1967 Australian referendum

Last updated

The 1967 Australian referendum occurred on 27 May 1967 under the Holt Government. It contained two questions, regarding the passage of two bills to alter the Australian Constitution to: [1]

Contents

  1. Increase the number of Members in the House of Representatives, formally the Constitution Alteration (Parliament) 1967.
  2. Include Indigenous Australians (referred to as "the Aboriginal Race") in the Census of Population and Housing and permit legislatures to legislate differently for Indigenous Australian. [2] [3]

The latter of the two questions was carried under the Constitution Alteration (Aboriginals) 1967.

Results [4]
Proposed amendmentState majority achievedStates in favourNational supportResult
NSW Vic Qld SA WA Tas
Constitution Alteration (Parliament) 1967 YesNoNoNoNoNo1:540%Not carried
Constitution Alteration (Aboriginals) 1967 YesYesYesYesYesYes6:091%Carried

See also

Related Research Articles

1967 Australian referendum (Aboriginals) Question 2 of 1967 Australian referendum, about counting Indigenous people in the census and allowing the government to legislate separately for them

The second part of the 1967 Australian referendum to change the Constitution related to the inclusion of Indigenous Australians in the Census of Population and Housing and the provisioning of separate laws for Indigenous peoples, described as "the Aboriginal Race" in the referendum text but clarified in the case of Commonwealth v. Tasmania. The referendum called by the Holt Government on 27 May 1967, consisted of two parts. Technically this referendum question was a vote on the Constitution Alteration (Aboriginals) 1967, which was carried on 10 August 1967 following the results of the referendum.

Referendums in Australia

Referendums in Australia are polls held in Australia to approve parliament-proposed changes to the Constitution of Australia or to the constitutions of states and territories. Polls conducted on non-constitutional issues are usually referred to as plebiscites.

1967 Australian referendum (Parliament)

The first part of the 1967 Australian referendum to change the Constitution was the Parliament question, which related to the relative number of members in each house of the Australian Parliament − the so-called "nexus". The 1967 Australian referendum called by the Holt Government on 27 May 1967 consisted of two parts, with the second question relating to Aboriginal Australians.

The Australian referendum of 12 December 1906 approved an amendment to the Australian constitution related to the terms of office of federal senators. Technically it was a vote on the Constitution Alteration Bill 1906, which after being approved in the referendum received the royal assent on 3 April 1907. The amendment moved the date of the beginning of the term of members of the Senate from 1 January to 1 July so that elections to the federal House of Representatives and the Senate could occur simultaneously.

The 1988 Australian Referendum was held on 3 September 1988. It contained four referendum questions, none of which passed.

Constitution Alteration 1946 proposed to extend the powers of government over a range of social services. The question was put to a referendum in the 1946 Australian referendum with two other (unrelated) questions. It was carried and inserted s51(xxiiiA) into section 51 of the Australian Constitution.

The referendum of 13 April 1910 approved an amendment to the Australian constitution. The referendum was for practical purposes a vote on the Constitution Alteration Bill 1909, which after being approved in the referendum received the Royal Assent on 6 August.

The Constitution Alteration Bill 1910, was an unsuccessful Australian referendum held in the 1911 referendums which sought to alter the Australian Constitution to extend the Commonwealth power in respect of trade and commerce, the control of corporations, labour and employment and combinations and monopolies. All of the proposed changes were contained within the one question.

The Constitution Alteration (Monopolies) Bill 1910, was an Australian referendum held in the 1911 referendums which sought to alter the Australian Constitution to give the Commonwealth power to nationalise any corporation deemed by both houses of parliament to be a monopoly.

The Constitution Alteration Bill 1912, was an unsuccessful Australian referendum held in the 1913 referendums which sought to alter the Australian Constitution to extend Commonwealth legislative power in respect to trade and commerce.

The Constitution Alteration (Corporations) Bill 1912, was an unsuccessful Australian referendum held in the 1913 referendums which sought to alter the Australian Constitution to extend the Commonwealth legislative power in respect to corporations.

The Constitution Alteration Bill 1912, was an unsuccessful Australian referendum held in the 1913 referendums which sought to alter the Australian Constitution to give the Commonwealth legislative power in respect to industrial matters.

The Constitution Alteration (Trusts) Bill 1912, was an unsuccessful Australian referendum held in the 1913 referendums which sought to alter the Australian Constitution to give the Commonwealth legislative power in respect to trusts.

The Constitution Alteration Bill 1912, was an unsuccessful Australian referendum held in the 1913 referendums which sought to alter the Australian Constitution to give the Commonwealth legislative power in respect to monopolies.

The Constitution Alteration Bill 1912, was an unsuccessful Australian referendum held in the 1913 referendums which sought to alter the Australian Constitution to give the Commonwealth legislative power over industrial relations in the State railway services. The question was put to a referendum in the 1913 Australian referendum.

Constitution Alteration (Aviation) 1936 was an Australian referendum held in the 1937 referendums which sought to alter the Australian Constitution to give the Commonwealth legislative power with respect to air navigation and aircraft.

Constitution Alteration (Marketing) 1936 was an Australian referendum held in the 1937 referendums which sought to alter the Australian Constitution to remove the restraints imposed on Parliament by section 92 of the Constitution.

Constitution Alteration 1946 was an Australian referendum held in the 1946 referendums which sought to alter the Australian Constitution to give the Commonwealth legislative power over the terms and conditions of industrial employment but not so as to authorise any form of industrial conscription. The question was narrowly rejected.

Constitution of Australia founding documents of Australia and legislative act of the United Kingdom

The Constitution of Australia, commonly referred to as the Australian Constitution, is the supreme law which constitutes the Commonwealth of Australia, the federal nation known as Australia. It provides the legal framework for the Australian federal government and for government in the States and Territories of Australia.

<i>Uluru Statement from the Heart</i> 2017 statement by Indigenous Australians seeking constitutional recognition and reform

The Uluru Statement from the Heart was released on 26 May 2017 by delegates to the First Nations National Constitutional Convention, held over four days near Uluru in Central Australia. The Convention was held after the 16-member Referendum Council, appointed in 2015, had travelled around the country and met with over 1,200 people. The statement was issued after the Convention, and calls for a "First Nations Voice" in the Australian Constitution and a Makarrata Commission to supervise a process of "agreement-making" and truth-telling between the Australian Government and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

References

  1. Ley, P L (6 April 1967). "'Referendums to be held on Saturday, 27 May, 1967, on the proposed laws for the alteration of the Constitution entitled Constitution alteration (Parliament) 1967 and Constitution alteration (Aboriginals) 1967". Museums Victoria Collections. Retrieved 3 August 2020.
  2. "A Guide to the Constitutional Recognition of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples in Australia" (PDF). Ready 4 Recognition. p. 11. Retrieved 4 August 2020.
  3. Arcioni, Elisa (1 September 2012). "Excluding Indigenous Australians from 'The People': A Reconsideration of Sections 25 and 127 of the Constitution". Federal Law Review. Canberra: Australian National University. 40 (3). ISSN   1444-6928 . Retrieved 4 August 2020.
  4. Handbook of the 44th Parliament (2014) "Part 5 - Referendums and Plebiscites - Referendum results". Parliamentary Library of Australia..

Further reading