List of Australian federal elections

Last updated

This article summarises results for the general elections to the Australian House of Representatives and Senate, respectively the lower and upper houses of Australia's federal bicameral legislative body, the Parliament of Australia. The number of seats has increased steadily over time, from 111 for the first election, to the current total of 227. The current federal government structure was established in 1901 by the Commonwealth of Australia Constitution Act, 1901.

Contents

Two groups have dominated politics in Australia: Labor and the Coalition, composed of the Liberal Party and the National Party (formerly the Country Party). Since the foundation of the Liberal Party in 1944, these two groups have formed every government.

Although government has been a two-party system, since 1955 Australians have consistently elected Senators from multiple parties. In the 1955 election one DLP candidate was elected (under the ALP-AC banner). Although the DLP ceased to be a force after Gough Whitlam took power in 1972, the Liberal Movement and its successor the Australian Democrats carved out their own niche. In the 1980s the NDP briefly gained election, and in the 1990s the Greens were elected to the Senate.

By 2007, the Democrats' federal parliamentary representation had disappeared, while the Greens have emerged at the national level to take their place. The Nationals' representation has also steadily declined, with their percentage of the vote hitting new lows. With the high-profile defection of Senator Julian McGauran to the Liberals in 2006, questions have been raised about the Nationals' viability, and proposals for a Liberal-National party merger have increased in strength. More recently various smaller parties or "microparties" are represented.

Summary of results

House of Representatives

The total for the party forming government after the election is bolded. Parties that have never formed government are listed under "Others".

Election
Year
Prime MinisterSummary Labour Free Trade Protectionist - Independent Other
parties
Total
seats
1st 1901 Sir Edmund Barton Edmund Barton crop.PNG The Protectionists do not gain a majority, and form a minority government with Labour support, while George Reid's Free Traders form the opposition.142831 2 75
Election
Year
Prime MinisterSummary Labour Free Trade Protectionist - Independent Other
parties
Total
seats
2nd 1903 Alfred Deakin
(1856–1919)

Chris Watson
(1867–1941)
Sir George Reid
(1845–1918)
Alfred Deakin
(1856–1919)

Alfred Deakin crop.jpg

ChrisWatsonBW crop.jpg
George Reid crop.jpg
AlfredDeakin.jpeg

Protectionist Alfred Deakin forms a minority government with Labour, but the coalition splits over a dispute on the Conciliation and Arbitration Bill.

Free Trade leader George Reid declines Government, so the Governor-General commissions Labour leader Chris Watson to form Government.

Watson resigns four months later and Free Trade forms Government under Reid, finally passing the Conciliation and Arbitration Act five months later.

Labour and the Protectionists return to Government in 1905 when Reid loses the confidence of the parliament.

232526  1 Revenue Tariff 75
Election
Year
Prime MinisterSummary Labour Anti-Socialist Protectionist - Independent Other
parties
Total
seats
3rd 1906 Alfred Deakin
(1856–1919)

Andrew Fisher
(1862–1928)
Alfred Deakin
(1856–1919)

AlfredDeakin.jpeg

Andrew Fisher 1908.jpg
Alfred Deakin 1910 (crop).tif

Protectionist Alfred Deakin forms another minority government, which remains in power largely due to the Anti-Socialists reluctance to pass a vote of no-confidence in it.

Deakin loses Labour's support in late 1908 and Andrew Fisher of the Labour Party becomes Prime Minister.

Alfred Deakin regains the Prime Ministership as leader of the new Commonwealth Liberal Party.

262716 11 Western Australian 75
Election
Year
Prime MinisterSummary Labour Commonwealth Liberal -- Independent Other
parties
Total
seats
4th 1910 Andrew Fisher
(1862–1928)
Andrew Fisher 1912 (b&w).jpg Labour wins control of the House of Representatives and the Senate under Andrew Fisher, becoming Australia's first elected federal majority.4331  1 75
Election
Year
Prime MinisterSummary Labor Commonwealth Liberal -- Independent Other
parties
Total
seats
5th 1913 Joseph Cook
(1860–1947)
Joseph Cook - Crown Studios 03.jpg The Commonwealth Liberals win a one-seat majority under Joseph Cook while Labor retains control of the Senate.3738    75
Election
Year
Prime MinisterSummary Labor Commonwealth Liberal -- Independent Other
parties
Total
seats
6th 1914 Andrew Fisher
(1862–1928)

Billy Hughes
(1862–1952)

AndrewFisher.jpg

Billy Hughes 1915.jpg

Labor forms a government under Andrew Fisher after the double dissolution election, where World War I breaks out in the middle of the campaign. Fisher resigns due to ill-health, and Labor forms government under Billy Hughes.

Hughes – a strong advocate of conscription – holds a national plebiscite on conscription to give his stance legitimacy. The plebiscite is defeated. On the 15 September 1916, Hughes is expelled from the Labor party. Hughes briefly forms the National Labor Party and forms Government, but then merges with the Commonwealth Liberal Party to form the Nationalist Party , with Hughes as Prime Minister and Joseph Cook as his deputy.

4232  1 75
Election
Year
Prime MinisterSummary Labor Nationalist -- Independent Other
parties
Total
seats
7th 1917 Billy Hughes
(1862–1952)
Billy Hughes 1916.jpg The Nationalists form a government under Billy Hughes. A second plebiscite on conscription is held and is defeated again in 1917.2253    75
Election
Year
Prime MinisterSummary Labor Nationalist Various Agrarian Parties [1] - Independent Other
parties
Total
seats
8th 1919 Billy Hughes
(1862–1952)
Billy Hughes 1919.jpg The Nationalists form another government under Billy Hughes with Independent support. First election held under Instant-runoff voting .263711 1 75
Election
Year
Prime MinisterSummary Labor Nationalist Country - Independent Other
parties
Total
seats
9th 1922 Billy Hughes
(1862–1952)

Stanley Bruce
(1883–1967)

Hughes16-23.jpg

Stanley Bruce 1926.jpg

From around 1920, Hughes lost the support of many of the conservative elements of his party. The Nationalists lose their majority in the election. Earle Page declares that his Country Party will not serve under Hughes, forcing Hughes to resign a month after his re-election. His Treasurer Stanley Bruce forms a coalition Government with the Country Party.292614 15 Liberal 75
Election
Year
Prime MinisterSummary Labor Nationalist Country - Independent Other
parties
Total
seats
10th 1925 Stanley Bruce
(1883–1967)
Stanley Bruce 1926.jpg The Coalition of Nationalists and the Country Party forms another government under Stanley Bruce.233714 1 75
Election
Year
Prime MinisterSummary Labor Nationalist Country - Independent Other
parties
Total
seats
11th 1928 Stanley Bruce
(1883–1967)
Stanley Bruce 1926.jpg The Coalition forms another government under Stanley Bruce despite Labor gaining eight seats under Jim Scullin.312913 11Country Progressives75
Election
Year
Prime MinisterSummary Labor Nationalist Country - Independent Other
parties
Total
seats
12th 1929 Jim Scullin
(1876–1953)
Portrait of the Right Hon. J. H. Scullin.png Labor forms a government under Jim Scullin in an election where Prime Minister Stanley Bruce is defeated in his seat of Flinders.461410 41Country Progressives75
Election
Year
Prime MinisterSummary Labor United Australia Party Country Lang Labor Independent Other
parties
Total
seats
13th 1931 Joe Lyons
(1879–1939)
Joseph Lyons.jpg United Australia , forms a minority government under Joe Lyons.143416416 Emergency Committee 75
Election
Year
Prime MinisterSummary Labor United Australia Party Country Lang Labor Independent Other
parties
Total
seats
14th 1934 Joe Lyons
(1879–1939)
Joseph Lyons.jpg The Coalition of the UAP and the Country Party forms a government under Joe Lyons.1828149 5 LCL 74
Election
Year
Prime MinisterSummary Labor United Australia Party Country Lang Labor Independent Other
parties
Total
seats
15th 1937 Joe Lyons
(1879–1939)

Sir Earle Page
(1880–1961)

Robert Menzies
(1894–1978)

Joseph Lyons.jpg

Earle Page.jpg

Robert Menzies in 1939.jpg

The Coalition forms another government under Joe Lyons.292816 1 74
Election
Year
Prime MinisterSummary Labor United Australia Party Country Lang Labor Independent Other
parties
Total
seats
16th 1940 Robert Menzies
(1894–1978)

Arthur Fadden
(1895–1973)

John Curtin
(1885–1945)

Robert Menzies in 1939.jpg

FaddenPEO.jpg

JohnCurtin.jpg

The Coalition forms a minority government under Robert Menzies.

Billy Hughes later replaces him as UAP leader, and Country Party leader Arthur Fadden replaces him as Coalition leader and Prime Minister. Fadden serves for only 40 days, until Labor and the independents defeat his budget.

Labor forms Government under John Curtin.

32231441 74
Election
Year
Prime MinisterSummary Labor United Australia Party Country Lang Labor Independent Other
parties
Total
seats
17th 1943 John Curtin
(1885–1945)

Frank Forde
(1890–1983)

Ben Chifley
(1885–1951)

JohnCurtin.jpg

Frank Forde 1945.jpg

Benchifley.jpg

Labor forms a government under John Curtin.49127 15Country-National (3), Liberal Country, Country (QLD)74
Election
Year
Prime MinisterSummary Labor Liberal Country Lang Labor Independent Other
parties
Total
seats
18th 1946 Ben Chifley
(1885–1951)
Benchifley.jpg Labor forms a government under Ben Chifley.431511113 LCL (2), Liberal Country74
Election
Year
Prime MinisterSummary Labor Liberal Country - Independent Other
parties
Total
seats
19th 1949 Robert Menzies
(1894–1978)
Portrait Menzies 1950s.jpg The Coalition forms a government under Robert Menzies, but lacks a Senate majority. Menzies uses the Senate's rejection of the Commonwealth Bank Bill 1951 as a trigger for a double dissolution election.475519   121
Election
Year
Prime MinisterSummary Labor Liberal Country - Independent Other
parties
Total
seats
20th 1951 Robert Menzies
(1894–1978)
Portrait Menzies 1950s.jpg The Coalition forms another government under Robert Menzies and gains control of the Senate after a double dissolution.525217   121
Election
Year
Prime MinisterSummary Labor Liberal Country - Independent Other
parties
Total
seats
21st 1954 Robert Menzies
(1894–1978)
Portrait Menzies 1950s.jpg The Coalition forms another government under Robert Menzies.574717   121
Election
Year
Prime MinisterSummary Labor Liberal Country - Independent Other
parties
Total
seats
22nd 1955 Robert Menzies
(1894–1978)
Portrait Menzies 1950s.jpg The Coalition forms another government under Robert Menzies.475718   122
Election
Year
Prime MinisterSummary Labor Liberal Country - Independent Other
parties
Total
seats
23rd 1958 Robert Menzies
(1894–1978)
Portrait Menzies 1950s.jpg The Coalition forms another government under Robert Menzies.455819   122
Election
Year
Prime MinisterSummary Labor Liberal Country - Independent Other
parties
Total
seats
24th 1961 Robert Menzies
(1894–1978)
RobertMenzies.jpg The Coalition forms another government under Robert Menzies.604517   122
Election
Year
Prime MinisterSummary Labor Liberal Country - Independent Other
parties
Total
seats
25th 1963 Sir Robert Menzies
(1894–1978)

Harold Holt
(1908–1967)

RobertMenzies.jpg

Harold Holt 1965 01.jpg

The Coalition forms another government under Sir Robert Menzies.505220   122
Election
Year
Prime MinisterSummary Labor Liberal Country - Independent Other
parties
Total
seats
26th 1966 Harold Holt
(1908–1967)

John McEwen
(1900–1980)

John Gorton
(1911–2002)

Harold Holt 1965 01.jpg

Sir John McEwen.jpg

JohnGorton1968.jpg

The Coalition forms a government under Harold Holt.416121 1 124
Election
Year
Prime MinisterSummary Labor Liberal Country - Independent Other
parties
Total
seats
27th 1969 John Gorton
(1911–2002)

William McMahon
(1908–1988)

JohnGorton1968.jpg

McMahon 1971 (cropped).jpg

The Coalition forms a government under John Gorton.594620   125
Election
Year
Prime MinisterSummary Labor Liberal Country - Independent Other
parties
Total
seats
28th 1972 Gough Whitlam
(1916–2014)
Gough Whitlam - ACF - crop.jpg Labor forms its first government since 1949 under Gough Whitlam.673820   125
Election
Year
Prime MinisterSummary Labor Liberal Country - Independent Other
parties
Total
seats
29th 1974 Gough Whitlam
(1916–2014)

Malcolm Fraser
(1930–2015)

Gough Whitlam - ACF - crop.jpg

Malcolm Fraser 1977 - crop.jpg

Labor forms another government under Gough Whitlam after a double dissolution triggered by a hostile Senate and resulting in the 1974 Joint Sitting.

The Coalition forms a government under Malcolm Fraser following his appointment as Prime Minister by Governor-General Sir John Kerr in the 1975 constitutional crisis.

664021   127
Election
Year
Prime MinisterSummary Labor Liberal National Country Party - Independent Other
parties
Total
seats
30th 1975 Malcolm Fraser
(1930–2015)
Malcolm Fraser 1977 - crop.jpg The Coalition forms a government under Malcolm Fraser.366823   127
Election
Year
Prime MinisterSummary Labor Liberal National Country Party - Independent Other
parties
Total
seats
31st 1977 Malcolm Fraser
(1930–2015)
Malcolm Fraser 1977 - crop.jpg The Coalition forms another government under Malcolm Fraser.386719   124
Election
Year
Prime MinisterSummary Labor Liberal National Country Party - Independent Other
parties
Total
seats
32nd 1980 Malcolm Fraser
(1930–2015)
MalcolmFraser1982.JPEG The Coalition forms another government under Malcolm Fraser.515420   125
Election
Year
Prime MinisterSummary Labor Liberal Nationals - Independent Other
parties
Total
seats
33rd 1983 Bob Hawke
(1929-2019)
Bob Hawke Portrait 1983.jpg Labor forms a government under Bob Hawke after a double dissolution.753317   125
Election
Year
Prime MinisterSummary Labor Liberal Nationals - Independent Other
parties
Total
seats
34th 1984 Bob Hawke
(1929-2019)
Bob Hawke Portrait 1983.jpg Labor forms another government under Bob Hawke.824521   148
Election
Year
Prime MinisterSummary Labor Liberal Nationals - Independent Other
parties
Total
seats
35th 1987 Bob Hawke
(1929-2019)
Bob Hawke 1987 portrait crop.jpg Labor forms another government under Bob Hawke after a double dissolution over the Australia Card.864319   148
Election
Year
Prime MinisterSummary Labor Liberal Nationals - Independent Other
parties
Total
seats
36th 1990 Bob Hawke
(1929-2019)

Paul Keating
(1944– )

Bob Hawke 1987 portrait crop.jpg

Paul Keating 1985.jpg

Labor forms another government under Bob Hawke.785514 1 148
Election
Year
Prime MinisterSummary Labor Liberal Nationals - Independent Other
parties
Total
seats
37th 1993 Paul Keating
(1944– )
Paul Keating 1985.jpg Labor forms a government under Paul Keating.804916 2 147
Election
Year
Prime MinisterSummary Labor Liberal Nationals - Independent Other
parties
Total
seats
38th 1996 John Howard
(1939– )
John howard.jpg The Coalition forms a government under John Howard.497519 5 148
Election
Year
Prime MinisterSummary Labor Liberal Nationals - Independent Other
parties
Total
seats
39th 1998 John Howard
(1939– )
John howard.jpg The Coalition forms another government under John Howard.676416 1 148
Election
Year
Prime MinisterSummary Labor Liberal Nationals - Independent Other
parties
Total
seats
40th 2001 John Howard
(1939– )
Image-Howard2003upr.JPG The Coalition forms another government under John Howard.656913 3 150
Election
Year
Prime MinisterSummary Labor Liberal Nationals - Independent Other
parties
Total
seats
41st 2004 John Howard
(1939– )
Image-Howard2003upr.JPG The Coalition forms another government under John Howard.607512 3 150
Election
Year
Prime MinisterSummary Labor Liberal Nationals - Independent Other
parties
Total
seats
42nd 2007 Kevin Rudd
(1957– )

Julia Gillard
(1961– )

Kevin Rudd official portrait.jpg

Julia Gillard 2010.jpg

Labor forms a government under Kevin Rudd.835510 2 150
Election
Year
Prime MinisterSummary Labor Liberal Nationals Greens Independent Other
parties
Total
seats
43rd 2010 Julia Gillard
(1961– )

Kevin Rudd
(1957– )

Julia Gillard 2010.jpg

Kevin Rudd portrait.jpg

Labor forms a minority government with the support of 3 independents and 1 Green under Julia Gillard.7244 (+ 16 LNP and 1 CLP)6 + (5 LNP)141 WA Nationals 150
Election
Year
Prime MinisterSummary Labor Liberal Nationals Greens Independent Other
parties
Total
seats
44th 2013 Tony Abbott
(1957– )

Malcolm Turnbull
(1954– )

Prime Minister Tony Abbott.jpg

Malcolm Turnbull PEO (cropped).jpg

The Coalition forms a government under Tony Abbott.5558 (+ 16 LNP and 1 CLP)9 (+6 LNP)122(1) Katter's Australian Party
(1) Palmer United
150
Election
Year
Prime MinisterSummary Labor Liberal Nationals Greens Independent Other
parties
Total
seats
45th 2016 Malcolm Turnbull
(1954– )

Scott Morrison

(1968– )

Malcolm Turnbull PEO (cropped).jpg

Scott Morrison 2014 crop.jpg

The Coalition forms another government under Malcolm Turnbull.6945 (+ 15 LNP)10 (+ 6 LNP)122(1) Katter's Australian Party
(1) Nick Xenophon Team
150

al
seats

Election
Year
Prime MinisterSummary Labor Liberal Nationals Greens Independent Other
parties
Total
seats
46th 2019Scott Morrison

(1968 -)

Scott Morrison 2014 crop.jpg The Coalition forms another government under Scott Morrison.6945 (+ 15 LNP)10 (+ 6 LNP)131(1) Katter's Australian Party (KAP)151

House of Representatives primary, two-party and seat results

A two-party system has existed in the Australian House of Representatives since the two non-Labor parties merged in 1909. The 1910 election was the first to elect a majority government, with the Australian Labor Party concurrently winning the first Senate majority. Prior to 1909 a three-party system existed in the chamber. A two-party-preferred vote (2PP) has been calculated since the 1919 change from first-past-the-post to preferential voting and subsequent introduction of the Coalition. ALP = Australian Labor Party, L+NP = grouping of Liberal/National/LNP/CLP Coalition parties (and predecessors), Oth = other parties and independents.

House of Representatives results and polling
Election
Year
Labour Free Trade Protectionist Independent Other
parties
Total
seats
1st 19011428312 75
Election
Year
Labour Free Trade Protectionist Independent Other
parties
Total
seats
2nd 1903232526 1 Revenue Tariff 75
Election
Year
Labour Anti-Socialist Protectionist Independent Other
parties
Total
seats
3rd 190626262111 Western Australian 75
Primary vote 2PP vote Seats
ALPL+NPOth.ALPL+NPALPL+NPOth.Total
13 April 1910 election 50.0%45.1%4.9%4231275
31 May 1913 election 48.5%48.9%2.6%3738075
5 September 1914 election 50.9%47.2%1.9%4232175
5 May 1917 election 43.9%54.2%1.9%2253075
13 December 1919 election 42.5%54.3%3.2%45.9%54.1%2538275
16 December 1922 election 42.3%47.8%9.9%48.8%51.2%2940675
14 November 1925 election 45.0%53.2%1.8%46.2%53.8%2350275
17 November 1928 election 44.6%49.6%5.8%48.4%51.6%3142275
12 October 1929 election 48.8%44.2%7.0%56.7%43.3%4624575
19 December 1931 election 27.1%48.4%24.5%41.5%58.5%14501175
15 September 1934 election 26.8%45.6%27.6%46.5%53.5%18421474
23 October 1937 election 43.2%49.3%7.5%49.4%50.6%2943274
21 September 1940 election 40.2%43.9%15.9%50.3%49.7%3236674
21 August 1943 election 49.9%23.0%27.1%58.2%41.8%4919674
28 September 1946 election 49.7%39.3%11.0%54.1%45.9%4326574
10 December 1949 election 46.0%50.3%3.7%49.0%51.0%47740121
28 April 1951 election 47.6%50.3%2.1%49.3%50.7%52690121
29 May 1954 election 50.0%46.8%3.2%50.7%49.3%57640121
10 December 1955 election 44.6%47.6%7.8%45.8%54.2%47750122
22 November 1958 election 42.8%46.6%10.6%45.9%54.1%45770122
9 December 1961 election 47.9%42.1%10.0%50.5%49.5%60620122
30 November 1963 election 45.5%46.0%8.5%47.4%52.6%50720122
26 November 1966 election 40.0%50.0%10.0%43.1%56.9%41821124
25 October 1969 election 47.0%43.3%9.7%50.2%49.8%59660125
2 December 1972 election 49.6%41.5%8.9%52.7%47.3%67580125
18 May 1974 election 49.3%44.9%5.8%51.7%48.3%66610127
13 December 1975 election 42.8%53.1%4.1%44.3%55.7%36910127
10 December 1977 election 39.7%48.1%12.2%45.4%54.6%38860124
18 October 1980 election 45.2%46.3%8.5%49.6%50.4%51740125
5 March 1983 election 49.5%43.6%6.9%53.2%46.8%75500125
1 December 1984 election 47.6%45.0%7.4%51.8%48.2%82660148
11 July 1987 election 45.8%46.1%8.1%50.8%49.2%86620148
24 March 1990 election 39.4%43.5%17.1%49.9%50.1%78691148
13 March 1993 election 44.9%44.3%10.7%51.4%48.6%80652147
2 March 1996 election 38.7%47.3%14.0%46.4%53.6%49945148
3 October 1998 election 40.1%39.5%20.4%51.0%49.0%67801148
10 November 2001 election 37.8%43.0%19.2%49.0%51.0%65823150
9 October 2004 election 37.6%46.7%15.7%47.3%52.7%60873150
24 November 2007 election 43.4%42.1%14.5%52.7%47.3%83652150
21 August 2010 election 38.0%43.3%18.7%50.1%49.9%72726150
7 September 2013 election 33.4%45.6%21.0%46.5%53.5%55905150
2 July 2016 election 34.7%42.0%23.3%49.6%50.4%69765150
18 May 2019 election 33.3%41.4%25.3%48.5%51.5%68776151

Historical party composition of the Senate

The Senate has included representatives from a range of political parties, including several parties that have seldom or never had representation in the House of Representatives, but which have consistently secured a small but significant level of electoral support, as the table shows.

Results represent the composition of the Senate after the elections. The full Senate has been contested on eight occasions; the inaugural election and seven double dissolutions. These are underlined and highlighted in puce. [2]

Election
Year
Labor Liberal [lower-alpha 1] National [lower-alpha 2] Democratic
Labor
Democrats Greens CLP Independent Other
parties
Total
seats
Electoral
system
1st 1901811 [lower-alpha 3] 17       36 Plurality-at-large voting
2nd 1903812 [lower-alpha 3] 14     11 Revenue Tariff 36Plurality-at-large voting
3rd 1906156 [lower-alpha 3] 13     2 36Plurality-at-large voting
4th 19102214       36Plurality-at-large voting
5th 1913297       36Plurality-at-large voting
6th 1914315       36Plurality-at-large voting
7th 19171224       36Plurality-at-large voting
8th 1919135       36 Preferential block voting
9th 19221224       36Preferential block voting
10th 19258253      36Preferential block voting
11th 19287245      36Preferential block voting
12th 193110215      36Preferential block voting
13th 19343267      36Preferential block voting
14th 193716164      36Preferential block voting
15th 194017154      36Preferential block voting
16th 194322122      36Preferential block voting
17th 19463321      36Preferential block voting
18th 194934215      60 Single transferable vote
19th 195128266      60Single transferable vote
20th 195329265      60Single transferable vote
21st 1955282462     60Single transferable vote
22nd 1958262572     60Single transferable vote
23rd 1961282461   1 60Single transferable vote
24th 1964272372   1 60Single transferable vote
25th 1967272174   1 60Single transferable vote
26th 1970262155   3 60Single transferable vote
27th 197429236    11 Liberal Movement 60Single transferable vote
28th 197527268   111 Liberal Movement 64Single transferable vote
29th 197727276 2 11 64Single transferable vote
30th 198027273 5 11 64Single transferable vote
31st 198330234 5 11 64Single transferable vote
32nd 198434275 7 111 Nuclear Disarmament 76Single transferable vote (Group voting ticket)
33rd 198732267 7 121 Nuclear Disarmament 76Single transferable vote (Group voting ticket)
34th 199032285 8 111 Greens (WA) 76Single transferable vote (Group voting ticket)
35th 199330296 7 112 Greens (WA) (2)76Single transferable vote (Group voting ticket)
36th 199629315 7 112 Greens (WA), Greens (Tas) 76Single transferable vote (Group voting ticket)
37th 199829313 91111 One Nation 76Single transferable vote (Group voting ticket)
38th 200128313 82121 One Nation 76Single transferable vote (Group voting ticket)
39th 200428335 441 1 Family First 76Single transferable vote (Group voting ticket)
40th 200732324  5111 Family First 76Single transferable vote (Group voting ticket)
41st 20103128 + (3 LNP)21 911 76Single transferable vote (Group voting ticket)
42nd 20132523 + (5 LNP)3 + (1 LNP)1 10116 Family First,
Liberal Democrats,
Motoring Enthusiast,
Palmer United (3)
76Single transferable vote (Group voting ticket)
43rd 20162621 + (3 LNP)3 + (2 LNP) 9111 Family First,
Liberal Democrats,
Jacqui Lambie,
Justice Party,
Nick Xenophon Team (3),
One Nation (4)
76Single transferable vote (Optional preferential voting)
44th 20192626 + (4 LNP)2 + (2 LNP) 9115 Centre Alliance (2),
Jacqui Lambie,
One Nation (2),
76Single transferable vote (Optional preferential voting)

See also

Notes

  1. Includes results for the Free Trade Party for 1901 and 1903, the Anti-Socialist Party for 1906, the Commonwealth Liberal Party for 1910—1914, the Nationalist Party for 1917—1929, and the United Australia Party for 1931—1943.
  2. Includes results for the Country Party for 1919—1974 and the National Country Party for 1975—1980.
  3. 1 2 3 Protectionist Party

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The Parliament of Australia is the legislative branch of the government of Australia. It consists of three elements: the Crown, the Senate and the House of Representatives. The combination of two elected chambers, in which the members of the Senate represent the states and territories while the members of the House represent electoral divisions according to population, is modelled on the United States Congress. Through both chambers, however, there is a fused executive, drawn from the Westminster system.

2004 Australian federal election

The 2004 Australian federal election was held in Australia on 9 October 2004. All 150 seats in the House of Representatives and 40 seats in the 76-member Senate were up for election. The incumbent Liberal Party of Australia led by Prime Minister of Australia John Howard and coalition partner the National Party of Australia led by John Anderson defeated the opposition Australian Labor Party led by Mark Latham.

1996 Australian federal election election

The 1996 Australian federal election was held to determine the members of the 38th Parliament of Australia. It was held on 2 March 1996. All 148 seats of the House of Representatives and 40 seats of the 76-seat Senate were up for election. The centre-right Liberal/National Coalition led by Opposition Leader John Howard of the Liberal Party and coalition partner Tim Fischer of the National Party defeated in a landslide the incumbent centre-left Australian Labor Party government led by Prime Minister Paul Keating.

Elections in Australia discussion of elections conducted in Australia

Elections in Australia take place periodically to elect the legislature of the Commonwealth of Australia, as well as for each Australian state and territory. Elections in all jurisdictions follow similar principles, though there are minor variations between them. The elections for the Australian Parliament are held under the federal electoral system, which is uniform throughout the country, and the elections for state and territory Parliaments are held under the electoral system of each state and territory.

2007 New South Wales state election

Elections for the 54th Parliament of New South Wales were held on Saturday, 24 March 2007. The entire Legislative Assembly and half of the Legislative Council was up for election. The Labor Party led by Morris Iemma won a fourth four-year term against the Liberal-National coalition led by Peter Debnam.

1963 Australian federal election

The 1963 Australian federal election was held in Australia on 30 November 1963. All 122 seats in the House of Representatives were up for election. The incumbent Liberal–Country coalition government, led by Prime Minister Robert Menzies, won an increased majority over the opposition Labor Party, led by Arthur Calwell.

Politics of Australia Political system of Australia

The politics of Australia take place within the framework of a federal parliamentary constitutional monarchy. Australia has maintained a stable liberal democratic political system under its Constitution, one of the world's oldest, since Federation in 1901. Australia is the world's sixth oldest continuous democracy and largely operates as a two-party system in which voting is compulsory. The Economist Intelligence Unit rated Australia a "full democracy" in 2019. Australia is also a federation, where power is divided between the federal government and the states and territories.

Democratic Labor Party (historical) former political party in Australia

The Democratic Labor Party (DLP) was an Australian political party. The party came into existence following the 1955 Labor split as the Australian Labor Party (Anti-Communist), and was renamed the Democratic Labor Party in 1957. In 1962, the Queensland Labor Party, a breakaway party of the Queensland branch of the Australian Labor Party, became the Queensland branch of the DLP. The DLP continued to exist until it was deregistered in 1978.

1974 Australian federal election

The 1974 Australian federal election was held in Australia on 18 May 1974. All 127 seats in the House of Representatives and all 60 seats in the Senate were up for election, due to a double dissolution. The incumbent Labor Party led by Prime Minister Gough Whitlam defeated the opposition Liberal–Country coalition led by Billy Snedden.

1949 Australian federal election

The 1949 Australian federal election was held in Australia on 10 December 1949. All 121 seats in the House of Representatives and 42 of the 60 seats in the Senate were up for election. The incumbent Labor Party, led by Prime Minister Ben Chifley, was defeated by the opposition Liberal–Country coalition under Robert Menzies. Menzies became prime minister for a second time, his first term having ended in 1941. This election marked the end of the 8-year Curtin-Chifley Labor Government that had been in power since 1941 and started the 23-year Liberal/Country Coalition Government. This was the first time the Liberal party won government at the federal level.

The Queensland Labor Party (QLP) was a political party of Queensland, Australia formed in 1957 by a breakaway group of the then ruling Labor Party Government after the expulsion of Premier Vince Gair. In 1962 the party became the Queensland section of the Democratic Labor Party (DLP). The party continued to hold seats in the Queensland state parliament until 1972, then suffered a collapse in its vote and wound itself up in 1978.

2010 Australian federal election general election

The 2010 Australian federal election was held on Saturday, 21 August 2010 to elect members of the 43rd Parliament of Australia. The incumbent centre-left Australian Labor Party led by Prime Minister Julia Gillard won a second term against the opposition centre-right Liberal Party of Australia led by Opposition Leader Tony Abbott and Coalition partner the National Party of Australia, led by Warren Truss, after Labor formed a minority government with the support of three independent MPs and one Australian Greens MP. As of 2020 this remains the last federal election victory for the Labor party.

2013 Australian federal election Election held on 7 September 2013

The 2013 Australianfederal election to elect the members of the 44th Parliament of Australia took place on 7 September 2013. The centre-right Liberal/National Coalition opposition led by Opposition leader Tony Abbott of the Liberal Party of Australia and Coalition partner the National Party of Australia, led by Warren Truss, defeated the incumbent centre-left Labor Party government of Prime Minister Kevin Rudd by an 18-seat 3.6 percentage point two-party swing resulting in a landslide win for the Coalition. Labor had been in government for 6 years since first being elected in the 2007 election. This election marked the end of the 6-year Rudd-Gillard-Rudd Labor government and the start of the current Abbott-Turnbull-Morrison Liberal-National Coalition government. Abbott was sworn in by the Governor-General, Quentin Bryce, as Australia's new Prime Minister on 18 September 2013, along with the Abbott Ministry and the members of the House of Representatives. The 44th Parliament of Australia opened on 12 November 2013, which is taken to be the commencement of the term of members of the House of Representatives. The new senators were sworn in by the next Governor-General Peter Cosgrove on 7 July 2014, with their six-year terms commencing on 1 July.

Results of the 2010 Australian federal election (Senate)

The following tables show state-by-state results in the Australian Senate at the 2010 federal election. Senators total 34 Coalition, 31 Labor, nine Green, one Democratic Labor Party, and one independent, Nick Xenophon. New Senators took their places from 1 July 2011.

History of the Australian Labor Party

The history of the Australian Labor Party has its origins in the Labour parties founded in the 1890s in the Australian colonies prior to federation. Labor tradition ascribes the founding of Queensland Labour to a meeting of striking pastoral workers under a ghost gum tree in Barcaldine, Queensland in 1891. The Balmain, New South Wales branch of the party claims to be the oldest in Australia. Labour as a parliamentary party dates from 1891 in New South Wales and South Australia, 1893 in Queensland, and later in the other colonies.

Results of the 2016 Australian federal election (Senate)

The 2016 Australian federal election in the Senate was part of a double dissolution election held on Saturday 2 July to elect all 226 members of the 45th Parliament of Australia, after an extended eight-week official campaign period. It was the first double dissolution election since the 1987 election and the first under a new voting system for the Senate that replaced group voting tickets with optional preferential voting.

References

  1. Includes Farmers and Settlers Party and Victorian Farmers Union
  2. "A database of elections, governments, parties and representation for Australian state and federal parliaments since 1890". University of Western Australia. Retrieved 2009-02-15.