Liberal (68)
  National (13)
  CLP (1)

Opposition (65)
  Labor (65)

Crossbench (3)
  Independent (3)
    The disproportionality of the lower house in the 2004 election was 8.67 according to the Gallagher Index, mainly between the Liberal and Green Parties. 2004 Election Australia Gallagher Index.png
    The disproportionality of the lower house in the 2004 election was 8.67 according to the Gallagher Index, mainly between the Liberal and Green Parties.
    The disproportionality of the lower house in the 2001 election was 9.43 according to the Gallagher Index, mainly between the Coalition and Labor Parties. 2001 Election Australia Gallagher Index.png
    The disproportionality of the lower house in the 2001 election was 9.43 according to the Gallagher Index, mainly between the Coalition and Labor Parties.
    2001 Australian House.svg
    House of Reps (IRV) — 2001–04 – Turnout 94.85% (CV) — Informal 4.82%
    PartyVotes%SwingSeatsChange
      Liberal–National coalition 4,924,95942.92+3.4182+2
      Liberal 4,244,07236.99+3.1068+4
      National 643,9265.61+0.3213−3
      Country Liberal 36,9610.32–0.001+1
      Labor 4,341,42037.84−2.2665−2
      Democrats 620,1975.41+0.2800
      Greens 569,0744.96+2.8200
      One Nation 498,0324.34−4.0900
      Christian Democrats 69,2940.60+0.0200
      Unity 24,6530.21−0.5800
      Citizens Electoral Council 18,3520.16+0.0900
      Liberals for Forests 16,0420.14+0.1400
      No GST 14,1640.12+0.1000
      Against Further Immigration 12,0330.10+0.1000
      Save the ADI Site 6,0290.05+0.0500
      Progressive Labour 4,4670.04−0.0200
      Lower Excise Fuel and Beer 4,2920.04+0.0400
      HEMP 3,2770.03+0.0300
      Curtin Labor Alliance 2,4960.02+0.0200
      Non-Custodial Parents 7690.01+0.0100
      Fishing 7200.01+0.0100
      Tasmania First 6210.01−0.0300
      Outdoor Recreation 4850.00+0.0000
      Independents 332,1182.89+0.953+2
     Total11,474,074  150
    Two-party-preferred vote
      Coalition WIN50.95+1.9382+2
      Labor  49.05−1.9365-2

    Independents: Peter Andren, Tony Windsor, Bob Katter

    Popular Vote
    Labor
    37.84%
    Liberal
    37.40%
    National
    5.61%
    Democrats
    5.51%
    Greens
    4.96%
    One Nation
    4.34%
    CLP
    0.32%
    Independents
    2.71%
    Other
    1.41%
    Two Party Preferred Vote
    Coalition
    50.95%
    Labor
    49.05%
    Parliament Seats
    Coalition
    54.67%
    Labor
    43.33%
    Independents
    2.00%

    Senate results

    Government (35)
Coalition

Liberal (31)

National (3)

CLP (1)

Opposition (28)

Labor (28)

Crossbench (12)

Democrats (8)

Greens (2)

One Nation (1)

Independent (2) Australian Senate elected members, 2001.svg
    Government (35)
    Coalition
      Liberal (31)
      National (3)
      CLP (1)

    Opposition (28)
      Labor (28)

    Crossbench (12)
      Democrats (8)
      Greens (2)
      One Nation (1)
      Independent (2)
      2001 Australian Senate.svg
      Senate (STV GV) — Turnout 95.20% (CV) — Informal 3.89% [1]
      PartyVotes %SwingSeats wonTotal seatsChange
        Liberal/National Coalition 4,641,47739.92+4.1019350
        Australian Labor Party 3,990,99734.32-2.9914280
        Australian Democrats 843,1307.25-1.2048-1
        One Nation 644,3645.54-3.44010
        Australian Greens 574,5434.94+2.2222+1
        National Party of Australia (Qld, WA)222,8601.92+0.06100
        Christian Democratic Party 129,9661.12+0.03000
        liberals for forests 87,6720.75*000
        Progressive Labour Party 76,1500.65*000
        Democratic Labor Party 66,5470.57+0.30000
        Help End Marijuana Prohibition 63,6480.55*000
        No GST Party 50,0530.43+0.29000
        Unity Party 30,1930.26-0.57000
        The Fishing Party 27,5910.24*000
        Lower Excise Fuel and Beer Party 23,7670.20*000
        Australians Against Further Immigration 21,0120.18+0.11000
        Republican Party of Australia 9,9390.09+0.08000
        Citizens Electoral Council 8,8960.08+0.00000
        Reform the Legal System 8,1990.07*000
        Our Common Future 5,3580.05*000
        Nuclear Disarmament Party 4,5960.04-0.05000
        Non-Custodial Parents Party 4,0710.04+0.04000
        Tasmania First Party 3,8950.03-0.01000
        Curtin Labor Alliance 3,4940.03*000
        Hope Party Australia 2,9470.03*000
        Advance Australia Party 1,9360.02*000
        Taxi Operators' Political Service 6700.01*000
       Other79,8340.69+0.39020
       Total11,627,529  4076

      House of Representatives preference flows

      Seats changing hands

      The following table indicates seats that changed hands from one party to another at this election. It compares the election results with the previous margins, taking into account redistributions in New South Wales, Western Australia, South Australia, Tasmania and both territories. As a result, it includes the seats of Macarthur and Parramatta, which were held by Liberal members but had notional Labor margins. The table does not include the new seat of Hasluck (retained by Labor); the abolished Northern Territory, which was divided into Lingiari (retained by Labor) and Solomon (retained by the CLP); or Paterson, a Labor seat made Liberal by the redistribution

      SeatPre-2001SwingPost-2001
      PartyMemberMargin [2] MarginMemberParty
      Ballarat, Vic  Liberal Michael Ronaldson 2.775.502.73 Catherine King Labor 
      Canning, WA  Labor Jane Gerick 0.040.420.38 Don Randall Liberal 
      Dickson, Qld  Labor Cheryl Kernot 0.126.095.97 Peter Dutton Liberal 
      Dobell, NSW  LaborHon Michael Lee 1.531.910.38 Ken Ticehurst Liberal 
      Farrer, NSW  National Tim Fischer 14.18N/A16.37 Sussan Ley Liberal 
      Kennedy, Qld  National Bob Katter 11.19N/A19.69 Bob Katter Independent 
      Macarthur, NSW  Labornotional1.698.656.96 Pat Farmer Liberal 
      New England, NSW  National Stuart St. Clair 13.66N/A8.30 Tony Windsor Independent 
      Parramatta, NSW  Labornotional2.493.641.15 Ross Cameron Liberal 
      Ryan, Qld  Labor Leonie Short*0.178.798.62 Michael Johnson Liberal 

      Background

      ABC news report of the Tampa affair and its political context, October 2001.

      Throughout much of 2001, the Coalition had been trailing Labor in opinion polls, thanks to dissatisfaction with the government's economic reform programme and high petrol prices.[ citation needed ] The opposition Australian Labor Party had won a majority of the two-party-preferred vote at the previous election and had won a series of state and territory elections. Labor also recorded positive swings in two by-elections, taking the Queensland seat of Ryan and coming close in Aston.

      However following the September 11 attacks, and the Children Overboard and Tampa affairs, Polls swung strongly toward the coalition after the "Tampa" controversy but before the 11 September attacks. [3]

      In fact, voter concern with terrorism in the aftermath of the September 11 attacks in the United States was noted, with the rise in the combined primary votes of the major parties from 79.61% at the previous election in 1998, to 81.17% at this election. There would be further increases in the combined major party primary vote in 2004 and 2007.

      Another major issue was the collapse of the country's second-biggest airline Ansett Australia and the question of whether it should be given a bailout. The Coalition was opposed to any bailout because the collapse was not the government's fault.[ citation needed ] However, Labor supported a bailout, because the company's collapse was about to result in the biggest mass job loss in Australian history, whilst also arguing that the government was partially responsible for allowing Ansett to be taken over by Air New Zealand, a move which had caused Ansett's failure. [4] Although the two-party preferred result was reasonably close, the ALP recorded its lowest primary vote since 1934. [5]

      Political scientists[ who? ] have suggested that television coverage has subtly transformed the political system, with a spotlight on leaders rather than parties, thereby making for more of an American presidential-style system. In this election, television news focused on international issues, especially terrorism and asylum seekers. Minor parties were largely ignored as the two main parties monopolised the media's attention. The election was depicted as a horse-race between Howard and Beazley, with Howard running ahead and therefore being given more coverage than his Labor rival. [6]

      The election-eve Newspoll forecast that the Liberal/National Coalition would get 53 percent of the two-party-preferred vote. [7]

      See also

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      References

      1. http://elections.uwa.edu.au
      2. "Electoral Newsfile 97: Seat Status including notional seat status for SA, NSW, Tas, WA and NT Divisions". Australian Electoral Commission. 2001.
      3. Issues that swung elections: Tampa and the national security election of 2001 The Conversation
      4. "Tampa issue improves Coalition election prospects: ABC 7.30 report 4/9/2001". Abc.net.au. Archived from the original on 22 October 2008. Retrieved 13 June 2010.
      5. "australianpolitics.com". australianpolitics.com. Retrieved 13 June 2010.
      6. David Denemark, Ian Ward, and Clive Bean, Election Campaigns and Television News Coverage: The Case of the 2001 Australian Election. Australian Journal of Political Science. (2007) 42#1 pp: 89–109 online
      7. "Newspoll archive since 1987". Polling.newspoll.com.au.tmp.anchor.net.au. Archived from the original on 3 March 2016. Retrieved 30 July 2016.